russian citizen

anonymous asked:

hply shit. Chechenya's (an autonomous region of Russia) recently opened concentration camps for LGBT peoples. 100 gay men have been captured and 3+ have died

I don’t even have the words for this.

Human Rights Watch states:

For several weeks now, a brutal campaign against LGBT people has been sweeping through Chechnya. Law enforcement and security agency officials under control of the ruthless head of the Chechen Republic, Ramzan Kadyrov, have rounded up dozens of men on suspicion of being gay, torturing and humiliating the victims. Some of the men have forcibly disappeared. Others were returned to their families barely alive from beatings. At least three men apparently have died since this brutal campaign began.

This chilling information was first publicised by Novaya Gazeta, a leading independent Russian paper. Their report came out on 1 April, prompting the spokesperson for Chechnya’s Interior Ministry to dismiss it as an “April fools’ joke.” Kadyrov’s press secretary immediately described the report as “absolute lies and disinformation,” contending that there were no gay people in Chechnya and then adding cynically, “If there were such people in Chechnya, law-enforcement agencies wouldn’t need to have anything to do with them because their relatives would send them somewhere from which there is no returning.”

Mass pro-Kadyrov rally organized by Chechen authorities in Grozny in January 2016.

Chechnya’s official news agency, Grozny Info, quoted numerous local commentators bashing Novaya Gazeta and other “enemies” of Chechnya and Russia for supposed attempts to discredit the Chechen people, “foster sodomy,” and undermine “traditional values.”

The information published by Novaya Gazeta is consistent with the reports Human Rights Watch recently received from numerous trusted sources, including sources on the ground. The number of sources and the consistency of the stories leaves us with no doubt that these devastating developments have indeed occurred. LGBT Network in Russia opened a special hotline to provide emergency support to those who find themselves in immediate danger.

The Russian LGBT Network has released a statement with stories about what has happened to some (obviously anonymous) men.

It’s really important to share the Russian LGBT Network’s statement overall:

The Russian LGBT Networks is highly disturbed and concerned about the information on the kidnapping and killing of people in Chechnya because of their sexual orientation. We are also outraged by the reaction of the officials of the Chechen Republic, who in fact justify the killings.  No national and/or religious traditions and norms can justify kidnapping or killing of a human being. Any references to “traditions” to justify kidnappings and killings are amoral and criminal.

The Russian LGBT Network makes every effort to contact the victims and to provide the emergency support. Taking into account the recent statements of the Chechnya officials, we believe that the only thing that can work out is the evacuation. We cooperate closely we the human rights defenders both in Russia and abroad, and ready to evacuate.

On Monday, the Russian LGBT Network will appeal to the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation with two claims. The one is the demand to investigate the information on the crimes, published in “Novaya Gazeta”. Another one is the claim to check whether the public statements of the Chechen officials made on April 1 and justifying the killings, contain the elements of the offence.

We are grateful to everyone who contacted us and asked how they can help. What do we need now?

  • Help us to spread the information about the fact that the Russian LGBT Network is ready to evacuate people. Please think for whom this information can be useful. You can spread the information publicly or personally. Everyone who needs help can contact us by email or call the Hotline (8 800 555 73 74). The call is free all over Russia.
  • In accordance with the Russian legislation, every citizen can apply to the Investigative Committee with the demand to investigate the information about the crime published in mass media. We encourage everyone to apply (the template of the claim will be published tomorrow).

We understand that many people want to help those in need. But please remember that any uncoordinated actions can put in additional danger people in need and those who are ready to help. Therefore, we do not recommend to collect the addresses of people who are ready to provide temporarily shelter.

Be aware, that the situation with the human rights in the North Caucasus is truly difficult. Now people’s lives are endangered and the only way to help is the evacuation. The Russian LGBT Network has the necessary resources to evacuate people, there is a team that already makes every effort to safe lives. That is why we ask everyone to share with us the information about people in need and any offers of assistance.

Again, their contact information is here for all Russians, and the number is free to call.

This is very real, modern day evil and this information needs to be shared.

10

Steven Seagal, Trump supporter, Putin BFF and “action hero” who voluntarily gave up his American citizenship to become a Russian citizen, wants Americans to know that it’s “disrespectful” if Americans don’t stand for the national anthem.

Just say you hate black people, eat another carrot, and STFU.

JFC. Irony and hypocrisy are officially dead, and it’s not millennials who killed them.

Random Russian fact

Did you know that every Russian male from 18 to 27 is an army conscript

When Victor Nikiforov turned 18, he was due to be drafted the next April for two years (or for one year after 2008). No one would care he’s a world-famous athlete, no one would let him keep training when he’s in the army. That would be the death of his skating for sure.

So, since it’s evident from his spectacular career that he didn’t actually go to the army, he must have used one of the loopholes to avoid getting drafted, and each loophole adds something to his character.

The easiest way for a world-famous athlete would be to live abroad (non-residents don’t get drafted even if they are Russian citizens), but since he lives in St. Petersburg, he obviously didn’t go for that option (another question is WHY? He must have considered that at some point; avoiding drafting is a primary objective of every Russian boy in St. Petersburg, let alone one whose life would literally be ruined by two years in the army). 

The most likely way of avoiding the army if he decided to stay in Russia was going to college (it’s not called “college” in Russia, but whatever), and then proceeding all the way to the doctorate. One only gets a get-out-of-jailarmy card while he’s getting his education full-time; once he finishes college/university, he gets drafted the next October or April. Unless he gets a doctorate, because then he’s free. Victor would graduate college/university (five or six years, from 17 or 18) at 23, 24 tops, so he had three or four years left to cover after that. Hence, he had to take a post-grad course and there’s a good chance he has a doctorate.

There’s also a chance he got a military degree while in college. That’s an option, too: you sort of double-major and get a military rank at the same time you get your civilian degree. If he used this way out, he’s a reserve sergeant lieutenant. Still can be drafted at any time as an officer, but that never really happens unless there’s a big war (which in Viktor’s lifetime hasn’t happened so far). This option is worse than the first two, because he’s not free once he hits 27.

Other less likely reasons include:

- having a child in his care if there’s no one else to take care of this child. It could be a sibling or a son/daughter, but Victor has to be literally the only one in the world who can legally take care of the child;

- having two or more children - then it doesn’t matter whether or not they have other relatives as long as Victor is the father;

- having a medical reason, but it’s hard think of a medical condition that can be used to avoid the army and still make him well enough for figure skating. Asthma maybe? Diabetes? 

- having a disabled person in his care - once again, there mustn’t be anyone else who can take care of them; 

- having lost a father or a brother in a military conflict - actually, Victor could have a father who died in Afghanistan or an older brother who died in Chechnya.

- having bribed some authorities to make them forget you exist. Seeing it’s Victor Nikiforov we’re talking about, making people forget about him would cost a lot of money. Yakov would totally do that, but would Victor go for it?

There’s also an alternative civilian service, but it’s nearly impossible to get a spot there and in terms of keeping in shape and being able to compete afterwards it’s about as bad as the army.

So. Conscription means there’s something about Victor we don’t know yet. 

Also, Otabek is going through the avoid-the-army dance right now, because it’s pretty much the same way in Kazakhstan, as far as I know. And Yurio is next.


EDIT: Turns out, his is not entirely true. See comments and reblogs for the way it works in the real world for actual Russian athletes - they do, in fact, have more options than ordinary people, which is great for them and sad for fanfiction.

we live in such a horrible and scary time. @ all my russian followers/saint petersburg citizens: please stay strong, stay safe, i hope your families and friends are okay, my thoughts are with you

nytimes.com
BREAKING: Donald Trump Jr., The Donald's eldest son, met with Russian lawyer after being promised damaging information on Clinton
Donald Trump Jr. is said to have arranged the meeting with the Kremlin-linked lawyer during the campaign after he was told he would be provided with details about Hillary Clinton.
By Jo Becker, Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman

Jo Becker, Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman at NYT:

President Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., was promised damaging information about Hillary Clinton before agreeing to meet with a Kremlin-connected Russian lawyer during the 2016 campaign, according to three advisers to the White House briefed on the meeting and two others with knowledge of it.

The meeting was also attended by his campaign chairman at the time, Paul J. Manafort, and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner. Mr. Manafort and Mr. Kushner only recently disclosed the meeting, though not its content, in confidential government documents described to The New York Times.

The Times reported the existence of the meeting on Saturday. But in subsequent interviews, the advisers and others revealed the motivation behind it.

The meeting — at Trump Tower on June 9, 2016, two weeks after Donald J. Trump clinched the Republican nomination — points to the central question in federal investigations of the Kremlin’s meddling in the presidential election: whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Russians. The accounts of the meeting represent the first public indication that at least some in the campaign were willing to accept Russian help.

And while President Trump has been dogged by revelations of undisclosed meetings between his associates and the Russians, the episode at Trump Tower is the first such confirmed private meeting involving members of his inner circle during the campaign — as well as the first one known to have included his eldest son. It came at an inflection point in the campaign, when Donald Trump Jr., who served as an adviser and a surrogate, was ascendant and Mr. Manafort was consolidating power.

It is unclear whether the Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya, actually produced the promised compromising information about Mrs. Clinton. But the people interviewed by The Times about the meeting said the expectation was that she would do so.

In a statement on Sunday, Donald Trump Jr. said he had met with the Russian lawyer at the request of an acquaintance. “After pleasantries were exchanged,” he said, “the woman stated that she had information that individuals connected to Russia were funding the Democratic National Committee and supporting Ms. Clinton. Her statements were vague, ambiguous and made no sense. No details or supporting information was provided or even offered. It quickly became clear that she had no meaningful information.”

He said she then turned the conversation to adoption of Russian children and the Magnitsky Act, an American law that blacklists suspected Russian human rights abusers. The law so enraged Mr. Putin that he retaliated by halting American adoptions of Russian children.

“It became clear to me that this was the true agenda all along and that the claims of potentially helpful information were a pretext for the meeting.” Mr. Trump said.

When he was first asked about the meeting on Saturday, he said only that it was primarily about adoptions and mentioned nothing about Mrs. Clinton.

Mark Corallo, a spokesman for the president’s lawyer, said on Sunday that “the president was not aware of and did not attend the meeting.”

Lawyers and spokesmen for Mr. Kushner and Mr. Manafort did not immediately respond to requests for comment. In his statement, Donald Trump Jr. said he asked Mr. Manafort and Mr. Kushner to attend, but did not tell them what the meeting was about.

American intelligence agencies have concluded that Russian hackers and propagandists worked to tip the election toward Mr. Trump, in part by stealing and then providing to WikiLeaks internal Democratic Party and Clinton campaign emails that were embarrassing to Mrs. Clinton. WikiLeaks began releasing the material on July 22.

A special prosecutor and congressional committees are now investigating the Trump campaign’s possible collusion with the Russians. Mr. Trump has disputed that, but the investigation has cast a shadow over his administration.

[…]

Since the president took office, Donald Trump Jr. and his brother Eric have assumed day-to-day control of their father’s real estate empire. Because he does not serve in the administration and does not have a security clearance, Donald Trump Jr. was not required to disclose his foreign contacts. Federal and congressional investigators have not publicly asked for any records that would require his disclosure of Russian contacts.

Ms. Veselnitskaya is a formidable operator with a history of pushing the Kremlin’s agenda. Most notable is her campaign against the Magnitsky Act, which provoked a Cold War-style, tit-for-tat dispute with the Kremlin when President Barack Obama signed it into law in 2012.

Under the law, some 44 Russian citizens have been put on a list that allows the United States to seize their American assets and deny them visas. The United States asserts that many of them are connected to the fraud exposed by Mr. Magnitsky, who after being jailed for more than a year was found dead in his cell. A Russian human rights panel found that he had been assaulted. To critics of Mr. Putin, Mr. Magnitsky, in death, became a symbol of corruption and brutality in the Russian state.

An infuriated Mr. Putin has called the law an “outrageous act,” and, in addition to banning American adoptions, he compiled what became known as an “anti-Magnitsky” blacklist of United States citizens.

Among those blacklisted was Preet Bharara, then the United States attorney in Manhattan, who led notable convictions of Russian arms and drug dealers. Mr. Bharara was abruptly fired in March, after previously being asked to stay on by Mr. Trump.

amortentiando  asked:

Just go crazy. Just... buy a ticket n get ur plants and sweaters and tell Aryn to get their hair sprays and never look back. Meet halfway through in London and find a job in a cheap cafe and rant a veryvery small place w just enough space for u two to sleep and for the plants and just... live. Cause from all we know we can die tomorrow and things like these can never happen and love deserves to be lived before it's too late. [sorry I knoooow things aren't easy like this you guys just inspire me]

okay so…i know you mean well and probably wish the best for us but this ask ruffled my feathers a bit and i thought i’d tell you why: so here is how the visa process works here (and i’ve gone through it a bunch of times because 99% of countries requires for a russian citizen to have a visa even if you want to visit for just one day) you have to provide a pretty long list of documents to persuade the consulate of the country you’re going to that you won’t stay in their country because they don’t want you there (and i’ve been denied visas before because i was too young/no stable job/not married/no real estate in my possession) if you manage to do that then you have to pay the visa fee (it is non-refundable even if they deny you a visa) which for uk rounds up to ~ 230-1200 pounds depending on how long you wish to stay (then again if they find your reasons or documents insufficient /and their reasons for rejection vary a lot from “you don’t have enough money” to “consular officer was in a bad mood and didn’t like your face”, etc/ they will deny your application) so let’s say i’m going for the longest visa to actually live in the uk (even though let’s face it straight-up they wouldn’t give me one because i don’t have a proper job or any real estate in the uk) then 1200 pounds is approximately 93 thousand rubles - on a good month i earn 15 thousand rubles (8-10 thousand from which go to pay half the rent of our studio) so you can see how suddenly it becomes more and more impossible - more than that having your visa application checked can take up to a month so the phrase “buy a ticket and go” is especially bitter for me. so what i’m trying to say here is this - unfortunately we don’t live in a movie where everything follows this idea that we might die tomorrow so let’s just do whatever we want, life is much more complicated and there are circumstances that wouldn’t fit into a romantic comedy. i’m not here to whine about how hard things are because i’m priviledged enough to go see arin, to hold their hand without being showered with stones for it, to live in a world where i can imagine a future for us. but just…don’t make it sound like all we have to do, all the struggles we have to overcome is buying a plane ticket online and impulsively starting to live together, okay? there are so many more things to this.

This official missive from the Office of the United States President is worth thinking about, even beyond the fact that it shows us how isolated he must be from the workings of government if he still has time to dwell on the campaign.

First, while it shows a third-grade mentality, it reflects his lifelong philosophy on winning. Namely, that if his opponent has not been humiliated and destroyed, the fight isn’t over. This attitude is no secret, he’s talked about it for years. While his spitefulness may be legendary, it has a basis in attempting to frighten people to never challenge him twice, and they usually don’t.

Let’s all pause for a minute to imagine the effect of a person like this in any level of government, or in politics in general. 

Done? OK, let’s move to the next point.

Second, this tweet shows us that the so-called president of the United States does not understand the difference between US & Russian organizations’ involvement in our elections. As almost everyone else in the country already knows, it is not legal for foreign organizations or foreign citizens to provide material support for US election campaigns, but we already knew Trump didn’t. He sent fundraising letters to foreign officials all over the world. Many shared them publicly during the election because they were stunned by its tastelessness and its disdain for American law.

But there is more to this second point, and it’s easy to understand if you think for a few seconds about the world’s wealthy.

For most of them, national borders don’t really exist, except as annoyances or barriers to trade. People like Trump network with other wealthy and powerful people by traveling the world building personal business relationships and trading favors. If they need to make a quick trip to another country, they don’t fly commercial, and they often don’t even need passports. Wealthy narcissists like Trump eventually see that network as their community, because it is. They see governments as either assisting or blocking their own efforts, and they don’t see a country’s citizens much at all.

Trump’s confusion over which countries are US allies has an internal logic when you think of this point of view. For him, all countries’ leaders are competitors of a sort, but all can make bargains. All can be forced to act, and all will operate out of greed. He has no awareness of civic responsibility or of how a governments actions affect its citizens’ lives. These things are completely outside his experience.

Trump cannot mentally relate to our traditional allied leaders any more than he could relate to President Obama. If they are working on complex issues of governance and preparation for their people to to succeed, their actions will make no sense to him whatsoever. However, if they are working to consolidate power and looking for partners in that effort, or if they are wanting to build projects and seeking funding opportunities, he is right there. That is his world.

In this regard, he gets the Russians. He understands their motives on a superficial level, because he understands their basic goals. He sees them as his people, his community. Their ambitions in other countries, such as in Syria or Ukraine, however, are simply not relevant to him. The treatment of Russian citizens by their government does not interest him either, because–like many white conservatives–he does not have any experience with government’s effects on people’s lives beyond his efforts to minimize his own taxes and fines.

The workings of any government, to people like Trump, have always been nothing more than an annoying hindrance. Organizations exist as either opponents or allies, no matter where they are based. There is no understanding of finding common ground, because there is only the immediate deal to close. Patriotism, in a mind like that, becomes nothing more than ethnic/historical boasting, and privilege based on might. 

The idea of America becoming greater than it has been before is an insult to someone who believes that our ethnic/historical dominance is the only thing we need. So we get nostalgia for making it great “again,” and efforts to eliminate those organizations that seek improvement through change, and to eliminate barriers to obscene wealth and power.

Are Serbia and Siberia same??

I’m so tired of this question so here is a little guide for people who are thinking that Serbia and Siberia are the same thing.
First of all, let’s take a look of these hilarious questions and posts:

I’m literally crying! These people deserve an award! 
And now, the moment of truth:

• SIBERIA is a pretty cold and a pretty big region in the Asian part of the Russian Federation, east of the Urals. With an area of 13.1 million square kilometres Siberia accounts for 77% of Russia’s land area, but it is home to just 40 million people. All Siberians are Russian citizens, and of these Russian citizens of Siberia, most are Slavic-origin Russians. 


SERBIA is country located at the crossroads of Central and SE Europe, far away from Russian and Siberia. The country covers a total of 88,361 square kilometres with a total population of 7,186,862. The largest and capital city of Serbia is Belgrade. Serbs are the largest ethnic group in Serbia, representing 83% of the total population.


Unlike Siberia where the winters are really cold and the summers are pleasant, the climate in Serbia is more continental, with cold winters, and hot, humid summers. So I have to disappoint you, but we don’t have tigers in Serbia and I’m not an Eskimo!

That’s all folks, I hope you’ve learned something new! Have a nice day!
Greetings from Siberia, oops I mean, Serbia!

anonymous asked:

Hi, love the AU. I'm curious, why doesn't Mamoru represent Japan? I know he lives and trains in Russia but...i don't know I just thought he'd be on the Japanese team like Yuuri

because he was born and raised in russia so he is a russian citizen. he had double citizenship but for japan you can keep the double citizenship until your 20th birthday, after that you have to chose to keep just one of them.  mamoru is half japanese but he lived in russia his whole life, he wouldn’t give up his russian citizenship just because his father is japanese (that also had been living in russia for more than 20 years now)  
as far as i know the only figure skating skaters that can skate for another country are the ice dance and pair skate ones. it usually happen when you can’t find a good partner (height, built, compatibility) in your country.  one of the two pair skaters may represent a country of which they are not yet a citizen in most competitions, except the olympics which require citizenship. If a skater has previously represented another country, International Skating Union rules bar the skater from 24 months of international competition from the date of his or her last major event for the previous country, or 12 months from a minor event.

a good example about this kind of thing is the USA single figure skater Mirai Nagasu. She was born and raised in USA by both japanese parents who emigrated but are NOT US citizens, but she never skated for Japan. She always represented USA because it’s her birth country and she has US citizenship. 

I hope this clarified the thing ♥ *v*

theguardian.com
British courts may unlock secrets of how Trump campaign profiled US voters
Legal loophole may help academic expose how Big Data firms like Cambridge Analytica and Facebook get their information
By Carole Cadwalladr

“There are so many disturbing aspects to this. One of the things that really troubles me is how the company can buy anonymous data completely legally from all these different sources, but as soon as it attaches it to voter files, you are re-identified. It means that every privacy policy we have ignored in our use of technology is a broken promise. It would be one thing if this information stayed in the US, if it was an American company and it only did voter data stuff.”

But, he argues, “it’s not just a US company and it’s not just a civilian company”. Instead, he says, it has ties with the military through SCL – “and it doesn’t just do voter targeting”. Carroll has provided information to the Senate intelligence committee and believes that the disclosures mandated by a British court could provide evidence helpful to investigators.

Frank Pasquale, a law professor at the University of Maryland, author of The Black Box Society and a leading expert on big data and the law, called the case a “watershed moment”.

“It really is a David and Goliath fight and I think it will be the model for other citizens’ actions against other big corporations. I think we will look back and see it as a really significant case in terms of the future of algorithmic accountability and data protection. These issues are so critical and in the US there are only these incredible, lethargic data laws largely because of the incredible power of the lobbying industry.”

anonymous asked:

are u genuinely communist

yes im a proud russian soviet citizen masquerading in canada you caught me

im extremely socialist but i…dont support dictatorship because thats a totally different thing?? if you dont endorse democratic elections youre fucked

but i do believe in heavy government regulations of industry because frankly without it corporations have shown no qualms exploiting people, countries, and the environment to disaster

i believe in fair taxing and fine penalties in relation to income, and basic income, social aid, schooling, and healthcare

nytimes.com
Trump Team Met With Lawyer Linked to Kremlin During Campaign
The meeting at Trump Tower in Manhattan was arranged by Donald Trump’s eldest son and was attended by Paul Manafort and Jared Kushner.
By Jo Becker, Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman

Jo Becker, Matt Apuzzo, and Adam Goldman at NYT:

Two weeks after Donald J. Trump clinched the Republican presidential nomination last year, his eldest son arranged a meeting at Trump Tower in Manhattan with a Russian lawyer who has connections to the Kremlin, according to confidential government records described to The New York Times.

The previously unreported meeting was also attended by Mr. Trump’s campaign chairman at the time, Paul J. Manafort, as well as the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, according to interviews and the documents, which were outlined by people familiar with them.

While President Trump has been dogged by revelations of undisclosed meetings between his associates and Russians, this episode at Trump Tower on June 9, 2016, is the first confirmed private meeting between a Russian national and members of Mr. Trump’s inner circle during the campaign. It is also the first time that his son Donald Trump Jr. is known to have been involved in such a meeting.

Representatives of Donald Trump Jr. and Mr. Kushner confirmed the meeting after The Times approached them with information about it. In a statement, Donald Jr. described the meeting as primarily about an adoption program. The statement did not address whether the presidential campaign was discussed.

American intelligence agencies have concluded that Russian hackers and propagandists worked to tip the election toward Mr. Trump, and a special prosecutor and congressional committees are now investigating whether his campaign associates colluded with Russians. Mr. Trump has disputed that, but the investigation has cast a shadow over his administration for months.

Mr. Trump has also equivocated on whether the Russians were solely responsible for the hacking. But in Germany on Friday, meeting President Vladimir V. Putin for the first time as president, Mr. Trump questioned him about the hacking. The Russian leader denied meddling in the election.

The Russian lawyer invited to the Trump Tower meeting, Natalia Veselnitskaya, is best known for mounting a multipronged attack against the Magnitsky Act, an American law that blacklists suspected Russian human rights abusers. The law so enraged Mr. Putin that he retaliated by halting American adoptions of Russian children.

The adoption impasse is a frequently used talking point for opponents of the Magnitsky Act. Ms. Veselnitskaya’s campaign against the law has also included attempts to discredit its namesake, Sergei L. Magnitsky, a lawyer and auditor who died in mysterious circumstances in a Russian prison in 2009 after exposing one of the biggest corruption scandals during Mr. Putin’s rule.

Ms. Veselnitskaya is married to a former deputy transportation minister of the Moscow region, and her clients include state-owned businesses and a senior government official’s son, whose company was under investigation in the United States at the time of the meeting. Her activities and associations had previously drawn the attention of the F.B.I., according to a former senior law enforcement official.

[…]

During the campaign, Donald Trump Jr. served as a close adviser to his father, frequently appearing at campaign events. Since the president took office, the younger Mr. Trump and his brother, who have worked for the Trump Organization for most of their adult lives, assumed day-to-day control of their father’s real estate empire.

But a quick internet search would have revealed Ms. Veselnitskaya as a formidable operator with a history of pushing the Kremlin’s agenda. Most notable is her campaign against the Magnitsky Act, which provoked a Cold War-style, tit-for-tat row with the Kremlin when President Barack Obama signed it into law in 2012.

Under the law, some 44 Russian citizens have been put on a list that allows the United States to seize their American assets and deny them visas. The United States asserts that many of them are connected to fraud exposed by Mr. Magnitsky, who after being jailed for more than a year was found dead in his cell. A Russian human rights panel found that he had been assaulted. To critics of Mr. Putin, Mr. Magnitsky, in death, became a symbol of corruption and brutality in the Russian state.

An infuriated Mr. Putin has called the law an “outrageous act,” and, in addition to banning American adoptions, compiled what became known as an “anti-Magnitsky” blacklist of United States citizens.

Among those blacklisted was Preet Bharara, then the United States attorney in Manhattan, who led high-profile convictions of Russian arms and drug dealers. Mr. Bharara was abruptly fired in March, after previously being asked to stay on by Mr. Trump.

One of Ms. Veselnitskaya’s clients is Denis Katsyv, the Russian owner of a Cyprus-based investment company called Prevezon Holdings. He is the son of Petr Katsyv, the vice president of the state-owned Russian Railways and a former deputy governor of the Moscow region. In a civil forfeiture case prosecuted by Mr. Bharara’s office, the Justice Department alleged that Prevezon had helped launder money tied to a $230 million corruption scheme exposed by Mr. Magnitsky by parking it in New York real estate and bank accounts. As a result, the government froze $14 million of its assets. Prevezon recently settled the case for $6 million without admitting wrongdoing.

Ms. Veselnitskaya and her client hired a team of political and legal operatives that has worked unsuccessfully in Washington to repeal the Magnitsky Act. They also tried but failed to keep Mr. Magnitsky’s name off a new law that takes aim at human-rights abusers across the globe.

dailymail.co.uk
Ice dancer Meryl Davis is engaged to beau of six years Fedor Andreev
The figure skater revealed she and her boyfriend are officially engaged by posting on Instagram. In the picture, the Olympic gold medalist flaunted a massive engagement ring on her left hand.

Meryl Davis and Fedor Andreev are taking the next step in their relationship.

On Sunday, the figure skater revealed she and her boyfriend are officially engaged by sharing a sweet snap on Instagram.

In the precious picture, the Olympic gold medalist flaunted a massive engagement ring on her left hand.  

In the image, the 30-year-old’s face is hidden behind a floral baseball cap, but underneath the brim you can see the athlete is all smiles as she hugs her 35-year-old fiance.

But the giant yellow diamond ring was front and center as the shot’s star, boasting a beautiful square cut.

The Michigan native revealed her boyfriend popped the question last week, writing in the caption: ‘• 7/13/17 •’

The dual Russian and Canadian citizen isn’t facing the camera for the sweet snap because he’s too busy embracing his bride-to-be.

The Dancing With The Stars champion and her fellow skater have been together for over six years.

Earlier this year, they took another huge leap in their relationship, announcing they had gotten a mini sheepdoodle dog named Bilbo Baggins.

The happy trio lives together in Birmingham, Michigan.

Fedor is the son of his fiance’s longtime coach, Marina Zoueva, and was also a figure skater.

In 2003, he took home the bronze in single skating at the 2003 Canadian championships, and finished fourth with partner Jana Khokhlova at the 2011 Russian championships before retiring due to injury that September.

Earlier this year, Meryl and her partner, Charlie White, announced they wouldn’t be defending their ice dancing gold medal in the 2018 Olympics, in order to work on their personal lives.

'People ask me now at competitions, do you wish you were out there? After giving it a lot of thought, I always say, no, I feel really good about the capacity I’m here in right now. I think that was really telling for me,’ she said of the break.

In addition to their 2014 gold, the professional pair also earned silver for ice dancing in 2010, and the team bronze in 2014.

It hasn’t actually been illegal to be gay in Russia for more than 20 years. Sure, there’s prejudice, but the actual law–for “propagating homosexual propaganda”–is punishable for Russian citizens by a fine that looks like absolute peanuts to some with an NHL salary.

So what I’m saying is that to the contrary of the fannish convention that if Tater comes out, he can never go home, I’m thinking:

Alexei Mashkov creates a small sensation (and a flashmob) on his honeymoon by strolling through the park with his new husband in Kitay-gorod in downtown Moscow. It is, coincidentally, an incredibly popular gay cruising site. They tangle their fingers together as they walk.

“We wanted to enjoy the beautiful day,” he says to a freelance journalist holding a video camera. He reels his husband in by the back of his jeans as Kent gets carried away in flirting with fans and signing autographs. “We’re just two private citizens enjoying a walk in the park.”

Then he puts a long arm around his husband’s waist and pulls him away from their new friends, waving affably, and walks less than a kilometre to the Red Square so they can get a nice selfie together with the Kremlin in the background to post to Instagram.

Butter wouldn’t melt in his mouth, and he is the smuggest man in all of Russia.

anonymous asked:

What can we do to help the lbtq+ community in Russia ? It's horrible what they are going through

i know i can’t stop thinking about it either and my heart hurts so much.

i just read this article in the huffington post 

with a link to a charity you can donate to here

this is the statement the russian lgbt network’s board gave regarding what’s happening in chechnya:

The Russian LGBT Networks is highly disturbed and concerned about the information on the kidnapping and killing of people in Chechnya because of their sexual orientation. We are also outraged by the reaction of the officials of the Chechen Republic, who in fact justify the killings.  No national and/or religious traditions and norms can justify kidnapping or killing of a human being. Any references to “traditions” to justify kidnappings and killings are amoral and criminal.

The Russian LGBT Network makes every effort to contact the victims and to provide the emergency support. Taking into account the recent statements of the Chechnya officials, we believe that the only thing that can work out is the evacuation. We cooperate closely we the human rights defenders both in Russia and abroad, and ready to evacuate.

On Monday, the Russian LGBT Network will appeal to the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation with two claims. The one is the demand to investigate the information on the crimes, published in “Novaya Gazeta”. Another one is the claim to check whether the public statements of the Chechen officials made on April 1 and justifying the killings, contain the elements of the offence.

We are grateful to everyone who contacted us and asked how they can help. What do we need now?

  • Help us to spread the information about the fact that the Russian LGBT Network is ready to evacuate people. Please think for whom this information can be useful. You can spread the information publicly or personally. Everyone who needs help can contact us by email or call the Hotline (8 800 555 73 74). The call is free all over Russia.
  • In accordance with the Russian legislation, every citizen can apply to the Investigative Committee with the demand to investigate the information about the crime published in mass media. We encourage everyone to apply (the template of the claim will be published tomorrow).

We understand that many people want to help those in need. But please remember that any uncoordinated actions can put in additional danger people in need and those who are ready to help. Therefore, we do not recommend to collect the addresses of people who are ready to provide temporarily shelter.

Be aware, that the situation with the human rights in the North Caucasus is truly difficult. Now people’s lives are endangered and the only way to help is the evacuation. The Russian LGBT Network has the necessary resources to evacuate people, there is a team that already makes every effort to safe lives. That is why we ask everyone to share with us the information about people in need and any offers of assistance.

anonymous asked:

Hey what do you think about Ivan being portrayed as a villain all the time. Personally I could go for a good Agnst every once n' a while but yeah.

Nah, not really all the time. But yeah, MOST of the time, it’s true.

Idk I think it’s because of the general stigma of the country itself that we have seen from lots of medias (I think Stalin played a great part in this stigma tbh, and recently, it’s thanks to Putin) ever since cold war era until now. Though of course the stigma is much milder now compared to back in cold war era.

I mean, I also used to have this stigma about Russia, but thanks to some amazing fics I found from Rus//Ame fandom, I’ve learnt the better about Russia the nation and understand the country’s history is so much more than the “Tyrant” image some of western medias love to portray it. Like, those tyrants are more referring to Russian’s bosses rather than the Russian citizen and their cultures themselves.

I also understand that Hetalia often portrays Ivan in a kind of bad light (his snapped sides like his scary aura, hints of him torturing the Baltics), but at the same time, Himaruya also portrays him as this innocent / doesn’t know any better of a gentle giant. So imo, even though portraying Ivan as a “villain” does hold some truth adhering to canon Hetalia, I think it’s also important to infuse that gentle side of him in his portrayal for the fandom so it could adhere more to the canon portrayal of him.

Like, give some background why he grew up to have jaded personality instead of making him super evil without any background story. Just like Russia who have bloody history thanks to the many tyrant leaders it had. Make him multi dimensional just like Himaruya did instead of making him like cheap villain who does nothing but blindless destruction. Imo that’s the right way to “villainize” any character in any fandom.

anonymous asked:

Maybe I'm incorrect, but how it's portrayed in America is some Russian citizens miss the prestige or international power they had as the Soviet Union, but don't really like much else about the Soviet Union. Do you know if there's any truth to that portrayal?

I think it’s best that Russians answer that question.

That being said, every country that was occupied by Soviet Union at some point or was in it’s sphere of influence has some amount of people who have Soviet Nostalgia, but the approach is different.

For example in Estonia we often either write them off as senile old people or idiots who haven’t opened a history book.

Communism is a topic that has LITERALLY divided families over here.