russell t.davies

It’s difficult with Russell because he doesn’t like spoilers. When we worked together on the show, we tried not to spoil each other. I’m really serious. When I was doing ‘Silence in the Library,’ [he said], ‘I want you to have River Song pre-figure something about what’s going to happen to Donna, and I said, ‘Don’t tell me what’s going to happen to Donna!’ And I said, ‘What kind of thing is it?’ ‘It’s sad, Steven. It’s very very sad.’ I said, ‘OK OK, I’ll put something sad in.’ Julie Gardner was sitting there saying, ‘You’re working on the same TV show. You can’t behave like this.’
—  Steven Moffat
I tune in to watch [Doctor Who] every week, I never miss it. Obviously my friends are making it but they never tell me what’s coming up so it’s a surprise every week. It’s like when I was young again. I got the job at Doctor Who because I was a fan and then I used to watch it as a surprise every week so I’ve gone back to when I was 14.
—  Russell T Davies, Mirror Online
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Behind the Scenes of The Runaway Bride - Part Six

Excerpts from Benjamin Cook’s “Things We Learned This Christmas” article in DWM 378

  • Russell T Davies is nine foot tall, according to BBC Radio Wales
  • But he isn’t remotely scared of spiders. “Cardiff Bay is a breeding ground in the Summer,” he bemoans. “You end up crawling with bloody spiders. Leave your window open at night, and you wake up webbed! I’m fed up of them, and this is my revenge.”  The Runaway Bride is all Cardiff-inspired, then? “Yes. Next year, it’ll be Doctor Who and the Speed Bumps!
  • Interviewing Euros Lyn as he makes his way up a mountain in Dublin isn’t as hard as you might think. “I’m filming a show for the BBC,” he explains, “about a policeman who wants to avenge his wife’s murder.”
  • When Donna tries to hail a cab, the script specifies: ‘Fast and zippy sequence. Music like Yello’s The Race.’ However, Murray Gold composed a Yello-inspired orchestral piece.
  • David Tennant only pretends to be Scottish for a wacky gimmick. Really he’s Welsh. Honest!

Other parts of this photoset:  [ one ] [ two ] [ three ] [ four ] [ five ]
[ List of all my Doctor Who Behind-the-Scenes photosets ]

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Just a short powerpoint on some of the reasons why you should try watching torchwood.

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Behind the Scenes of The Poison Sky / The Sontaran Stratagem (Part Five)

Excerpts from the DVD Commentary with David Tennant, Russell T. Davies, and producer Susie Liggat:

RTD: Do you know, I’ve always wanted to ask you, David.  When you get a script what do you do?  From scratch
DT: I read it.
RTD: Yeah, but…
DT: I just read it to read it the first time.  And then I’ll read it and I’ll usually mark it up, which is literally just underlining my bits
RTD: Yep yep yep
DT: Which is the first stage of learning it, I suppose, and then you just read it again and you go over certain scenes.  Depending upon how much time you’ve got, whether it’s a script that you’ve had a few weeks in advance or whether it’s one of the ones that creep in at the last minute
RTD:  [laughs] Like they do
DT: …for whatever reason.  Sometimes you have to sort of just buckle down and start learning specific scenes if a schedule is in front of you…
RTD: Do you have to learn it according to the schedule
DT: Yeah, you do.
RTD: Sort of going, “Right, all of the UNIT scenes are first so I’ll learn those first”
DT: Yeah, yeah
RTD: That’s hard, isn’t it?
DT: Well, it’s easier than just learning it chronologically, because you’re just kind of keeping up with the schedule as it comes
RTD: Because it always strikes me, and actually everyone always says this, that you come to read-throughs incredibly prepared.  Do you, or are you winging it?
DT: Weeellll, it’s somewhere between the two, I think.  I think probably as the years have gone on, I enjoy winging it a bit more
RTD: Right
DT: Because I think it can be a bit more… sometimes you can over-prepare things, I think.
RTD: Yep
DT: and I think when we started I think I probably, sort of, would come to the read-through having practiced
[ RTD & SL laugh ]
DT: having made some decisions.  As time goes on it’s better sometimes to… especially when you’re meeting actors for the first time and responding to what they do for the first time, if you’re less… Because the first read-through, you’re sitting there thinking… and everyone… all the BBC bods come up from London… and we did three scripts!  We did The Christmas Invasion, New Earth, and School Reunion in one day and I’d never read The Doctor out loud before
SL: [ gasps ] How frightening!
DT: …and there’s all these people, all these bods coming up from London to kind of… and you’re just sitting there thinking, “I’m going to get sacked!”
RTD: [ big laugh ]
DT: That’s all you’re thinking.  So you’re very precious about it, and I think as time goes on you begin to feel slightly more confident of your position, and you think, well, it’s more interesting, actually, to maybe be a bit looser with it.  A bit freer with it.
RTD: And when do you learn the lines?  Is it late at night?  Is it first thing?  
DT: Just as you go.  Weekends a lot… you know.
SL: Because you are extraordinary.  I can say, I’ve worked with you now virtually solidly for four years - on Casanova and then on to this…
DT: Yeah, yeah. That’s true, that’s true
SL: …so I have seen HOURS of television with you
[ DT & RTD laugh at how she dragged out the word “hours” ]
DT: Hours of it!  
RTD: Sound a bit happier about that!
SL: Hours of Russell’s great writing!
[ waiting for the laughing to die down ]
SL: No! What I’m going to say is, I think in all that time, in all those days and all those lines, I think you’ve probably fluffed twice. You know, it’s extraordinary, you are extraordinary.  
RTD: That’s cursed it!
DT: Yeah!
SL:  No! You really are - at learning your lines
RTD: You are, that’s true
DT: It’s the homework, isn’t it?  You’ve got to do the homework.
SL: Well, you say that but you know some people don’t.  It’s brilliant - you are a great leader by example.
DT: I think you’ve got to. I think we’re in such a privileged position, and I don’t want cameramen standing around waiting for me to remember my lines, you know?
RTD: But also it is a skill of yours, actually.  Actors who have learned their lines, who’ve done all the work, can fluff on the spot
DT: Sure, and sometimes we all do, yeah
RTD: Yeah, but you do it less than most.  Now we’ve cursed it - it will all just go to pot!
DT: Yeah!  Tomorrow’s going to be a really long day!
RTD: Never speak about it out loud. 

A big “thank you!!” to everyone who shares set photos

Additional parts of this photoset: [ one ] [ two ] [ three ] [ four ]
The rest of the behind-the-scenes photosets are available [ here ]

RTD fans....you might want to watch “Doctor Who“ again

I know a lot of people have kind of fallen off the Doctor Who boat since Moffat has been showrunner. We all have our reasons—we don’t connect with his characters; we miss the warm, emotional aspects of Russell T Davies’s stories; we’re tired of timey-wimey nonsense. I get all of that, totally, because I’ve had a lot of problems with Moffat’s showrunning style as well. It’s felt like a struggle to keep watching, sometimes.

But if you’ve given up on Who, I would strongly encourage you to give it another chance right now. The new companion, Bill, has just been introduced, but I already adore her. She has all the real-world grounding I’ve missed, she’s smart, she’s as well-rounded and alive and beautiful as Donna or Martha or Rose. She is a tender character, with weakness and flaws and great strengths. And the show is clearly centered on her, more than any plot madness or the Doctor’s enigmatic reputation. The show feels totally new—watching “The Pilot” felt like the show had reinvented itself before my eyes. There are still a few issues, but overall, I want to watch Doctor Who again. No, in fact, I’m delighted to.

So, if you’re an RTD fan—or just a fan who abandoned the show—please give the show another shot. Bill is worth it. She really is.

Created by Russell T Davies as a spin-off from Doctor Who, Torchwood was a science fiction series where all the regular cast were unashamedly pansexual. Queer characters were never portrayed as victims, and it never judged or punished them for their sexuality. It is also - to date - the only action TV series with an unquestionably bisexual leading man. Torchwood was a world where queer people weren’t the hero’s best friend - they were the heroes. And no one was more heroic than Captain Jack.
—  The only reason you need to go and watch Torchwood. (Gay Times Magazine, October 2016 issue.