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#Yoda uses #theforce to raise the crashed ship out of the Swamp. #LukeSkywalker says “I don’t believe it.” #MasterYoda replies “That is why you fail.” - Beliefs can #empower us or cage us in forever. Beliefs are that powerful. I once heard a sad story. There was an elephant at a circus that was chained to a pole as an infant. He tried to break away, but was not strong enough too. Over time, he became monstrous. One day, the circus accidentally caught on fire, and the elephant died. He was enormous, and could have easily ripped the pole out of the ground to run away to safety, but there was a SELF-LIMITING BELIEF IN HIS MIND that told him he would not be able to do it, and so he didn’t even try. Do you understand the impact your beliefs can have on your life? I hope you understand that even though you may not be able to see how or why (just like the elephant), they have the ability to #transform your life. #4biddenknowledge

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Though he’d asked for them, Cas found Sam’s words near impossible to believe. He raised his hand in a half-hearted wave, watching the taillights of your cab pull away.

You waited until you were out of sight to let the tears fall. Your heart felt heavier, pulled tighter and tighter until it felt you couldn’t breathe, with every second taking you further from Cas.

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NEW! Lumenus - Clothing Designed To Save Your Life

Lumenus is revolutionary smart clothing designed specifically to keep you safe in traffic. You’ll be properly lit without looking silly. In fact, Lumenus clothing looks pretty good, and it’s seen as the future of apparel. This clothing is designed for every day to really make you shine. Primarily designed for cyclists, this safety apparel is now evolved for other users including commuters, runners, and motorists. Back this Kickstarter project!

A Copper Bedrail Could Cut Back On Infections For Hospital Patients

Checking into a hospital can boost your chances of infection. That’s a disturbing paradox of modern medical care.

And it doesn’t matter where in the world you’re hospitalized. From the finest to the most rudimentary medical facilities, patients are vulnerable to new infections that have nothing to do with their original medical problem. These are referred to as healthcare-acquired infections, healthcare-associated infections or hospital-acquired infections. Many of them, like pneumonia or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), can be deadly.

The World Health Organization estimates that “each year, hundreds of millions of patients around the world are affected” by healthcare-acquired infections. In the United States, the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in the Health and Human Services Department estimates that 1 in 25 inpatients has a hospital-related infection. In developing countries, estimates run higher.

Hospital bed safety railings are a major source of these infections. That’s what Constanza Correa, 33, and her colleagues have found in their research in Santiago, Chile. They’ve taken on the problem by replacing them, since 2013, with railings made of copper, an anti-microbial element.

Copper definitely wipes out microbes. “Bacteria, yeasts and viruses are rapidly killed on metallic copper surfaces, and the term "contact killing” has been coined for this process,“ wrote the authors of an article on copper inApplied and Environmental Microbiology. That knowledge has been around a very long time. The journal article cites an Egyptian medical text, written around 2600-2000 B.C., that cites the use of copper to sterilize chest wounds and drinking water.

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Photo: A copper bedrail can kill germs on contact. (Courtesy of CopperBioHealth)

A Copper Bedrail Could Cut Back On Infections For Hospital Patients

Checking into a hospital can boost your chances of infection. That’s a disturbing paradox of modern medical care.

And it doesn’t matter where in the world you’re hospitalized. From the finest to the most rudimentary medical facilities, patients are vulnerable to new infections that have nothing to do with their original medical problem. These are referred to as healthcare-acquired infections, healthcare-associated infections or hospital-acquired infections. Many of them, like pneumonia or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), can be deadly.

The World Health Organization estimates that “each year, hundreds of millions of patients around the world are affected” by healthcare-acquired infections. In the United States, the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in the Health and Human Services Department estimates that 1 in 25 inpatients has a hospital-related infection. In developing countries, estimates run higher.

Hospital bed safety railings are a major source of these infections. That’s what Constanza Correa, 33, and her colleagues have found in their research in Santiago, Chile. They’ve taken on the problem by replacing them, since 2013, with railings made of copper, an anti-microbial element.

Copper definitely wipes out microbes. “Bacteria, yeasts and viruses are rapidly killed on metallic copper surfaces, and the term "contact killing” has been coined for this process,“ wrote the authors of an article on copper in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. That knowledge has been around a very long time. The journal article cites an Egyptian medical text, written around 2600-2000 B.C., that cites the use of copper to sterilize chest wounds and drinking water.

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Here’s a great reminder to have at least a few sips of coffee in the morning before starting to make breakfast. You don’t ever want to mistake a carton of Cage-Free Xenomorph Eggs for perfectly harmless chicken eggs. It only takes one freshly-hatched Alien facehugger to ruin your breakfast, followed by the rest of your newly-shortened life.

NECA recently shared this preview image of an awesome set of six Alien eggs, three unhatched and three already open with tiny facehuggers bursting forth. They come in a carton printed with “safe handling instructions.” Of course, by the time you read their instructions, all hopes of personal safety have gone out the window. Still, it’s thoughtful of them to try.

[via io9]

I really don’t understand why everyone is freaking out/getting mad at 5sos for telling people to hop the barrier like artists do this shit all the time??? 

Here’s the Akon concert I went to where he told everyone to hop the barrier and I did it with a fucking broken shoulder like this isn’t anything new for artists to do this shit. It’s up to the fans to take care of themselves and hold themselves responsible for what happens if an artist tells them to hop the barrier. No one is fucking forcing you to do it and if you don’t want to, don’t! And if you do, stay fucking safe!!! Don’t push, don’t shove, don’t run!!! Your safety is NOT the artists responsibility. 

And also, IMO, y’all are blowing Calum’s first tweet way out of proportion. If you know you’re claustrophobic and are prone to getting anxiety attacks in large crowds, concerts really are not for you. People push, people scream, people shove, and people freak out. Making 5sos responsible for your safety/mental health is NOT fair to them at all. All they wanted was to get closer to the fans and make sure everyone had a good time. Calum wasn’t trivializing anxiety or claiming that if you have anxiety, you shouldn’t go to concerts period, he’s making a point that if a concert could be a possible unsafe/trigger environment, it’s your responsibility to take care of yourself. 

It’s all fun and games until...

The top flap on the big box came down and Simon felt the need to run for his life.  River saw Simon bolt and looked like she was thinking, “What did I miss?" 

After I fixed the box flap, Simon decided that the whole set-up required a safety inspection.  It took him a few minutes to army crawl up to the boxes before deeming them fit to play in again. 

River, completely unphased by the box flap drama, immediately hopped up onto the small box to survey her kingdom.  Simon, ever the cautious one, kept circling the boxes to be sure that they didn’t eat his sister.