running in the mountains

How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: Don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “You’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say, “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

—  Sarah Koppelkam

i know like People Have Types and shit and dont get me wrong i have types but also like there are so many Types of Amazing girls…. someone says pastel fairy queen aesthetic? im gay. emo goth princess look? im gay. rugged tough can-bench-you look? im gay. small town farm girl? im gay. softhearted butch with killer style? im gay. tacky lesbian with flannel, athletic shorts, and socks with burks? im gay. long lanky girls who are a foot taller than you? im gay. sporty girl who will somehow convince you to run up mountain hiking trails with her? im gay. 50s james dean looking lesbians? im gay

in short, im gay

*this post is 100% inclusive of trans girls who fit any and all of the above Looks, terfs don’t touch!!!*

Words I associate the signs with:

Aries: powerful, manipulative, energetic, high spirited, optimistic, potent, conflagration, confidence, yelling, arguments, warmth, sun, fire, sparkles, hazel, force, sports, kickboxing, heart-eyes, exquisite, allusion, white lies, sexiness, dominance uprising, gobsmacked, beatinest, fights, sounder, lively, lighters, nicotine, ambiguous, judging, craving

Taurus: reliable, responsible, hard working, material, money, honest, loyal, practical, solidarity, stubborn, content, possessive, uncompromising, unconditional, complications, brown, green, changes, ground, jobs, gardening, cooking, stability, hands, high quality objects, value, easy-going, wholehearted, raw, purity

Gemini: ambivalent, thinker, two faced, overthinking, unlabeled, writers, cantankerous, words, poems, tongue, speaking, lips, curling, tea, mornings, dawn, breezes, spring, breathing, laughter, mysteries, puzzles, unraveling, ominous, paradox, yin yang, opposites, doublethink, pieces, two pieces of one whole

Cancer: moon, water, moonlight, sea, water, feelings, moodiness, dangerous, helpless, hopelessly, art, forgiving, assuming, tears, loneliness, emptiness, mental illness, feathers, birds, animals, home, family, children, society, psychological studies, stars, astrology, poems, artists, watercolor, pastel colors, insecurity, apothecary, apologizing

Leo: self esteem, confidence, labels, blazing, lion, roaring, light, names, assumptions, chide, conflict, coruscant, flowers, amaranthine, dimes, diamonds, mining, flashing, paramour, lover, affair, honesty, positivity, generosity, creativity, humor, jokes, cheerful, arrogance, inflexibility, stubborn

Virgo: analyzing, suppressing, shyness, kindness, loyalist, hardworking, practical, overly critical, insecure, judging, books, cleaning, studies, school, numbers, sotto voce, languages, wonders, holding on, stable, furniture, shops, medical, doctors, nurses, down-to-earth, feasible, doable, handy, functionality, finances

Libra: harmonious, music, instruments, pens, poetry, writing, extrovert, popular, cooperative, problem solving, diplomatic, gracious, delicate, social, fair-minded, justice, gentleness, talking with others, outlets, outdoors, nature, hugs, warmth, solace, family, kindness

Scorpio: death, ominous, paradox, mystery, inevitability, serene, seriousness, darkness, craters, abyss, heartache, breakups, ferociousness, deflorating, roses, wilting, sex, divagating, pelvis, lovers, one night stands, dominance, kinks, puzzles, complex, rawness, honesty, loyalty, incredulous, decreasing, schadenfreude, serendipity, imperfections, sibylline, staring

Sagittarius: traveling, world maps, cities, villages, culture, rounded figures, running, sports, mountains, lightheaded, breezy, go with the flow, airplanes, leaving, disappearing, walking, wandering, stubbornness, adventure, games, young love, long distance relationships, distance, lights, fireflies, discoveries, camping, firewood

Capricorn: practical, hardworking, finances, jobs, money, self control, managing, forceful, unforgiving, know-it-all, knowledge, smartness, discipline, discussions, reliable, expecting the worst, tradition, family, status, different, underrated, underdog, quality, craftsmanship, time

Aquarius: independence, friendship, temperamental, in the moment, running, disappearance, progressive, original, different, humanitarian, helpful, aloof, frightful, emotionless, numb, running from emotions, self control, determination, apitude, funny, self discovery

Pisces: drugs, wondering, wishing, hoping, imagination, shyness, darkness, abysses, mental illnesses, incomparable, incapable, insecurity, psychologically, dreams, hallucinations, allegory, bruises, bonding, pellucid, helpless, colorful, helplessness, craving, anxiety, anxious, nervousness, feeling too much, sadness, good friendship, manipulative

It is easy to love running on good days. It is much harder to love it when you pant after first kilometres. When your sports bra won’t stay in the place. Your legs still hurt from the previous run. It is too cold/hot/windy/rainy. You feel like shit. Or you just had a really bad day and running is the last thing you feel like doing. But those days are the most important because that’s when you are growing stronger.

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

Our solar system is a jewel box filled with a glittering variety of beautiful worlds–and not all of them are planets. This week, we present our solar system’s most marvelous moons.

1. Weird Weather: Titan

Saturn’s hazy moon Titan is larger than Mercury, but its size is not the only way it’s like a planet. Titan has a thick atmosphere, complete with its own “water cycle” – except that it’s way too cold on Titan for liquid water. Instead, rains of liquid hydrocarbons like ethane and methane fall onto icy mountains, run into rivers, and gather into great seas. Our Cassini spacecraft mapped the methane seas with radar, and its cameras even caught a glimpse of sunlight reflecting off the seas’ surface. Learn more about Titan: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/science/titan/

2. Icy Giant: Ganymede

Jupiter’s moon Ganymede is the largest in the solar system. It’s bigger than Mercury and Pluto, and three-quarters the size of Mars. It’s also the only moon known to have its own magnetic field. Details: solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/ganymede/indepth

3. Retrograde Rebel: Triton

Triton is Neptune’s largest moon, and the only one in the solar system to orbit in the opposite direction of its planet’s rotation, a retrograde orbit. It may have been captured from the Kuiper Belt, where Pluto orbits. Despite the frigid temperatures there, Triton has cryovolcanic activity – frozen nitrogen sometimes sublimates directly to gas and erupts from geysers on the surface. More on Triton: solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/triton/indepth

4. Cold Faithful: Enceladus

The most famous geysers in our solar system (outside of those on Earth) belong to Saturn’s moon Enceladus. It’s a small, icy body, but Cassini revealed this world to be one of the solar system’s most scientifically interesting destinations. Geyser-like jets spew water vapor and ice particles from an underground ocean beneath the icy crust of Enceladus. With its global ocean, unique chemistry and internal heat, Enceladus has become a promising lead in our search for worlds where life could exist. Get the details: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/science/enceladus/

5. Volcano World: Io

Jupiter’s moon Io is subjected to tremendous gravitational forces that cause its surface to bulge up and down by as much as 330 feet (100 m). The result? Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System, with hundreds of volcanoes, some erupting lava fountains dozens of miles high. More on Io’s volcanoes: solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/io/indepth

6. Yin and Yang Moon: Iapetus

When Giovanni Cassini discovered Iapetus in 1671, he observed that one side of this moon of Saturn was bright and the other dark. He noted that he could only see Iapetus on the west side of Saturn, and correctly concluded that Iapetus had one side much darker than the other side. Why? Three centuries later, the Cassini spacecraft solved the puzzle. Dark, reddish dust in Iapetus’s orbital path is swept up and lands on the leading face of the moon. The dark areas absorb energy and become warmer, while uncontaminated areas remain cooler. Learn more: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/2892/cassini-10-years-at-saturn-top-10-discoveries/#nine

7. A Double World: Charon and Pluto

At half the size of Pluto, Charon is the largest of Pluto’s moons and the largest known satellite relative to its parent body. The moon is so big compared to Pluto that Pluto and Charon are sometimes referred to as a double planet system. Charon’s orbit around Pluto takes 6.4 Earth days, and one Pluto rotation (a Pluto day) takes 6.4 Earth days. So from Pluto’s point of view Charon neither rises nor sets, but hovers over the same spot on Pluto’s surface, and the same side of Charon always faces Pluto. Get the details: www.nasa.gov/feature/pluto-and-charon-new-horizons-dynamic-duo

8. “Death Star” Moon: Mimas

Saturn’s moon Mimas has one feature that draws more attention than any other: the crater Herschel, which formed in an impact that nearly shattered the little world. Herschel gives Mimas a distinctive look that prompts an oft-repeated joke. But, yes, it’s a moon. More: olarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/mimas

9. Don’t Be Afraid, It’s Just Phobos

In mythology, Mars is a the god of war, so it’s fitting that its two small moons are called Phobos, “fear,” and Deimos, “terror.” Our Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter caught this look at Phobos, which is roughly 17 miles (27 km) wide. In recent years, NASA scientists have come to think that Phobos will be torn apart by its host planet’s gravity. Details: www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/phobos-is-falling-apart

Learn more about Phobos: solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/phobos/indepth

10. The Moon We Know Best

Although decades have passed since astronauts last set foot on its surface, Earth’s moon is far from abandoned. Several robotic missions have continued the exploration. For example, this stunning view of the moon’s famous Tycho crater was captured by our Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which continues to map the surface in fine detail today. More: www.lroc.asu.edu/posts/902

Discover more lists of 10 things to know about our solar system HERE.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com