rune symbols

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I feel like Rune Magic doesn’t get enough credit or recognition in the modern Pagan world and it really should. Runes are so easy to use, are great for beginners and experts alike. I’ve scanned a few Runes in here with their power and how to apply that power. Keep in mind you can use Runes in any way you feel comfortable. Sometimes, I just draw a Rune on my hand, that way I’m reminded of my spell or wish nearly every moment. Runes are the perfect visualization tool. Put them to good use!

Domestic Garden Witch: When Eggshells Grow

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Eggshells for the Garden Witch

The kitchen witch has eggshells piling up on the counter, dried and ready to be ground up for use in protection powders. The garden witch looks at these shells and thinks, “Oh! Fertilizer!”

But if you’re limited in space and have to keep your garden limited to your windowsill, you may find yourself looking at those eggshells and saying “Oh! New pottery!” Not only is creating an eggshell planter a very green practice, but it’s also creative and makes transplanting much easier if you end up having a larger garden later on!

The Container…

Simple enough, you just need mostly intact eggshells. In the picture above, the eggshells are kept in the carton, but I’ve seen eggshells set up decoratively, such as with this picture:

The core of this post is clearly the eggshells, but you can arrange them in whatever way saves space or is aesthetically pleasing!

Carefully fill the emptied eggshell with potting soil. Make an indent in the soil with your finger, and carefully add your seedling before adding a final layer of soil and watering. If you plan on keeping the plants in the eggshells instead of transplanting, you could also carefully poke holes in the bottom of the eggshells so that your plants don’t get over-watered.

How Can I Witch This?

Eggshells alone are extremely protective, and providing your plants with that energy is beneficial. Around Ostara, use died eggshells! Not only will the shells have protective energy, but you’ll be able to use color correspondences and whatever symbols you used for the rite.

Draw symbols or runes of growth, protection, and strength on the shells in order to encourage your plant’s growth!

Bonus points is if you grow protective herbs in the eggshells!

May your harvests always be fruitful!
Blessed Be! )O(

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etsyfindoftheday 1 | 5.29.17

dramatic talisman necklaces by taxilhoax

dark, mystic vibes permeate from this shop — how rad are their metal-and-gemstone talismans?! these necklace styles look like they carry a hidden power ready to be released. my friend sam’s pal handmakes all of these jewelry pieces in her little cabin in lake tahoe, CA – check out the rest of taxilhoax’s shop today!

Everyday Witchcraft

1. Meditate - still the mind, the breath, the heartbeat, open a channel through which the spirits can communicate if they wish to, listen.

2. Walk - honour the genii loci, notice the changing seasons, observe signs and omens, traverse the kingdoms of humanity, flora and fauna, give aid where it is needed.

3. Divine - build relationships with divinatory tools, sharpen skills, train intuition, ask questions, receive answers.

4. Invoke - the presence of spirits to assist in tasks, to protect on journeys, to grant guidance, maintain connections and uphold contracts.

5. Craft - use the hands to create, to construct, imbue each creation with spirit and purpose, a meal, a potion, a carving, a weaving, enchant the mundane and material.

6. Sing - the old songs, the power songs, the prayers, the chants, to heal, to awaken, to enforce, to ward, sing the sun to sleep and the moon to rising, sing in the bath, at the hearth, in the heart.

7. Read - widely and deeply, old and new, academic and popular, across boundaries and taboos, slowly and with full attention, take notes, research, reflect.

8. Write - record experiences, practices, thoughts. keep journals and grimoires, spellbooks and scripts, remember, elucidate, illuminate.

9. Draw - sigils and runes, symbols and signs. Carve, paint, scratch, blacken, redden, scrawl, in the sand, with salt, in the air, with chalk, ink, blood, charcoal, the mind.

10. Collect - herbs, woods, stones, feathers, bones, teeth, soil, the raw materials of natural magic, fill jars, boxes, bags, gather, forage, wildcraft, thrift, take that which is discarded, value the found over the bought.

11. Observe - the cycles of moon, sun, planets, stars, take heed with the eyes as well as the almanac, feel the sap rise, the birds migrate, the bulbs awaken, the leaves wither.

12. Renew - old spells, old wards, protections, and boundaries. Clean what is obscured, recast what has weakened, maintain what is working, replace what is lost. Tie up loose ends.

13. Communicate - with everything, stones, trees, spirits, the dead, that which grows in the garden and that which visits it, other practitioners, mentors, students, seekers, the younger self, the higher self, the wyrd. 

Domestic Garden Witch: Orange You Glad You Saved That Peel?

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

I’ve Got a Peeling!

If you’re not the kind of witch I am (the kind that looks at a citrus peel and sees zest to be added to food), and you tend to juice fruits or occasionally cut open a lime for tequila, then chances are you frequently compost or toss the leftover rinds. This is an alternative to that, which is particularly useful for starting up your own herb garden.

Cut the ends off of your fruit (it can be any kind of thick-rind citrus, such as orange, grapefruit, lemon, or lime) in such a way as to flatten the ends without cutting into the flesh. Then cut the fruit in half and remove the flesh for juicing, eating, et cetera. If you then cut a small hole in the flattened end for drainage, you can proceed to fill the makeshift pot with soil, add a seed, and water.

Allow the seedling to grow until it is time to transplant. Then simply plant the whole thing in a garden. The rind will decompose, fertilizing your plant (an excellent source of nitrogen and additional nutrients) and avoiding waste.

How Can I Witch This?

The possibilities here are similar to many container gardens, but there’s a little extra fun that you can have with citrus rinds. Unlike terra cotta or ceramic, citrus peels can be carved. Adding runes and symbols are made easier because of this and if you carve them into the fruit and allow the fruit to heal a bit before using it, you can add additional time and intent to it.

Depending  upon the intent, you may also want to coordinate the type of fruit with the type of spell. For instance, orange peels can promote happiness, healing, and can add a solar association to the garden.

In Conclusion…

Though a simple project, it has a lot of potential in magic and also has a lot of potential in saving money and resources for the student witch. It saves space (something that is also helpful for the student witch), and is a green alternative to other seed starters. Because it is rich in nutrients, it also makes an ideal fertilizer when transplanted.

When getting your garden started, try enhancing your plants’ health and yield by planting the seeds in enchanted citrus peels!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O(

alright so i found this necklace a few years ago at an antique bizarre thing happening in my town but i could never figure out what the symbol was or where it came from. it only just occurred to me now that someone on here might know its origins/what it means. so if anyone knows or has any ideas please do tell! id really appreciate it!

The Domestic Garden Witch: Pocket-Sized Green Thumb

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

An Excuse to Have More Wine!

Okay, so this is a cute and somewhat family oriented garden. It breaks away from the more meditation-oriented garden from last week, and strays away from the initial intensity of terrariums. But it sticks to the simplicity and ease of care that you would have with any succulents!

With midterms and various other tests plaguing our college witches, there’s sure to be plenty of wine being consumed in order to ease that tension. (Or, if you’re like me, your excuse for having a lot of wine is the fact that you “cook” with it.) Regardless, corks are often seen as nothing more than a tedious obstacle blocking your way to the delicious and happy-inducing fermented grape juice inside the bottle. Well, to most folks, anyway… I’ll leave the significance of corks in wine bottling to one of my kitchen witchery posts. So when all is said and done, many corks end up just being thrown away by the end of the night.

Succulents come in a range of shapes, colors, and sizes, from the massive saguaro to the tiny rock plants. But what makes them so easy to care for is the fact that often they can easily root from clippings and they require very little water in order to survive.

Corks, meanwhile, are great at maintaining low levels of moisture for extended periods of time, providing an ideal potting source for succulents. As such, it only makes sense to bring a bit of green into the home by using the corks as a pot!

You Know the Drill…

All you need (aside from the wine) is a cork, a drill with two bits (a quarter inch bit and a smaller bit for making a leading hole), potting soil, a little bit of aquarium gravel, and some clippings from small succulents.

Using the smaller bit, drill a leading hole into the cork, being careful to avoid drilling all the way through it. Then, use the larger bit to widen the hole so as to turn your cork into a miniature pot. Add a little bit of potting soil, followed by your clipping. Add a little more soil and gently tamp it down to secure the clipping into place, and decorate with a little bit of aquarium gravel. It’s as simple as that!

A common use for these plants is to glue a magnet to the back, allowing the succulents to serve as living refrigerator magnets. For me, I see these adorable little succulents being great gifts or even cute decorations for the small dorm room.

As I’ve mentioned, not much care is needed beyond watering every ten days or so. You can use a dropper to administer the water, or carefully use a small spoon to apply water.

How Can I Witch This?

Succulents vary greatly in their magickal uses. Jade plants are exceptional for inviting wealth into the home, whereas agave is great for attracting sweet and positive energies. Coordinate your plants with what your intent is. The cork itself can be decorated with runes, sigils, symbols, et cetera, or can even be studded with crystals!

If you’re going for the magnet idea, you can take a green spin on the concept of crystal grids, and instead create a succulent grid right there on your refrigerator, using the intent from the plants to attract the energies you want much in the same way as you would arrange crystals!

As mentioned before, these little plants make for great gifts, and therefore can be used as spells for others, as well. Aloe for healing, or jade for prosperity, et cetera.

If you’re trying to practice discreetly, these plants are a great way to do so!

And lastly, you can place crystals in the bottom of the hole you’ve drilled to correspond to the intent of the plant or to encourage health for the plant. This is a great way to practice a little bit of garden witchery in a very small setting!

Play around and get creative with the different ways that you can work with these little succulents to brighten your dorm or window!

May your harvests always be bountiful!

Blessed Be! )O(

The Domestic Garden Witch: Souper Recycling Ideas!

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Soup and Coffee Tins? Perfect!

So spring break is over and students all over the country are hunkering down for another quarter (or semester) of frantic studying, testing, and praying for sleep while pulling all-nighters. However, what’s likely also on the minds of these students is the need to have access to fresh ingredients on a budget. Well, college witches, search no more!

Chances are that in packing up some food for your dorm, you’ve also managed to amass a sizeable collection of soup cans and coffee tins. Whether your diet is exclusively cold Spaghetti-O’s and coffee or if you’ve just never gotten rid of the can from your sick day chicken noodle soup, these tin cans are useful as seed starters, herb planters, and rustic decoration.

Like any container garden, the process is simple. Carefully puncture a few drainage holes at the bottom of the can, provide a layer of gravel, add soil and seedlings/seeds, and water. But the fun is in what you can do to make these little DIY planters have a bit of personality! For that, we jump straight to some witchy talk!

How Can I Witch This?

I know, this container seems fairly self-explanatory. Sigils, symbols, runes and whatnot painted or drawn on the can to promote health and whatever else the plant corresponds to, and crystals added to the soil for the same reason. But I wanted to take a step back and consider the container itself for a moment.

In previous Domestic Garden Witch articles, I’ve focused on what you can do with the containers rather than what the containers might link to in witchcraft. In this case, I would like to change that. Tin cans, while inexpensive, are produced today not from tin (usually), but from aluminum or steel. Depending upon what the can stores, it could also be tin-plate steel. Regardless, these metals have some influence in what you can do on a magical level.

First, tin is a wonderful metal with a bit of history in witchcraft. In many traditions, it is most strongly associated with healing, prosperity, and money spells. Consider growing plants such as basil or rosemary in containers made with tin, allowing the metal to correspond with the uses of these herbs in your spells.

Aluminum is inexpensive, fairly plentiful these days, and actually does have a use in modern witchcraft despite its lack of historical magical attributes. Today, it can most often be associated with thriftiness, reflection, malleability, and travel. If you’re looking to work spells which encourage financial responsibility, or introspective thought, consider using aluminum cans with the appropriate plants and crystals.

Man has used steel quite a bit throughout history, and while we tend to have a stronger bond with iron (iron having been one of the first metals we’ve worked with, after copper and bronze), steel does have a few magical properties that have survived. Like iron, steel is most strongly associated with protection (so much so that in a few practices where metals are significant considerations, it’s acceptable to use an athame of steel in place of iron). If your tin can is actually made of steel, as many coffee cans are, consider growing plants such as rosemary or tomatoes (as starters) whose properties resonate quite strongly with iron and steel.

Not sure what your container is made of? Check to see if it’s magnetic. If it sticks, chances are that it is made of steel or has a high content of iron. If not, then it is most likely aluminum. Ultimately, however, you’re going to want to work with your gut feelings. If you don’t feel that your container brings anything to the magic, then don’t incorporate it into the spell, opting instead to just make use of the thriftiness of the idea. If you have a steel can but feel that it works best for love spells, then by all means grow that lavender in it!

May all your harvests be bountiful!
Blessed Be! )O(

Creating banishing Stones

Create banishing stones:

Many people and energies pass through your home, create and use these stones to help banish and keep away evils from passing through your doorstep.

Items needed:

Flat stones, enough to place one on each side of your doors where people enter from the outside.

White paint

Black paint (optional to paint warding symbols onto the stones)

Find your stones and wash them off of any dirt.  Now paint them white, be sure to paint it completely.

After the white paint has dried, paint one warding symbol onto each stone.

once finished painting you can walk around your house and place the stones one on each side of the entrance to the doors.

As you place the say:

“Ward away all that can harm

stones by my door protect and ward.

Banish all spirits that come through my yard.”

The Domestic Garden Witch: Not So Jarring Kitchen Herbs

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Apple Sauce, Jars, and Kitchen Herbs

Let’s face it. I work in an Italian kitchen, and much of the cooking I do at home is also influenced by Italian cuisine. As a result, I find myself constantly in need of herbs such as parsley, basil, rosemary, oregano, and thyme. While all of these plants are fairly easy to grow in various gardens, sometimes you need something inexpensive, easy, and within arm’s reach when cooking.

For this project, all you need is a few mason jars (if you don’t have any lying around, mason jars are very inexpensive and sold at most grocery stores in the canning aisle), some apple sauce snack cups (preferably consumed and cleaned), some wooden wicks (easily purchased online from companies such as the Candlewic Company), water, soil, seeds, and a box cutter or Xacto knife.

Make an incision in the center of the bottom of the apple cup long enough to fit the end of the wick. Insert the wick and fill the cup with soil and seeds. Remove the lid from the mason jar, discard the topper disc, and fill part way with water before resting the edge of the cup on the rim of the jar. Screw on the fastening ring, and voila! You have a very simple, very cheap herb garden to place in the windowsill. Since the wick passively draws water, the only time you’ll need to add water is when the jar runs out or when the water level isn’t high enough to be in contact with the wick.

Pro-tip: Be sure to trim the plants regularly - this is a garden meant to be harvested from regularly so that it doesn’t get too large. If needed, the roots can also be pruned and trimmed to help keep the plant small. If your plants begin to bud, pinch the buds off to encourage large, flavorful leaves.

How Can I Witch This?

When it comes to incorporating witchcraft into a simple garden like this, the possibilities are aplenty! Consider enchanting the water or using moon water in the jar, or if you’re into using crystals, place amethyst or clear quartz into the jars to help empower the water. Decorate the jars with sigils, runes, and symbols for growth, health, and prosperity!

The soil itself can be worked with, incorporating eggshell, ashes, or other magical substances that can help encourage the plants to grow healthy and large. You can also label the jars for their respective herbs and incorporate decorations on the label that correspond with the herbs you’re growing!

Consider different ways where you can incorporate magic into growing your herbs with this type of garden, and how it can help you with your kitchen witchery!

May your harvests always be bountiful!

Blessed Be! )O(

Lesson 3: Witchcraft 101

Terminology and Basic Theory

By: Headmistress Trick

Live class date and time: 1/3/2017 @ 4:40pm

As with all things in the pagan community, I advise you research twice then come to your own conclusions. Your craft is YOUR CRAFT, this may not be a perfect fit for you, that it okay. We are all  the tailors of our own spiritual clothes.

This course will cover basic terms and tools, the beginner’s theory and practice of simple rituals and how to construct your own spells.

Things that will NOT be covered in this course: In-depth explanations of the various areas of magic. I will provide a basic grand overview, but the purpose of this class is not to delve into any one concentration of practice. If something you hear strikes your interest, please feel free to ask me for more information. If I don’t know about what you’re asking, I’ll find someone that does.


The Basics

The only thing you need to cast any spells whatsoever, is a witch. If you’re sitting in for this course, that’s probably you. You can call yourself any title you choose, practitioner, wizard, sorcerer, magician, crazy person, spiritualist, whatever… Anyway, to perform magick, that is the manipulation of energies to bring about an intended result. This can be done with or without the assistance of deities or entities outside one’s self.

Generally all workers,  even secular ones, have some sort of altar to use as a work space. These are highly personal spaces. They can be simple, grand, portable, stationary, cluttered, clean, whatever you like. It doesn’t have to be fancy or expensive. In traditional Wicca, every tool has a place on the altar. This is by no means is something most practitioners still prescribe to. What you choose to have and use in your practice can be as minimalist or extravagant as you like. You can have all the tools or none of them. It is entirely up with you.

Statues, fetishes (these are small carvings,) or some kind of physical representation of gods or goddesses. Many consider this to be the house that you invite spirits, deities, or entities to inhabit when calling them for spells or rituals. Obviously if you’re secular this won’t be part of your practice.

Candles- Let’s be honest, an altar without a single candle, led or traditional, is a rare one indeed. They’ve a million uses in spells and have their own branch of magic aptly called candle magic.

Bowl- For keeping stuff in. When doing an elemental spell this is usually used to hold water, sand, salt, or dirt, but it can hold anything that needs containing.

Athame- This is a ritual knife. Some people use swords or daggers, some people use a grubby old pocket knife given to them by their great uncle. This is generally used for cutting or directing energy. It is not always sharp and there is a little bit of argument about whether it should be used for non-ritual purposes. Some say daily use dulls the magick inside it, others say it enhances it. I say, it is your knife, use it for what you like.

Bolline- A utility knife actually used for cutting physical objects. If you use your Athame as a functional knife you probably don’t need this.

Cauldron- If ever there was an image of a witch it was an old crone bent over a cauldron stirring away at something nasty bubbling over a fire. These can be used for bubbling toil and trouble, but also for a holding place for burning things.

Wand- Generally a thin stick thing for pointing and directing energy. This can be a myriad of objects from one’s fingers, pencils, spoons, actual sticks or specially crafted wands. Don’t let anyone tell you something can’t be a wand.

Mortar and Pestle- A small bowl with a little club for crushing, grinding and mixing herbs and spices. Be advised that wood, plastics and porous stones can pick up scents and flavours from the things you put in them. Do not use the same set for non-edible items that you do for ones you intend on eating.

Chalice- Fancy cup. Usually used for offering drinks to entities or passing around the group in a coven ritual. Traditionally this is in a goblet shape, but I’ve used a coffee cup in a pinch. Make sure whatever you use is food safe and easy to wash. Do not leave offerings sitting it until they get fuzzy.

Incense- This is sometimes used to represent air in elemental workings. It is best to avoid purely synthetic scents when possible. These will require some kind of holder. A fireproof container filled with sand can serve just as well in a pinch. If working in a group please be sure to ask about allergies and sensitivities to scents.

Grimoire- This is a witch’s go to book for all things that are important enough to write down. Just like a woman’s purse, one should never open and look through another person’s grimoire without express permission. Taking things that are not freely given from it is dangerous at best.

Broom- Used for sweeping energies, especially negative ones. Is wonderful for dissipating said energies.  Not for flying on. Sweep your floor and get the dust out along with the bad stuff.

Drums/bells- Sound can be useful for wards, driving away negative energy and calling attention. They’re also great for keeping time when dancing in a group.

Baskets, bottles, bins- For keeping stuff in. Don’t laugh.

Bucket of water/fire extinguisher- Candles can go from representations of fire to “oh shit my house is on fire” very quick. Safety first.

Stones, crystals, cords, fabric, oils, herbs, salt, flour, chalk - spell ingredients. They’ll end up everywhere unless you contain them in the baskets, bottles and bins I mentioned earlier.  DO NOT CAST CIRCLES OUTSIDE USING SALT. IT WILL KILL WILDLIFE.

Ritual Clothes- Special clothing is by no means a requirement, actually some people say this separates them too far from their craft, like putting on a costume. Others say it enhances the ritual experience for them. Whatever you are comfortable wearing should be what you practice in. Skyclad is a way of referring to being naked, by the way.

Divination tools- Tarot cards, runes, scrying mirrors, crystal balls, tea leaves. Only needed when planning on doing divination.

While none of these things are required to perform any spells, they can be helpful. No beginner should feel they have to break the bank to get a bunch of items they may or may not use. Be wary of materials of anything that will be touching your mouth or eyes. Cheap antique metals especially can sometimes contain lead. Used bookshops, thrift stores, flea markets and yard sales can be gold mines for things to use in your craft.

Many practitioners believe in cleansing and consecrating their tools before using them. They feel any strange energies coming into their space that wasn’t invited can contaminate their spells. There are as many methods of purification as there are stars in the sky, but some common methods are

Ground, cast a circle and call whatever energies into play that you wish to work with. Hold the item above your work space and “sweep” or “cut” away any unwanted energies while calling for the negative to be dispersed. Then you can set the item down onto your altar and  fill it with good energies and intents.

Smoke cleansing, passing a fireproof item briefly through candle flame, bathing in water (charged, rain or crystal water are commonly used for this practice), leaving it in direct sun or moonlight for a few hours or burying overnight in clean soil are also common ways of dealing with negative energies. Some believe a simple spiritual wipe down is all you need.

I have heard some practitioners say the repeat this process any time they use a tool in a ritual, and some simply when they feel the need recharging.

Whatever process you choose, make sure it is safe for you to use on the item and that you feel completely comfortable doing it. If you go into it with uncertainty or negative feelings, you’ll just be imbuing those into the item instead of cleaning it.

Now that you know what kind of tools you might be using, you probably are curious what kinds of magic you can perform. I by no means believe this is a completely comprehensive list. I’m only human after all.

Astral work- The art of using one’s mind to expand your presence and travel beyond one’s physical body.

Black/Dark/ Left Hand Path- This generally is anything that falls outside of the realm of white magic. This can include work that deals with death, blood, hexes, and gathering of power. Not always evil, not always good. This sometimes includes working with demons or fae, but certainly not always.

Cosmic- The use of planetary or celestial bodies in influencing one’s magical workings.

Candle- The use of color and shape correspondences in spells that use candles extensively.

Crystal/Stone/Lapidary- The use of correspondences of types of stones and gems in spells, using the natural energies found within  rock.

Herbalism/Green magic- The use of growing things to make your potions, spells and other magical workings. This generally includes gardening at some point.

Kitchen/Hearth/Cottage- This is household magic. Spells are woven into everyday cooking, cleaning and household tasks. This is a very vast area of magic that can encompass many other sections.

Knot/Cord/String- The use of string and cord for creating spells or charms. A very portable type of spellcasting.

Music/Sound- The use of singing, humming, playing musical instruments or otherwise creating sounds for spells.

Divination- Attempting to foretell the future through various means such as tarot, runes, scrying, reading tea leaves or palmistry.

Sigils, Symbols and Runes- Visual representations of concepts and intents in one’s craft. This can include esoteric alphabets and occult imagery.

Elemental- Working with one or all of the elements to bring about one’s intentions.

Weather- Working in conjunction with and influencing the weather

White/Light- Generally any magic that does not fall into the somewhat unsavory realm of “bad” magic. This does not mean this is the only right kind of magic to do.

There are literal hundreds of types and branches of magic, including specific pantheons of deities that I am not going to cover here, and ethnic or regional types of crafts. I always encourage you to seek out more information on your own.

Before we wind down I want to go over some other common terms that may or may not come up

Familiar- A companion, usually animal, that serves as a host to a spiritual entity or energy. They assist with workings and are generally good to have around. Please take good care of your familiars if you have them.

Coven- A group of witches or practitioners. You do not need one if you don’t want one, but they can be a great support group.

Spell- The working of magic itself.

Incantation- The spoken bit of the spell, absolutely does not have to rhyme, though that can help with memory recall. This can be in any language, though one you’re familiar with would probably be best.

Charm- An object that is created to hold an enchantment, usually carried or worn by the intended recipient.

Channeling- The controversial process of becoming host to another spirit of entity.

Three Fold Rule- The idea that whatever you send out will return to you three times over. This applies to both the good and the bad.

Potion- A mixture of ingredients usually meant to be swallowed by the person the magic is supposed to effect. Please never make a potion out of toxic or dangerous ingredients.

Ointment/Salve- Lotiony sort of stuff that goes on your skin.

Poultice- Soft wet mass of stuff you put on your skin. Usually contains herbs and other ingredients bound together with moss, gauze or flour and held on with a cloth wrapped around the body part

Correspondence- The relation between an item and the energy it influences. Like a type of stone being handy for working with psychic energies, or healing. Black candles being good for banishment and cleansing.  These are not always agreed upon by every magic user.

Enchant- to fill an item with energy or intention

Grounding- The release of negative energy and reaffirming one’s personal boundary of energy and influence

Sabbat- A festival, holiday or gathering for celebratory or ritual reasons

Pentagram vs Pentacle – If you are involved in craft that uses the star in the circle emblem, you should know that a pentagram is just the star, the pentacle is the whole thing within the circle. Calling it a pentagram makes you look like an ill informed goth kid. Always be a well informed goth kid.

Casting a circle- the act of creating both physical and metaphysical barriers for energies.

Shielding/ Warding- the creating of a protective barrier between your target and bad/unwanted things.

Binding- The attempt to hold someone or something and keep it from performing any harmful or unwanted actions.

Banishment/Purification- Casting out of bad energies or influences

Calling the Corners- The concept that the cardinal directions correspond to guardians or spiritual entities and calling upon them to serve as protectors for a ritual

Offerings/Sacrifices- Objects that are surrendered to an entity. Do not perform any kind of animal or blood sacrifice without fully understanding what you are doing and warning anyone else that might be involved in the process. Food, drinks, gifts and offerings of effort are generally more than enough to appease deities or spirits.

Please if you have any questions, please let me know. I will not be answering any questions about specific regional or cultural craft that I am unfamiliar with, but will try to find you resources or someone to speak to about them.

We will be reconvening for class on Sunday to do basic spellwork and go over some common correspondences. We will be doing a simple protection charm so please find an item you wish to enchant. It can be an item you use and keep on you daily or a found item. Any other things you would like to bring to share with the class of your own workings would be wonderful. Thank you and I hope you learned something new.