run to india

Holi - India

Holi is a spring festival, known as the festival of colour, or the festival of love. It is the most widely celebrated Hindu festival. Though it is mainly observed in India & Nepal, celebrations have spread to other parts of the world, and is now celebrated by non religious people who enjoy the sentiment of love and colour that the festival stands for. 

kalagang AU headcanons that needs to be written [1/?]

If any of you plan to write any of these, please link me! I would be so thrilled to read it! Also, it’d be nice if this post was credited if any of you plan to write it! 

  • Princess AU where Wolfgang is a criminal on the run so he flies to India to lay low for awhile. During his stay, he sees the princess of Mumbai, Kala Dandekar, standing at a balcony during the Diwali festival. 
  • Kalagang Werewolf AU where Wolfgang is the alpha of the sensate pack in Berlin, and Kala, a human pharmacist that works for an organization whose main goal is to exterminate his kind, is his mate. 
  • Kalagang Neighbor AU where Kala and Wolfgang’s apartment are next to each other and Kala can’t sleep because of the sex noises coming from next door. 
  • Kalagang Soulmate AU where Wolfgang and Kala both live in a world where destined soulmates exists. These destined soulmates have the same birthmarks, and Wolfgang and Kala both have the same birthmarks. 
  • Kalagang AU where Wolfgang was bleeding from gun shots and, on his attempt to get to someplace safe, meets Kala Dandekar who helped him with his wounds until they were healed. Kala and Wolfgang got closer and closer until he one day disappeared leaving only a medallion in the shape of a wolf. It turns out that Wolfgang is the head of the most dangerous crime family in Germany, and he wants Kala. 
  •  Kalagang mythology AU where Wolfgang is Hades and Kala is Persephone. 
  • Kalagang mythology AU where Wolfgang is Achilles fighting for the Greeks against the Trojans during the Trojan war, and Kala is Briseis, the Trojan priestess who serves Apollo and was captured by Achilles. 
  • Kalagang medieval AU where Princess Kala was abducted by Wolfgang and Felix, two notorious and cunning thieves that were known in the Kingdom.

INDIA, Bangalore : Women take part in India’s first ever “Stilleto Run”, organised by women’s fashion brand Elle, on International Women’s Day in Bangalore on March 8, 2015. International Women’s Day is marked on March 8 every year and is a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future. AFP PHOTO / Manjunath KIRAN

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Actor Nicholas Hoult traveled to Chitwan National Park, Nepal in December 2016 to learn first-hand about rhino conservation in the area. Following his Nepal trip, Nicholas and his friends embarked on a rickshaw run across India, where they raised more than $54,000 for WWF and Teenage Cancer Trust.

Two Chuhras were busy sweeping the roads of Lahore during the Hindu Muslim violence. While the Hindus were trying to flee away from the violence, Muslims were pouring into the city from India. One sweeper asked another if he knew why people were running here and there. The other answered that the ‘Hindus are running to India while Muslims are looking for Pakistan. But we don’t need to escape to another place and nobody is going to touch us’. And they continued sweeping the empty streets.

This joke is a popular one, often narrated by upper-caste Punjabi migrants in India and Pakistan. Its significance lies in its subtle and ironic conclusion: untouchable groups were neither in the communal scheme of things nor in the making of the modern nation-states of India and Pakistan. They were neither Hindus nor Muslims and therefore were not even fit for communally motivated killings. The joke is meant to highlight the ‘Untouchable’ status of these caste groups since their very condition of untouchability became a potent defence mechanism against mass violence. The sympathetic message, if any, is that these people did not need to escape from the extraordinary violence that threatened Hindus and Muslims, but needed to escape from the violence inherent in their everyday lives. The joke ends with the two Chuhras continuing to sweep the street long after everyone has left. The continued act of sweeping underlines the historical irony of ‘Untouchable’ communities not attempting to change their traditional roles even in such a cataclysmic situation.

The listeners are expected to laugh at the punch line because the apparent irony of the situation is lost on the sweepers. This isolation from the cataclysmic events is incomprehensible for Hindu, Sikh and Muslim migrants whose experiences of Partition were so far removed from those of the Untouchables. Such caste-based experiential differences and discursive distances have seldom found representation in the narratives of Partition migration, especially since the archetypal Partition migrant, the ‘Hindu refugee’, was produced through the act of displacement and the religious identity of the displaced. The distinctions of caste and class have rarely been dredged up once they were conveniently submerged in the common experience of mass population migration, officially called the ‘exchange of populations’, during India’s Partition.

This article contends that the common experience of displacement neither bridged nor rendered caste distinctions irrelevant. Untouchable migrants were separated physically from the upper-caste Hindus through a maze of governmental policies of resettlement between 1947 and 1965, as well as alienated discursively from the popular narratives of migration and resettlement by the upper-caste Punjabi migrants. Thus, the physical separation manifested, for example, in housing arrangements for Untouchable migrants in shanty towns far removed from upper-caste migrant neighbourhoods, meant that Untouchables did not inhabit the same social space as their upper-caste counterparts. This in turn meant that the experiences of the Untouchable migrants were rarely either acknowledged or circulated in the popular discourse of Partition migration. Thus, a telescopic vision of Partition history often reveals common patterns of migration, like routes, means of transport, destinations and resettlement strategies, across various caste groups. However, a closer view reveals diverse patterns and a complex social re-ordering based on prevalent norms of caste distinctions. As a consequence, the Untouchable refugees were ‘naturally’ settled in camps and colonies away from the ones inhabited by the upper-castes even though it was never a stated governmental policy.

—  Ravinder Kaur, “Narrative Absence: An ‘Untouchable’ account of Partition migration” in Contributions to Indian Sociology 42 (2) (2008).

“Two Chuhras were busy sweeping the roads of Lahore during the Hindu Muslim violence. While the Hindus were trying to flee away from the violence, Muslims were pouring into the city from India. One sweeper asked another if he knew why people were running here and there. The other answered that the ‘Hindus are running to India while Muslims are looking for Pakistan. But we don’t need to escape to another place and nobody is going to touch us’. And they continued sweeping the empty streets.

This joke is a popular one, often narrated by upper-caste Punjabi migrants in India and Pakistan. Its significance lies in its subtle and ironic conclusion: untouchable groups were neither in the communal scheme of things nor in the making of the modern nation-states of India and Pakistan. They were neither Hindus nor Muslims and therefore were not even fit for communally motivated killings. The joke is meant to highlight the ‘Untouchable’ status of these caste groups since their very condition of untouchability became a potent defence mechanism against mass violence. The sympathetic message, if any, is that these people did not need to escape from the extraordinary violence that threatened Hindus and Muslims, but needed to escape from the violence inherent in their everyday lives. The joke ends with the two Chuhras continuing to sweep the street long after everyone has left. The continued act of sweeping underlines the historical irony of ‘Untouchable’ communities not attempting to change their traditional roles even in such a cataclysmic situation.

The listeners are expected to laugh at the punch line because the apparent irony of the situation is lost on the sweepers. This isolation from the cataclysmic events is incomprehensible for Hindu, Sikh and Muslim migrants whose experiences of Partition were so far removed from those of the Untouchables. Such caste-based experiential differences and discursive distances have seldom found representation in the narratives of Partition migration, especially since the archetypal Partition migrant, the ‘Hindu refugee’, was produced through the act of displacement and the religious identity of the displaced. The distinctions of caste and class have rarely been dredged up once they were conveniently submerged in the common experience of mass population migration, officially called the ‘exchange of populations’, during India’s Partition.

This article contends that the common experience of displacement neither bridged nor rendered caste distinctions irrelevant. Untouchable migrants were separated physically from the upper-caste Hindus through a maze of governmental policies of resettlement between 1947 and 1965, as well as alienated discursively from the popular narratives of migration and resettlement by the upper-caste Punjabi migrants. Thus, the physical separation manifested, for example, in housing arrangements for Untouchable migrants in shanty towns far removed from upper-caste migrant neighbourhoods, meant that Untouchables did not inhabit the same social space as their upper-caste counterparts. This in turn meant that the experiences of the Untouchable migrants were rarely either acknowledged or circulated in the popular discourse of Partition migration. Thus, a telescopic vision of Partition history often reveals common patterns of migration, like routes, means of transport, destinations and resettlement strategies, across various caste groups. However, a closer view reveals diverse patterns and a complex social re-ordering based on prevalent norms of caste distinctions. As a consequence, the Untouchable refugees were ‘naturally’ settled in camps and colonies away from the ones inhabited by the upper-castes even though it was never a stated governmental policy.”

- Ravinder Kaur, “Narrative Absence: An ‘Untouchable’ account of Partition migration” in Contributions to Indian Sociology 42 (2) (2008).