rules of fasting

anonymous asked:

Another anon asked before about how to write believable battles and you told him/her to ask about it again on Friday. Since he/she may've forgotten it, I'm asking you now because I'd like to read the answer!

Thanks to this question and some prodding from @hiddenhistoryofwesteros, I’ve been crafting this. Much thanks also to @goodqueenaly for fixing my atrocious grammar.

Battle can be an important conflict piece for any piece of media, but too often, battle is either turned into a series of duels or is used merely as a setpiece for character drama. The battle itself can be a moment of action and tension, and as such, a poorly-written battle detracts from the experience of the novel, and that I don’t like. I after all, have a vested interest in explaining how battles were waged and the vicarious experience of the soldiers that were in them. So that being said, let’s see what we can do to understand how battles work and how you can incorporate them into your writing.

Keep reading

🚨 The internet needs you 🚨

You’re up again, Tumblr. 

Back in 2015 you demanded that the FCC adopt strict net neutrality rules and establish a free and open internet. And you won

That should’ve been the end of it. But apparently not.

The new head of the FCC wants to undo the net neutrality protections you fought so hard for.

His proposed changes open the door to your web traffic being slowed down, or even blocked altogether. You could be forced to pay extra to use your favorite apps. You could even be prevented from getting news from the sources you trust.

Title II protects consumers and democracy by ensuring all voices can be heard.

You know the drill. Here’s what to do:

The FCC is taking comments from the public, and dearfcc.org is making it as simple as possible for you to make your voice heard.

Go there now 👉 dearfcc.org ✌️

You’ll just need to provide a name, an address, and then say a little bit about why rolling back Title II protections is a bad idea. If you’re not quite sure what to write, here’s something to get you started:

I’m writing to urge you to keep our Open Internet rules based on Title II in place. Without them, we could lose the internet as we know it.

The proposed changes to FCC rules would allow fast lanes for sites that pay, and force everyone else into slow lanes. We’ve already seen access to streaming services like Netflix, popular games like League of Legends, and communication platforms like FaceTime slowed down, or even blocked. Conditions like this hurt businesses large and small, and penalize the users who patronize them. 

The changes also open the door to unfair taxes on internet users, and could also make it harder for blogs, nonprofits, artists, and others who can’t pay up to have their voices heard.

Please leave the existing net neutrality rules based on Title II in place.

Thank you!

If you need more ammo, feel free to quote these experts from our net neutrality Issue Time. TechCrunch and Battle for the Net also have some good starters.

Everyone is counting on everyone else here. Do your part and tell the FCC to keep a free and open internet under Title II. 

Take life at a pace that feels right to you. No one said that you need to rush to get to the very end destination. There are no rules to see how fast one can live their life. Life is just simply meant to be lived. So take it slow, or take is a bit faster. Either way, make sure that it feels comfortable to you.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin

٩( ๑^ ꇴ^)۶- #FinalFanartFriday

_______________________

This started the 11/07/16 and we’ll loop the loop the 11/07/17 !

See you the 11 july for moar informations //winky wonk// i’ll reveal the theme, deadline and rules !

that ended too fast, nostalgia is kicking my poor kokoro. It’s time for us to thanks the crew a last time ! If you want to join, Be prepared !٩(๑˃́ꇴ˂̀๑)۶

vindieselWant to take a moment to acknowledge those who have been our back bone for seventeen years. Those who helped build our foundation. Those who petitioned with me to bring Letty back… the Dotty fans… so proud of all involved. But most proud of you, the fans for maintaining your continual faith.

All love…

Q&A, LOS spoilers, Ty

ti-bae-rius said:Hey! First, thank you for Ty, because he’s the first character I’ve ever had like me. But I wondered whether people like him would be in the dregs program of the Academy? He seems to be able to hold his own in a battle, but the Clave aren’t exactly the most understanding. What’s the policy on the dregs program? Who goes in and who gets to stay in the Shadowhunters stream?


In Ty’s case, he’s never gone to the Academy, so we don’t know for sure where they’d want to put him. Julian worries Ty would end up in with the dregs, but then Julian’s a worrier, and he’s very protective of his family. For all we know, the higher-ups at the academy might see Ty as a great candidate for the Shadowhunter track. But even if they did, Ty might find himself in conflict with the authoritarian rules of the academy, and his teachers might not be understanding of the ways his mind works (such as the usefulness of pipe-cleaner toys to fiddle with, etc). So it’s hard to guess how it would all shake out.

There isn’t a hard and fast rule about where Shadowhunters who are similar to Ty (in the sense of being neuroatypical) would end up. That’s because the Clave doesn’t really believe in or acknowledge autism or anything like it (Julian mentions as things the Clave doesn’t acknowledge, without naming them because he doesn’t have the words, ADHD and dyslexia). Students would be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Some of them might end up on the “dregs” track. Others might end up on the Shadowhunter track. It would vary from person to person, based on the specifics of their situation. 

asillymango said:I have a weird hunch that the faerie boy Dru saw in the cavern, when she touched the magical faerie thing in Jaime’s bag, will play an important role in TQoAaD. Is he possibly a descendant of the Lost First Heir, or the heir himself? I also remember the crest of the Unseelie King being present in that scene if that could be a possible hint. Another question: could he be what tied the Rosales family to the world of the Fae? If these are spoilers I understand if you choose not to answer them :)

Ash is important to the ongoing story. I can’t tell you much about him, but he appears in QoAD in some unexpected places, making some unexpected alliances. He isn’t related to what ties the Rosaleses to Faerie, though.

wreckofourhearts said:Hi! I finished LoS last week & it left me with one huge question: will Clary’s vision be explained? I can’t see you just bringing up Clary having visions of her dying & leave that idea unsolved, but I’m dying to know if you can tell us anything about how much Clary and Jace will be in QoAD or if you’ll go into detail a little about her visions. I would love to know anything you can spill about this idea in general because I don’t know if I could stand Clary dying outside of her main book series!

There’s not too much I can tell you aside from the fact that the visions will be addressed again and you’ll find out what happens to Clary in QuAD. It’s true TMI is over, but there are climactic huge battles to come in the Shadowhunter world, so the TMI characters will never truly be totally out of potential danger until all the books are over …

ronaanpynch said:Hi Cassie! :) I finished LoS two days ago and I LOVED IT! Also I was surprised that you mentioned the Rome Institute! Now I have a question: the Herondale we see in the memory held in the aletheia crystal was Tobias and William Herondale’s father? 

That Herondale was indeed Tobias and William’s father. The scene from the aletheia crystal illustrates how he was not a particularly compassionate person, even when his children were small. (William and Tobias would have been about four and two years old at the time.)

animalcr0ssings said:Hello! At this point do you know how many deaths there are going to be in QoAaD? 

Yes,  but this time around I’m not going to name a number. :)

tips for writing void and water navies

So, since I actually work around boats all day and also have a thing for blathering about the voidfaring life, here’s a few things I wanted to share that maybe other people might find helpful for adding some realism and believability to their own fictions involving the same things. 

Naming Conventions: 
Ships are often referred to incorrectly in fiction. A ship’s name does not have “the” in front of it, unless that is actually part of the name of the vessel. Example sentence: 

Correct: Vengeful Spirit was an exceptional vessel, the only Scylla variant-build ever constructed of the ancient and intimidating Gloriana pattern. 

Incorrect: The Vengeful Spirit awaited them, a hulking monstrosity cruising slowly just above atmos as she waited in low orbit.

Now, this is not a hard and fast rule. There is a time that you can call a ship “the -name-,” and that is if the ship has been destroyed/sunk/decommissioned, is a piece of history thought to be destroyed, etc. Examples of this: The Black Pearl, the Edmund Fitzgerald. Just be aware that, generally, if your ship in question is still in service and has not become a legend yet, she probably doesn’t have “the” in front of her name. However, you /can/ name a vessel The Fickle Female, or something like that,in which case “the” is part of the name and is fine. Also, pirate ships and privately-run vessels may have “the” in front of their names, though this can make them sound a bit hokey and corny. Another semi-exception is when using the vessel’s full name/title, example “the U.S.S. Enterprise” or “the H.M.S. Titanic” (although Titanic could also call under the “historical indicator from “the.” Passengers who are not familiar with shipfaring may also think of the vessel as “the Glorious Name,” but your crew, and most likely your omniscient narrator, would not. 

Long story short? If your vessel left for her maiden voyage ten or a hundred years ago and hasn’t yet left service… no need for “the”– especially if it’s a crewman doing the talking.

Terminology:
Ships have their own words for everything. Here’s a quick rundown: 

Berth/Berthing: places where crew or possibly passengers sleep.
Quarters: Same as above, but generally insinuating more luxurious accommodations.
Bow: The front/nose of the ship, as a noun
Stern: The rear/ass end of the ship, as a noun.
Prow: The very front of the bow, the “nose” of a ship.
Transom: The flat “ass” of a ship. 
Engines: Whatever makes your ship go. Boats may have motors, but ships have engines. 
Bulkhead: An interior wall of a ship. 
Gunwale: Pronounced “gunnel.” The outside “wall” of the ship as created by the hull.
Hatch: A door or doorway. You can close a hatch or walk through a hatch.
Hatchway: Doorway. You cannot “close” a hatchway, but only walk through it. 
Porthole: a window
Ahead: To engage the engines in a way that the ship moves forward, as in “full steam ahead.”
Astern: To engage the engines in such a way that the ship moves backward/in reverse.
Deck: Any “floor” in or on the ship. Stuff you walk on.
Topside/abovedecks: the “outside area” of a boat. Where you can stand and feel the air on your face.
Belowdecks: “inside” the ship’s hull. “below” is a shortening of this. 
Bilge: A pump that removes water (or whatever) from inside the vessel.
Scuttle: to trash something or throw it out.
Scuttlebutt: Rumors and gossip, trashtalking.
Galley: The kitchen.
Head: bathrooms
Bridge: The part of the ship where it is controlled.
Helm: Phrase for describing the person actually controlling the ship’s movements. The person “at the helm” is the person making the decisions, not the person with the wheel in their hands. If your captain tells his first mate, “Six degrees to starboard, steady on”, the captain is at the helm. If the first mate is making that decision himself because the captain can’t, he’s “at the helm.” 
Moorings: attachment to a dock. “moored” meaning attached in this way.
Flotsam: Stuff floating in the water, or in space.
Masts: Big posts that sails fly from.
Boom: Big post going across the mast that sails attach to.
Make fast: tie shit down
Eye: a round thing to tie to or pass a rope through. 
Cleat: a thing for tying shit to.
Lines: Ropes.
Hold: Any large space inside of a ship to put shit, or “stow” it.

There’s lots more, and lots if you want to get into sailing vessels involving the names for the different sails and masts and such, but this is enough to get you started.

Directions and time: 

Ships have their own way of designating the “directions” on  the ship. Aft and stern are not synonyms: aft is a direction, the stern is the actual physical part of the ship. Same with forward and bow. 

Forward: The “front” direction, anything from the middle of the ship to the very tip of the prow.

Aft: The ass end direction. Anything from the middle to the very farthest back part of the ship.

Port: If you are standing on the ship and looking forward, this is going to be on your left. It’s easy to remember because “left” and “port” both have four letters.

Starboard: Pronounced “starberd.” The “right” side of the ship, if you are standing on the ship, looking forward. Two R’s in starboard– “right.”

This is helpful in writing because you can use these words to describe how your characters move about their surroundings, IE, “She looked up, lost, heading what she assumed was aftward.”

Ships generally have their own clock and specific time. Even today in real life, submarines will have their own times and clocks, often with each crewmember on his own clock.

Summary: Idk people, talk about the cool shit in your spaceships more! Hope this helped.      

Pavlov had it all wrong

I am a single adult human living in a house with two corgis. Got Girldog from a shelter when she was about a year, year and a half old maybe; got Boydog a few years later as an 8-week puppeh. And let me tell you something, from Day One, this has been a three-way psychological experiment. I no longer know who is manipulating who on a daily basis.

  • One of the first things I trained Girldog to do was not to bark at the dinner table; if she barked at me while I was eating, I put her in The Quiet Place (her crate) where she couldn’t see me. She learned almost immediately to subvocalize her barks, to let out a breath with just enough vocal cord vibration that I wouldn’t QUIIIITE consider it a bark and move her further away from the food. It’s a sound like this: “Hrrrr. Hrrrr. Hhhrahhh.” I didn’t realize how odd this was until my aunt came over and said, “That dog hissed at me.” “Yes,” I said, “she does that.”
  • Boydog learned to do tricks by watching Girldog. I never taught him to sit. He learned by watching Girldog get a treat for sitting. Once, I told both dogs to sit at the same time, while I held a treat in each hand. When Girldog didn’t sit quick enough, Boydog put his paw on her butt and pushed her down.
  • I hung a bell on the door and taught Boydog to ring it when he wants to go out. Girldog sees no reason she should ring the bell, as it is beneath her dignity, and she can get her way by barking instead. Boydog, however, will ring the bell for Girldog when she lurks around by the door, although he has no interest in going outside himself. Girldog has made Boydog her personal slave in this matter.
  • Boydog rings the bell when he doesn’t need to go out but thinks I have been at my computer too long. By the time I get to the kitchen, he’s nowhere near the door, but hey mom, as long as you’re up, let’s play! He obviously does not believe I can see through this extremely clever ploy.
  • Girldog once climbed onto a sofa, crossed the back of it, leapt from the sofa to my desk chair, leapt from the chair to the desk, and knocked all my stuff off the desk. (I wasn’t there, but it was obvious from the trail of destruction what route she had taken.) Then she got down and proceeded to ignore the bag of corn chips she’d encountered and focus her attention on biting my phone charger in half, chewing up a USB memory stick, and eating a pen. I still have no idea how she could be so smart and so dumb at the same time.
  • Boydog will chase a laser pointer (not uncommon for dogs introduced to them as puppies! Pro tip) but only when Girldog is not around, because she hates it for some reason and will tackle him for it. Girldog also likes to be outside while I want to be in, and Boydog prefers to have us both inside. Boydog will lead me to the laser pointer, pester me until I get it down, and then run around chasing the laser and barking madly. No matter how stubborn Girldog has been about staying outside, she wants to know what he’s barking at and immediately comes inside. (It is always the laser pointer he’s barking at, Girldog. Always.)
  • There is a chair in my bedroom that I cannot sit on. The dogs take turns sleeping on it, depending on who gets there first. The only hard and fast rule is that if the human sits on the chair, they will both lose their cool. The chair is for dogs only. I have not even tried to sit on the chair for about six months now.

I suspect I’ll be adding more of these as the three of us continue to train each other.

2

Hi, guys! I recently received an ask from @sunny-bunnies about my handwriting and headers! I thought my headers were more interesting (I’ll probably do a handwriting tag eventually haha), and I have a lot that I use so this post would get way long if I did both :)

Anyway, I’m going to go through all of the headers that I use regularly! they’re pictured above with and without shadows as a tl;dr.

monoline: this style is pretty popular right now and is also my current favorite! basically, it’s cursive, but uneven- whenever a letter ends in a downstroke, I extend it a little below where it would usually be and also vary the line on which the letters “sit.” The most important tip for this style is to keep stroke width and letter size the same, so that the unevenness looks intentional and not sloppy.

lowercase: I like to use this one as a subheading! it looks much better in the shadow version but basically you write in lowercase print as neatly as you can and hope for the best.

uppercase: This one can be used virtually anywhere! It’s pretty much writing in all caps; I prefer to stretch it vertically! (If you do this, make sure your letters are vertically centered in the same place! ex. the middle line on the E can go high, low, or in the middle, but it should also match where the bump of a P ends.)

faux calligraphy: (forgive me running out of space on this one oops) sort of like monoline (you can do the cursive evenly, like above, or unevenly), but after you write, go back in and thicken the downstrokes. This is much easier than regular calligraphy if you a. don’t feel confident with your calligraphy or b. don’t own brush pens!

serif 1: this one’s cute and kinda typewriter-ish! just print your letters and add serifs (little mini dashes) to the ends of lines. boom! you’re done. I like to look up a typewriter font to have a reference for the serif length and placement, but tbh it looks pretty good even if you wing it.

serif 2: serif 1 but adding to vertical strokes (note that these are not the same as the downstrokes used in faux calligraphy!) I based this style off of times new roman if you need a reference. A warning about serifs: shadows are a pain to do so if you choose to do a shadow + serif, make sure your header is 10 or fewer letters (you’ll thank me later.)

two-tone: take your faux calligraphy (this works better if you have thicker strokes), draw an imaginary line down the middle, and use a darker color to color over the top or bottom (I favor the bottom but it’s a matter of personal preference!) Layering colors (as opposed to just making each half the letter one color) has 2 benefits: 1. no guesswork in trying to match up halves, and 2. the colors look more cohesive! You can also try to blend the colors together to make a gradient (lay down more of the darker color and blend it upward with the lighter one!)

big & small: uppercase, but instead of adding shadows, add mini cursive letters to the centers of the colored letters. Make sure to connect it all together!

highlighted caps: A classic and perfect if you’re in a rush or doing subheaders. just write in all caps and highlight over it. voilá!

color shadow: I would definitely recommend doing this in a larger space than the one I left myself (check out this post to see it done less sloppily) but the idea is to do faux calligraphy with the black pen and the shadow with your colored pen or highlighter! (here I would generally recommend a gel pen or felt, fine-tipped marker but obviously I didn’t follow either of my own tips so make of that what you will)

a note on shadows: So I’ve mentioned shadows a couple times. Unless you want to make your life hard, do the shadows after the main body of the letter. There are just 3 basic rules I follow here! 1. pick 2 adjacent directions to do the shadows in (above, I picked down and right but you can also pick down and left or, if you’re feeling creative, up and left or right.) 2. For every line, one side should be in shadow. this isn’t a hard-and-fast rule but it’s pretty good to follow in general. 3. Choose a primary and secondary direction! For example, I picked down and right, correct? But if I have a capital A (see “uppercase”) I need to pick between a down/left shadow and an up/right shadow. Since I picked right as my primary direction, I choose the up/right side! This is basically an extension of rule 2 but it took me a while to figure out so I thought it should be included.

Sorry! this post went a lot longer than I had intended, but hopefully it was informative! P.S. if you like my posts, maybe you’d also like my new studygram!

Legit Writing Tips #1: Quick Editing

To put it quite simply, editing is boring. And slow. And mind numbing. And frustrating. And long. Here’s a checklist to make it a little bit easier.

Write It. Then Don’t Touch It: Finish the scene, story, novel, paragraph, vignette, prompt, or chapter, then stop. Take a step away from your computer (or notebook. Hardcore) and leave it alone. There’s no hard and fast rule for how long, but the idea is to literally forget as much of what you just wrote as possible. The more you read the same thing over and over, the more your brain skips over what you think you already know, and that means you will forget things. Lots of things. So leave it alone.

Spell-check: This should be the most obvious thing in the world, but if you haven’t, run the whole thing through a spellchecker. You may have turned it off so you don’t see red lines under things you know are spelled correctly. Yes, thank you spell-check, I understand that my made up fantasy names seem to trigger something in you, but tone down the enthusiasm.

Run it through again anyway. See red, squiggly line? Fix it. Run it through a grammar checker. Still see lines? Fix it. Then get Microsoft Word or something with a built in spell-check. Seriously.

Focus on one thing at a time: Focus on dialogue on the first run through, then do description next, punctuation after that, etc. Pick one thing to focus on for each pass so you don’t get distracted or confused. Create your own checklist of things to keep an eye out for and do a run through every once and a while.

Check for repetitiveness: Make sure your sentences and paragraphs don’t start with the same word/letter. If you can say the same thing in less words, do it. If the character says something twice in a row, cut it out. If two sentences in a row starts with the same letter, adjust it. Same with paragraphs. Vary sentence and paragraph length, as well. Occasionally, you’ll have dialogue or description that naturally falls this way, this is fine, just don’t make a habit of it, and be aware of it.

Watch your dialogue tags: How many times has your character ‘laughed’ or 'sighed’ or 'smiled’ in this chapter? This leans into the repetitiveness we talked about above. Use new words. Get them to do new things. Don’t just add for the sake of adding, but adjust accordingly.

Change how you read it: As stated above, the more you read your story, the less you see of it. Change the font size, or the font itself. Print the story out on paper (not really applicable for novels). Change the color of the font in your favorite word processor and mark problems in red, good passages in blue, things that need to stay in green, etc. 

Keep notes as you write: This doesn’t help unless you’ve done it before you’ve started editing, but it’s helpful during edits. Keep track of everything. Add them everywhere. “Sarah has green eyes.” “John doesn’t like peas”. “Need to figure out a name for a town” “Need name for background character #7”, etc. That way you can write without needing to stop at every little question, and you can go back to make sure you stay consistent and Sarah doesn’t change eye color mid story.

Make your description match your scenes: Action scenes don’t need big words and flowing prose. Make it quick, concise, and urgent. Romance scenes and historical novels can take more description. Add all five senses. Describe more. Describe less. Make it work for what you’re writing. Give them different voices for dialogue. Make then all sound different and have distinctive tones.

Quick Checklist:

  • Put the story away and wait.
  • Fix all major spelling and punctuation problems.
  • Clean up the format (not majorly, just paragraph and sentence length and dialogue).
  • Go over notes. Adjust accordingly. Make more notes.
  • Make sure you have a good opening line.
  • Make us love (or hate) the characters accordingly.
  • Start close enough to the good stuff so it’s interesting, but not confusing.
  • Make your description match your scenes.
  • Make your dialogue match your characters.
  • Create conflict. Once you think you have enough, create more.
  • Cut out any and all dead spaces in your novel. Be brutal. Characters, dialogue, whole chapters. If it doesn’t fit, or make the story go forward in terms of plot, cut it. Don’t delete it though, create a document and save all your bits and pieces.. They could go in something else or spark some more ideas.
  • Make sure there’s enough to keep the reader engaged.
  • Fix all plot holes and add in back story.
  • Add in foreshadowing.
  • Make sure the story arc makes sense and ends with a satisfying climax. 

    Now that you’ve done all that, you’re ready for peer feedback! Find a good writing workshop, either in person or online, and post your newly edited story. You’ll get even more help and feedback and it will help polish up any and every part of your story. Plus you’ll get insight and ideas you’ve never even thought of.
youtube

Talk discussing how long it takes to get pretty good at something. I don’t know if it’s because I read the source material that first discussed the 10,000 hour rule, but I wasn’t aware that people were under the impression that it took 10,000 hours to just learn something. How fucking discouraging must that be for people to hear that. No, 10,000 hour rule is 1) discussing the average amount of time it took experts in their fields to get to a level of expertise, 2) isn’t a hard and fast rule, 3) should only be looked at as encouragement to study deliberately and understand that things take time. 

This guy posits that 20 hours of deliberate practice is about how long it takes to learn something and be decent at it. (~45 minutes a day for a month, even skipping some days here and there). Again, numbers are just numbers and don’t apply to everyone, but still cool to hear. 

Just sharing because I think it’s pretty neat seeing these things broken down, especially when he’s discussing strategies to make learning easier. It might not work for everyone, but since I’m always trying to learn stuff, trying out plans of attack is interesting to me. 

Check it out! 

like i could write 3 essays on the way “poc representation” is approached by white creators/white audiences in popular media. and there are other people of color who have said it better than me anyway (this is a good post to start with)

but when it comes to the way whites specifically on this website portray poc yall got a lot of work to do. there’s the little inaccuracies (hijabis don’t wear short sleeves, that’s not how natural hair works, etc) and then there’s yall pushing poc features to the point that you’re literally drawing racial caricatures. like i cant count the number of times i’ve seen slit-eyed east asians or Big Ethnic noses and eyebrows exaggerated to the point that it looks like ben garrison drew it, all in the name of “poc representation”. whether it’s the little things or the big things, it comes across as yall trying to score brownie points/trying to prove to other whites that you’re a Good White for being ‘diverse’ in your art - even though you obviously didn’t do even a little research and no poc appreciates being portrayed like this lol

this, of course, isn’t to say stop drawing people of color, or stop with the Poc Headcanons. its just to say to be constantly aware of what you’re doing. there’s no hard and fast rule for handling poc representation gracefully when you’re white (shit’s nuanced!), but you can at least come from a place of realness - forget the liberal mantra of “more representation!” and just draw poc as you know us to be. or do some proper googling. next time before you draw that hulking brown woman covered in exaggerated facial and body hair, consider what it means to actual brown women with facial and body hair. and so on

Disabled presenters tend to face really intense ableism. One way this plays out is that audiences laugh at us when we talk about serious things.

This happens particularly frequently when:

  • Nondisabled professionals or our parents are also on the panel, or presenting right before or after us.
  • The audience is primarily parents of disabled children/adults.
  • The audience is primarily professionals who work with people with intellectual disabilities.
  • We talk about a desire to be taken seriously.
  • We discuss our objections to being treated like children.
  • We describe being proud of a personal accomplishment.
  • We describe being treated inappropriately by a professional.
  • We describe how we felt as disabled children.

When audiences do this, it’s not nice laughter. It’s a way of asserting power. That laughter means “I don’t have to take you seriously”.

As a disabled presenter, it’s often possible to insist on respect. It’s easier said than done. It gets easier with practice, but the practice often hurts. Here are some things I’ve found helpful:

It can help to remind yourself that you know what you’re talking about, and the things you’re saying are important:

  • You’re presenting because you know what you’re talking about.
  • People should take your expertise seriously. When you talk about the things you know, they shouldn’t laugh at you.
  • Your accomplishments are not a joke. People should not laugh or be condescending about them.
  • People who treat you like a baby are doing something wrong. Your desire to be treated in an age-appropriate way is not a joke. People shouldn’t laugh at you for talking about it.

When an audience laughs at you, it can help to make it uncomfortable for them:

  • Don’t smile, and don’t laugh yourself.
  • Wait for the audience to stop laughing. 
  • Wait a second before going on to make it feel awkward. 
  • One option: Ask the audience “Why is that funny?” then continue.
  • Another option: Repeat what you said before people started laughing.

Try to avoid nervous laughter and nervous smiles:

  • It’s taboo for disabled people to talk about disability.
  • Talking about taboo topics can be embarrassing.
  • When we’re talking about embarrassing things, it can be natural to smile or laugh nervously.
  • If you seem embarrassed, the audience is more likely to feel like the topic is embarrassing and laugh to get rid of the embarrassment.
  • If you laugh, the audience is more likely to feel like it’s ok for them to laugh.

Making jokes on purpose:

  • Making jokes can be a way to control what people are laughing about.
  • This can be easier than getting them to not laugh in the first place. 
  • In these contexts, it can be better to avoid self-deprecating humor. 
  • It’s usually better to make jokes about ableism.
  • (This isn’t a hard-and-fast rule though, do what works for you.)

For instance, say you’re giving a talk about educational discrimination:

  • This is self-deprecating: 
  • “I was this ridiculous little kid in third grade. I was so enthusiastic, but I couldn’t even read. I’d hold up the books and pretend. My imaginary friend may have stolen the cookies, but she sure didn’t read for me.”
  • This is making fun of ableism:
  • “My teachers kept assigning me worksheets that I couldn’t do. They kept making me read in front of the class, even though I could never do it. They kept telling me to just do it. And they say we’re the ones who lack empathy and theory of mind.”

Don’t beat yourself up when things go wrong:

  • Presenters/panelists with disabilities face intense ableism.
  • It’s going to hurt sometimes.
  • The problem isn’t that your skin is too thin; the problem is that people are hurting you.
  • A thick skin is still worth developing.
  • If an audience laughs at you, it’s their fault, not yours. They shouldn’t act like that.
  • It’s messed up that we have to develop skills at deflecting ableism and insisting on respect. 
  • It’s also worth knowing that these skills exist and can be learned.
  • It gets much easier with practice, but no one succeeds all the time.
  • When a talk goes bad, don’t beat yourself up, and don’t blame yourself for the audience’s ableism.
  • You’re ok, they’re ableist, and the things you have to say are still valuable when they’re not valued.

These are some of the methods I’ve used to deal with audience ableism. There are others. What are yours?

Tl;dr Disabled presenters face a lot of intense ableism. In particular, audiences often laugh at us. Scroll up for some methods for insisting on respect.

Simple Traveler Challenge:

You must go from Lurelin Village to the Flight Range.

Rules:
No fast travel.
No horse.
No weapons of any kind.
No shield.
Champion abilities are allowed.
Armor rating cannot exceed 10.
No monster masks.
Travel by roads only.
No runes except for the Camera.
You cannot fight back, only run.
You can only save at inns and stables.
You can eat food.

Pro rules:
Pro hud.
No using the map.
No food, only inns.
No saving.
No champion abilities.

Lollipop Curse

This curse causes the target to have troubles in their love life. Like all curses, this one can easily backfire, so be careful. I’m of the opinion that curses should be used as a last resort, but this is hardly a hard and fast rule so you do you

Listen to Mika’s “Lollipop” and sit in your seething anger

Ingredients:

·         Lollipop (or other hard candy)

·         Cayenne pepper

·         Pepper

·         Salt

·         Picture or drawing of the target

·         Hammer

Procedure:

 

1.      Tape the picture/drawing of the target to the lollipop

2.      Channel all of your rage and disappointment and ill will into the candy

3.      Use your hammer and smash the lollipop, picturing all of your target’s closet relationships falling apart

4.      Sprinkle the cayenne pepper, the regular pepper, and the salt over the pieces of the candy

5.      Say: Everything sweet in [target’s name]’s life has become bitter

6.      Hold your hands over the picture and the mess. Say: Hey [target’s name]!

7.      Chant: Now love’s gonna get you down

8.      As you chant, continue to imagine your target’s crumbling relationships. Everything sweet has turned bitter for them

9.      Say: As I will, so mote it be (or some equivalent phrase)

10.  Rip up the picture/drawing

11.  Throw out the ripped picture and all the other bits

12.   Ground and cleanse

16 Things I learnt in 2016

1- You can lie to yourself as often as you please but always remember, we can often tell when we are being lied to. Covering up the truth with perfectly fabricated lies does not make it any less true.
2- You can not control how people react to a situation. You can do your very best to try to lessen the blow or to keep the explosion contained but this will rarely help. Let them react how they must, it is their way of coming to terms with what is happening.
3- Nothing will ever be the same as your first love, but usually this is a good thing. We often let ourselves to set no boundaries when we experience a new thing, we have no recollection of what is wrong and what we should put our foot down to. Your second love, or your third, or your fourth should not be the same as your previous one, it should be better.
4- You must make sure that you have the self-respect to realize when something is deprecating. Just because it’s something you have always had does not mean you must always have it.
5- The world only sucks if you let it seem that way. Have the maturity to take off those glasses that only see negativity and notice that maybe the universe doesn’t actually hate you, it just seems that way because you refuse to get yourself out of certain ruts and never do anything to better yourself.
6- Things do not have to be so over complicated. If you want something go for it. No one can look after you as well as you are able to look after yourself.
7- Jealousy is a dangerous emotion. Try not to let it consume you.
8-  If you aren’t careful, over time other people’s problems, illnesses and fears can become your own. Sadness is an evil emotion that will suck you in if you are not cautious. Make sure you are able to step back and identify if what is making you unhappy is actually your problem or if you are letting someone else’s issues become your own.
9- New beginnings are beautiful, and exhilarating. Try to remember this when something ends. An ending is actually an invitation for something greater to come your way.
10-  You can always tell when someone is putting effort in. They either want to talk to you or they don’t, they either have time for you or they don’t. Don’t be fooled by fake “I’m sorry’s” and “I’m just busy,”. People either put in the effort you deserve or they run the risk of losing you. It is just that simple.
11- Mental illness is in no way an excuse to treat people like shit. Your life might suck but that doesn’t mean everyone around you deserves to be your punching bag. They have their own things, learn to deal with yours in other ways than being terrible to others.
12- You have to take things as they come. Don’t try to figure everything out beforehand because you will soon realize that you will spend far too long re-configuring it all later.
13- You are not controlling for trying to look out for people or for wanting certain things from them. But you must be willing to compromise somewhere in the middle.
14- Don’t question happiness. Who cares if it’s fleeting. Nearly nothing lasts forever but that is okay because that allows us to discover so much more.
15- You do not have to forgive someone right away, but there is a fine line of holding onto something until you are ready to come to terms with it and torturing yourself with irrelevant pieces of the past.
16- Love has no limits. There are no hard fast rules of who you can fall in love with or how quickly you are allowed to love someone. Not a single person on this planet has the right or authority to create rules about intangible things. Love is love, plain and simple.

—  and here’s to the experiences that have taught me these things /// s-eren-dipi

anonymous asked:

What're your reasons for choosing the name Seraphina over Emily Jane? I'm team Seraphina all the way, I'm just curious as to your reasons 😊

Actually, you know, it’s two reasons:

1. Emily Jane wasn’t canon early on and didn’t exist when the Rise of the Guardians and Guardians of Childhood fandoms first came about. In fact, Emily Jane didn’t exist when these fandoms were at their most popular. Which meant that other names needed to be found. People made up quite a few names, but it circulated heavily in the fandom that Joyce may have been leaning towards ‘Seraphina’ as a name for Kozmotis’ daughter - he was asked about this, since fandom really wanted to know the name. Since his name was Kozmotis in the first place, and they lived on Lune, and it was a celestial golden age, ‘Seraphina’ - which has its roots clearly in Seraph - a celestial being made sense, no? When Seraphina was circulated, no one really questioned it.

So it got picked up as being a commonly used name in the fandom. And by commonly, I mean hundreds of fics on AO3 and Tumblr where no one used anything else. Since I was active during the fandom’s most active years, I did what everyone else did, and it felt natural.

2. When Emily Jane came out later, I can understand the sentimental reasons for Joyce choosing this for the Guardians of Childhood, but I personally feel it doesn’t fit my headcanon for anything to do with Kozmotis Pitchiner and his lineage. It was also an extremely delayed reveal. By then, many of us as authors had written hundreds of thousands of words about a girl named Seraphina, fanartists had put in hundreds to thousands of hours of time for a girl named Seraphina.

And finally, this:

TG fandom needs to stop kidding itself. We all know what’s in that box Nishio gave Touka, dont we??? 

Our boy Kaneki is about to be a DAD and we’ve all collectively become grandparents.

congratulations to us.