rule-76

Rule #76: No excuses, spay like a champion.

(heads up to my 10ish awesome and loyal followers: I’m going to try my hand at blogging The Vet School Experience ™, so! warnings for descriptions of disease processes, animal bodily functions, medical jargon, +/- pictures of medical things will apply. I try not to be too graphic in my descriptions, but I also know that my idea of “cool!” and other peoples’ idea of “gross!” have a fair amount of overlap, so feel free to block the tag “vet school life” if cool/gross things are not for you. and by all means, if I forget to tag a thing, just let me know!  I’ll also try to keep everything under a Read More so no one gets blindsided)

ok? ok. here we go!

Preparing for our first surgeries (cat spays!) next week, and the head tech/HBIC Pati came in to give the whole class a pep talk about what to expect, basic rules, etc.

Keep reading

Talking with mad-maddie about Overwatch and stuff. I’m actually interested and excited about it. The story and world building is neat to me, and as we pointed out, it really feels like Metzen’s getting to have fun again. By that I mean, not constricted by rules of WoW. 

Soldier 76 was an old drawing and story concept he had years and years ago and it’s cool to see it.

Disgruntled fans appeal $76,000 ruling for Super Bowl seat mix-up

By Marice Richter
DALLAS (Reuters) - (This 25 August 2015 story was refiled to correct the spelling of Pittsburgh to Pittsburg in the last paragraph)

A group of disgruntled fans who sued the National Football League over a seating fiasco at the 2011 Super Bowl has appealed a $76,000 jury award in the hope of potentially receiving more money, the fans’ attorney said on Tuesday.
A federal jury in March ruled in favor of seven fans who claimed that the NFL breached its ticket contract with them by not having all temporary seats ready in time for the Super Bowl XLV game at the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium on Feb. 6, 2011.
The jury sided with the fans on most points and awarded individual amounts ranging from about $5,700 to $22,000.
In the appeal filed last week, fans argued that claims of fraud against the NFL and allegations of deceptive trade practices should not have been dismissed by the district court.
The fans also claimed that the Dallas Cowboys should not have been dismissed as a party to the lawsuit because of their contract with the NFL to deliver the seats and sell some tickets.
“If we are successful in the appeal, we will then be permitted to pursue additional fraud and punitive damages,” the fans’ attorney, Michael Avenatti, said.
At the time of the verdict, NFL attorney Thad Behrens said his clients were pleased there was no finding of fraud.
“We will be filing a response to the plaintiffs’ appeal in due course,” Behrens said on Tuesday.
NFL officials and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones expressed remorse in testimony during the two-week trial over the debacle that removed 1,250 of 13,000 seats from use for safety reasons such as missing guardrails.
Fans who had tickets for those seats were relocated to less desirable seats with obstructed views or were forced to stand throughout the game in which the Green Bay Packers defeated the Pittsburg Steelers.

Disgruntled fans appeal $76,000 ruling for Super Bowl seat mix-up

By Marice Richter
DALLAS (Reuters) - A group of disgruntled fans who sued the National Football League over a seating fiasco at the 2011 Super Bowl has appealed a $76,000 jury award in the hope of potentially receiving more money, the fans’ attorney said on Tuesday.
A federal jury in March ruled in favor of seven fans who claimed that the NFL breached its ticket contract with them by not having all temporary seats ready in time for the Super Bowl XLV game at the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium on Feb. 6, 2011.
The jury sided with the fans on most points and awarded individual amounts ranging from about $5,700 to $22,000.
In the appeal filed last week, fans argued that claims of fraud against the NFL and allegations of deceptive trade practices should not have been dismissed by the district court.
The fans also claimed that the Dallas Cowboys should not have been dismissed as a party to the lawsuit because of their contract with the NFL to deliver the seats and sell some tickets.
“If we are successful in the appeal, we will then be permitted to pursue additional fraud and punitive damages,” the fans’ attorney, Michael Avenatti, said.
At the time of the verdict, NFL attorney Thad Behrens said his clients were pleased there was no finding of fraud.
“We will be filing a response to the plaintiffs’ appeal in due course,” Behrens said on Tuesday.
NFL officials and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones expressed remorse in testimony during the two-week trial over the debacle that removed 1,250 of 13,000 seats from use for safety reasons such as missing guardrails.
Fans who had tickets for those seats were relocated to less desirable seats with obstructed views or were forced to stand throughout the game in which the Green Bay Packers defeated the Pittsburg Steelers.

(Reporting by Marice Richter; Editing by Peter Cooney)

Disgruntled fans appeal $76,000 ruling for Super Bowl seat mix-up

By Marice Richter
DALLAS (Reuters) - A group of disgruntled fans who sued the National Football League over a seating fiasco at the 2011 Super Bowl has appealed a $76,000 jury award in the hope of potentially receiving more money, the fans’ attorney said on Tuesday.
A federal jury in March ruled in favor of seven fans who claimed that the NFL breached its ticket contract with them by not having all temporary seats ready in time for the Super Bowl XLV game at the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium on Feb. 6, 2011.
The jury sided with the fans on most points and awarded individual amounts ranging from about $5,700 to $22,000.
In the appeal filed last week, fans argued that claims of fraud against the NFL and allegations of deceptive trade practices should not have been dismissed by the district court.
The fans also claimed that the Dallas Cowboys should not have been dismissed as a party to the lawsuit because of their contract with the NFL to deliver the seats and sell some tickets.
“If we are successful in the appeal, we will then be permitted to pursue additional fraud and punitive damages,” the fans’ attorney, Michael Avenatti, said.
At the time of the verdict, NFL attorney Thad Behrens said his clients were pleased there was no finding of fraud.
“We will be filing a response to the plaintiffs’ appeal in due course,” Behrens said on Tuesday.
NFL officials and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones expressed remorse in testimony during the two-week trial over the debacle that removed 1,250 of 13,000 seats from use for safety reasons such as missing guardrails.
Fans who had tickets for those seats were relocated to less desirable seats with obstructed views or were forced to stand throughout the game in which the Green Bay Packers defeated the Pittsburg Steelers.

(Reporting by Marice Richter; Editing by Peter Cooney)