royal british navy

  • Me: *likes Gal Gadot*
  • tumblr: u can't Like Gal Gadot she supports the military of her home country
  • Me: *likes Gal Gadot whilst glaring at the people trying to impose their own feelings towards her onto me*
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“British pilot rescued after Pacific action. June 1945, on board a carrier of the British Pacific Fleet operating against the Japanese. A British naval pilot who was shot down close inshore was rescued by a Supermarine Walrus amphibian aircraft which landed under the guns of Japanese coastal batteries, picked up the Avenger pilot and returned him to the deck of the carrier.”

(IWM: A 29813, A 29719)

History Fact 7/100 - Admiral Nelson

Viscount Horatio Nelson, the First Duke of Bronté, was a flag officer in the British Navy. He was born in Norfolk, the son of a clergyman, and one of eleven children. He joined the Royal Navy at twelve, and ascended to the rank of Captain by the time he was twenty.

During the French Revolution, Nelson was in command of the Agamemnon, a 64 gun third rate ship of the line.
Nelson became known as a bold, rational man, with occasional disregard for his senior officers. During the Battle of Copenhagen, in order to avoid withdrawing his ship, he put his telescope to his blind eye and claimed he couldn’t see the signal.

Nelson’s strategic excellence was crucial at the Battle of the Nile, where the English fleet successfully destroyed the fleet of Napoleon. His most famous battle is Cape Trafalgar, where he led the English against a combined fleet of the Spanish and French, protecting England from invasion. Nelson was killed during this battle as he paced the quarterdeck, shot by a French sniper.

The body of Admiral Nelson was transported back to England, and he was given a state funeral.

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British Pattern 1827 Naval Officer’s Sword

A George IV naval officer’s sword by Prosser, Maker to the King, H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral, with curved pipe back blade, length 76.5cm, brass hilt with folding guard retaining most original gilt finish, lion’s head pommel, wire bound sharkskin covered grip.

This beefy pipe-back blade is superior to those typically used for regulation pattern officers’ swords, being wider and thicker and better at cutting.

A and B turrets, HMS Hood 1940 HMS Hood’s forward 15" turrets, with a 4" gun’s crew under training in the foreground. The leading seaman, (noted) standing on the extreme left, behind the man with the 4" projectile, is leading seaman W Dowdell, who lost his life on 24 May 1941 along with 1414 other members of the ship’s company, there being just three survivors when the ship was sunk in action by the German battleship Bismarck.
Colourised by Royston Leonard

On February 14, 1779 Captain James Cook of the British Royal Navy was killed by natives in Kealakekua Bay, on the Big Island of Hawaii. Cook was a true savage, who sailed across the world bringing murder, rape, disease, and colonialism to native peoples all over the Pacific. When he was killed, Cook was trying to kidnap the Hawaiian Aliʻi (tribal chief) Kalaniʻōpuʻu in response to an unknown person stealing a small boat. In the process, he had threatened to open fire on the islanders. 

At this point, the Hawaiians decided they had enough of Cook’s bullshit. Realizing that he had been manipulating them throughout the course of his stay in Hawaii, witnessing the sexual depredations of Cook’s men, seeing how brutish and toxic European culture really was … and now being threatened with mass murder and the kidnapping of one of their tribal leaders, the Hawaiian islanders finally gave this piece of shit what he deserved: a beatdown on the beach, and a knife to the chest. This put an end to a lifetime of predatory behavior and conquest of lands in the service to the British empire.

So how about instead of celebrating a boring consumerist holiday like Valentine’s Day, we celebrate something awesome, like the death of Captain Cook … Happy Killed Captain Cook Day!