roots and target

Dragon Archery

New apparel needs some new headcanons~

Overall archery was popularized for being a quiet weapon in comparison to other draconian weaponry and spells. This made for both easier hunting and stealth warfare. Also arrows, unlike magical bolts, are harder to see flying at you if the arrows are not enchanted or modified.

WIND archers are the most famous. Its rumored that a well trained wind flighted archer can take on a raiding party alone with a single shot. They can curve their arrows in the air with the help of their elemental abilities, and release arrows at unbelievably rapid rates. Wind bows are the fastest and are designed for speed over power.

WATER archers are more close combat orientated. Their arrows have curved points and tethers that latch onto, tangle, and pull down targets to the (normally) water below- where they are never seen again. Water bows pack the most punch out of all flights hold earth because they are designed to be effective under water as well.

EARTH archers are steady and patient- as well as great trackers. Targets that are not taken down after the first shot tend to spend a entire day in hiding or running from its attackers, only to be taken down the moment they leave cover or let their guard down. There are many stories of great Earth archers who spend days to weeks on stakeouts for their targets. Earth bows and arrows are the heaviest hitting and can split rock.

FIRE archers are best at taking advantage of their surroundings. They use specialized fire arrows and often light fire to their targets as well as the surrounding area. Be very careful when taking cover from fire archers, because they will make that cover a tomb in a few firey seconds. Fire archers are also known for creating a smoke screen effect - tricking armys into thinking there are twice as many archers then there actually is. Like their armor, fire bows are known for their fine metal craftsmanship, being both balanced and covered in complex designs.

LIGHTNING archers are trickshooters - known for their ‘sky’ shots - firing an arrow up, so it hits the target from directly above like a thunder bolt. This allows them to hit targets taking cover behind things with no roof and use gravity to aid in the punch their arrow gives. Lightning arrows also hold charges very well, allowing them to shock and sometimes paralyze targets. Their bows are the most consistent and carfully made/tested in order to pull off advanced shots.

ICE archers are resourceful and good ambushers. Their native landscape doesn’t give alot of materials for arrows so they are often made of pure ice magic or ice shards that are lying around. The empty tundra pushed them into the art of camouflage- a ice archer can be right infront of you and you wouldn’t notice. Their bows are often modified to resemble twigs or old bones so you don’t reconize it as a bow.

SHADOW archers are frighteningly accurate and make the best bounty hunters. The best can snag a moth to a tree with their arrows - without killing it. Shadow archers like to stay hidden and work best in the dark where they can remain unseen. Some archers have skilled magic users lace curses or similar magical tricks into the tips of their arrows. Bow and arrows are best for being quiet - and shadows are the quietest of them all.

LIGHT archers are snipers, they can hit targets over great distances. Most dedicate their lives to protecting sacred ruins and villages - effectively getting rid of any trespassers before they get close. The bows and arrows are made for distance- meaning that the farther away you are the harder it hits. Their shots are fast, some say you hear a lights arrow coming after it hits you.

NATURE arrows are almost always laced with some kind of plant toxin. It doesn’t matter if the thorny wood arrow doesn’t hurt you too bad - because the poison most definitely will in 5…4…3…2… . Archery is popular in nature because they can hit targets without disrupting the surrounding flora. Skilled nature magic users can make living arrows that grow roots in and around their target after they hit. Normally doctors suggest you don’t rip arrows outta wounds so you dont bleed out - nature, plague, and arcane arrows are an acception to this rule.

PLAGUE archers, like nature, rely on whats in the arrow to do the killing rather than the arrow themselves. The arrow heads are narrow, curved like cat teeth, and loaded with pathogens. This makes accuracy hard but the wounds from these arrows not only instantly infect but are extremely hard to clean out. Because of this their bows are best for speed rather than punch - since the arrows don’t need alot of power behind them to be effective.

ARCANE archers are masters at firing off more than one arrow at a time. Behind wind archers, they are the most famed. Their arrow heads are made of Pink Chalcedony - a glass like rock that is abundant in their region that makes non arcane dragons ill. These arrow heads shatter half the time they hit their target and leave shrapnel inside of them. Their bows are more on the powerful side, to support firing multiple arrows at once, but lack range accuracy as a result.

6

Person Of Interest MemeFavourite Episodes → 2x02 Bad Code: Amazing. We’ve managed to perfect the apple–a genetically modified version that never goes brown. And yet, we still haven’t upgraded human beings. The human race has stalled out, Harold. And from what I’ve seen, most of it is rotten to the core.

10

The first project of the semester for my Illustration 2 class. We were to create a beverage, and design and construct the packaging for our beverage. In addition to the beverage mockup, we had to create a layout that shows the flat pieces our box was made of, as well as a digital 3D rendering of the box with the designs.

The beverage I came up with was called Goldilocks and the Root Bears, and it is an assorted root beer pack with a targeted audience of kids and parents who like quirky sodas. The package comes with 4 flavours: Papa Bear (regular root beer), Mama Bear (diet root beer), Baby Bear (vanilla root beer), and Goldilocks (cream soda).

I’ll take higher-quality pictures of the box once I have access to a better camera, but for now all I have are cell phone pictures U^U

The project took a total of one month, and it was a ton of work, but I am very excited about the outcome! :-)

anonymous asked:

RootxShaw prompt- Shaw takes Root to the restaurant where Shaw's father brought her mother on their first date. (From the episode "Allegiance" in season 3)

Shaw stood outside of the restaurant with her hands in the pockets of her trousers. She looked at her watch and looked down the street. She tucked same hair behind her ear that had fallen out of her low ponytail.

“Sorry I’m late,” Root appeared behind Shaw, startling the former assassin.

Shaw clenched her fists, “You have got to stop sneaking up on me.”

Root grinned. She moved her clutch from one hand to the other. She straightened out her short, tight dress, “Sorry. I have an irrelevant across the river.”

Shaw looked behind Root toward the water, “Did you steal a boat?”

Root nodded, “So you’ll have to excuse my hair.”

“It looks fine,” Shaw looked Root over and found that she looked normal save for the curls in her hair that were more loose than usual because of the wind on the water.

Root looked like she was about to take her words as a compliment so Shaw turned to walk inside. She told the matre’d about her reservation. He smiled politely at her and seated them.

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Champion Reveal: Ivern, the Green Father

IVERN, THE GREEN FATHER

Once, long ago, Ivern Bramblefoot was called Ivern the Cruel—that was before he tangled with a God-Willow. In the centuries since, Ivern has roamed the forests of Runeterra, cultivating life wherever he goes. Wildflowers bloom in his footsteps as he laughs with trees, plays tricks on rocks, and dines with moss on the sun’s delectable rays. When the Green Father traipses into your lane, he brings all the secrets of the forest along with him.

Passive: Friend of the Forest

Ivern loves jungle monsters and would never harm them. Instead, he sets them free! Clicking on any jungle camp creates a grove using some of Ivern’s health and mana. The grove matures over time; when fully grown it can be clicked on again to free the camp’s denizens, granting Ivern gold and XP. Smiting a camp with a grove on it instantly sends the monsters to safety.

After level five, the Green Father creates copies of the red and blue buff whenever he frees the Red Brambleback or Blue Sentinel—they’ll leave behind a sapling which can be picked up by allies.

Q: Rootcaller

Ivern shoots out a ropey root that deals magic damage and (as you’d expect) roots the first enemy it hits. Allies who use a basic attack on the rooted target will automatically dash to get within attack range.

W: Brushmaker

Passive: When hiding in brush, Ivern’s basic attacks have increased magic damage and range. This effect lasts for a couple seconds after Ivern leaves the brush.

Active: Ivern creates a patch of brush, temporarily revealing the area around it. The amount of brush created is slightly greater if it’s placed near a wall or any other brush. The Green Father’s grassy patches disappear on their own after a moderate delay.

E: Triggerseed

Ivern places a protective seed onto his ally, granting them a shield. After a short delay the seed explodes, damaging and slowing all nearby enemies.

R: Daisy!

Ivern summons Daisy, an enormous sentinel who loves hugs. Daisy scampers around joyfully, knocking up Ivern’s target after a few hits. Ivern can recast this ability to direct his boisterous friend toward new targets. She’ll hang around until her hankering for hugs has been satisfied, or until her health bar is depleted.

LANING PHASE AND THE MID-GAME

Who says supports have to hang in the bot lane? Ivern Bramblefoot is a true support-jungler, arguably the first of his kind. Most supports can’t hack it in jungle because they lack the sheer damage output to beat up rascally woodland creatures in a timely manner. Ivern gets around that with his ability to evacuate camps without ever fighting anything—the green man just tends to his groves and soon enough the critters go prancing away on their own, happily handing over their juicy XP and gold as they leave.

It only takes Ivern a few moments to lay down or harvest his grove on camps, so he has access to jungle routes that just aren’t an option for those who have to fight and kill their prey. One valid strategy: Take Smite and Teleport, then go into the enemy jungle and drop a ward near an entrance. After sprinting through and gettin’ grovey with all the camps, TP back to the starting point for another lap to set the whole zoo free.

A more common pattern will see Ivern dropping groves on all the camps in his own jungle, then using his remaining free time to prance into a lane for a quick gank. Regardless of whether the gank is successful, Ivern can then stroll back into the jungle to claim his ripe rewards.

“Whenever Ivern’s ganking,Brushmaker gives him a thick playbook of ways to sneak into side lanes. His brush doesn’t appear on opponents’ minimaps, so it’s on them to keep a close eye out for any creeping forestry sprouting up around them.”

Whenever Ivern’s ganking, Brushmaker gives him a thick playbook of ways to sneak into side lanes. His brush doesn’t appear on opponents’ minimaps, so it’s on them to keep a close eye out for any creeping forestry sprouting up around them. The bushes block off vision granted by minions, making it possible for Ivern to create a grassy curtain that’ll keep soon-to-be-rootcalledopponents in the dark.

Once the Green Father gets access to his old friend, Daisy, he’s got a powerful way to disrupt enemy carries and peel for his own backline. In some of those crucial early skirmishes (like for first dragon), a rampaging hug monster taking an ADC or mage out of the fight can be all your team needs to build a major lead.

TEAMFIGHTING AND LATE-GAME

Once the teamfight phase hits, Ivern’s role couldn’t be more clear: He’s there to make his team’s frontline more deadly. If the droll druid lands a Rootcaller on an enemy squishies, it grants every teammate within range a free dash toward the rooted target. One root hits, and all at once your friendly Braum’s giving ‘em a mouthful of mustache, your Vayne’s spouting condemnations, and your Garen’s in the spin zone.

Most of the time, you’ll want to save Triggerseed for that moment just after you’ve landed a sick pick with Rootcaller. Since the root’s dash effect is much greater on melee allies, you’ll probably want to grant them Triggerseed’s shielding and slowing properties. They can ride the root in, pop some fools with the bursting Triggerseed, then tank any retaliatory hits while the triggering intensifies. While all that’s going down, Mr. Bramblefoot is free to spank nearby baddies using the extended auto-attack range he receives while in brush.

The biggest benefit of Ivern’s brushmaking hobby is its potential to create mind games. Many of us have played on Summoner’s Rift for years at this point, and brush locations have been pretty consistent throughout. We unconsciously track our distance from any and all unwarded brush, taking pains not to facecheck it. So when you’re halfway down bot side’s river and find yourself encountering a whole grassy field, it can seriously mess with your mind.

The range on Brushmaker is crazy big, so Ivern can use it scare opponents into thinking he’s somewhere he’s not. Stand on one side of the midlane and drop a bunch of brush near the opposite side, just to drive them toward you. Or, just plant some on top of your own carries in the middle of a teamfight to make them untargetable.

“The range on Brushmaker is crazy big, so Ivern can use it scare opponents into thinking he’s somewhere he’s not. Stand on one side of the midlane and drop a bunch of brush near the opposite side, just to drive them toward you. Or, just plant some on top of your own carries in the middle of a teamfight to make them untargetable.”

Ivern’s designer, Blake 'Squad5’ Smith, says he once stole a dragon just by filling the pit up with grass and hanging out in it. When he smote the dragon for the kill, the other team didn’t think to check the grassy knoll where he was still hiding. Instead, everyone just wandered off, dejected, and recalled to base. Victory through trickery: the true way of the Green Father.

anonymous asked:

How do you keep yourself motivated for learning languages?

I guess since I have deeply rooted reasons for learning my target languages I don’t get that discouraged? For example, with Russian, I began to learn it by taking an intensive course where I spent about 8 hours or more a day with Russian work/classes. Most people were exhausted by Russian, but I was happy to be studying Russian since I have been in love with the language and dreamt of reading novels in the original (which I am now doing!!), changing my major to it. So dreams do come true…  

Another thing is that I always try to include cultural aspects into language learning since culture is often tied to language. At my uni this was easier since my professors already included this in class and I could always go to an x club meeting, a discussion about x’s politics,literature or history, a student concert of certain music from x region, speak face-to-face with native speakers, etc. By doing this, one stops seeing X as just a “language I’d like to learn” and more as a tool of communication for X’s culture (idk if that is the right phrasing). 

Again, this is just me and different people have their reasons. Could I suggest reading about the history of the country where X is spoken, finding music or movies in X language, reading English translation of important works in X language (or the originals if you want a challenge), try learning about customs of the countries where X is spoken, look up recipes from the country where X is spoken, learn proverbs from the language. These are all things that you could do whenever you feel discouraged and you will end up understanding the language a bit more (hopefully).

My friend wanted me to draw Hijack Anime Tropes so:

Jack: Typical Tsundere Animu Protagonist (Like this)

Hiccup: The Snarky Best Friend Whose Been In Love With The Protagonist For Years And Has Hid His Feelings Because He Doesn’t Want To Pressure Them Into A Relationship AKA The One We Are ALL Rooting For And Hoping Their Target Of Affection Would Stop Being Such An IDIOT And Just Admit They Like Him (Kinda Like this)

Champion Reveal: Jhin

Jhin’s assembling his gun and orchestrating his grand entrance onto the Rift. He’s meticulous and calculating - League’s slowest marksman yet. But when the murderous artist gets you in his sights, when he catches you off-guard, there’s not much that’ll save you from an inevitable, perfect death.


PASSIVE: WHISPER

Jhin’s gun - Whisper - chambers four shots, the last of which always crits and applies extra damage based on a portion of his target’s missing health. After firing all four shots, Jhin takes a moment to reload.

Jhin’s crits deal less damage than normal, and his attack speed doesn’t actually scale with attack speed. Instead, Jhin gains attack damage from any attack speed and crit chance he earns through itemization and runes, while crits give him a burst of movement based on his attack speed.

Q: DANCING GRENADE

Jhin throws a cannister at a nearby targeted enemy. After landing, the cannister bounces up to four times on other nearby enemies. Killing an enemy with Dancing Grenade causes the following bounces to deal extra damage.

W: DEADLY FLOURISH

Passive: Enemy champions that have been struck by Jhin’s basic attacks, Captive Audience, or any allied damage are marked for a few seconds.

Active: Jhin fires a massively long range shot that damages all enemy minions and the first enemy champion in a target direction. If the enemy champion he strikes has already been marked, they’re briefly rooted, while Jhin himself gains a burst of movement speed.

E: CAPTIVE AUDIENCE

Jhin places a trap on the ground that turns invisible after arming. Enemy champions that walk over the trap trigger it, revealing and marking them with Deadly Flourish and creating a large slowing zone. After a brief pause, the trap detonates, damaging all enemies inside its explosion.

R: CURTAIN CALL

Jhin fully assembles his weapon before taking aim in a target direction, revealing all marked targets in a huge area. He can then fire four rounds that stop at the first enemy champion struck, slowing them and dealing damage based on their missing health. Jhin’s fourth and final shot with Curtain Call deals massively increased damage and is guaranteed to crit.


LANING

Jhin’s a different kind of marksman. While most look to whittle their opponents down with a constant barrage of sapping attacks, Jhin’s fastidious to the extreme, and thrives when he handpicks his opportunities to strike. In lane, he’s best off saving his valuable bullets for last-hitting, keeping track of his ammo count and looking for moments when he can expend his fourth bullet - his deadliest - on his lane opponent. Jhin’s basic attack range is distinctly average at best, making him relatively easy to harass in lane. That’s where the Virtuoso can turn to Dancing Grenade, using the bouncing cannister to secure last hits from relative safety, and even apply effective harassment if his opponents stick too close to their minion waves.

Still, Jhin’s low attack speed will often see him pushed under tower, and having to fire off his shots to last hit instead of harass. Here’s the thing, though: when Jhin correctly plans for this, when he places a few of his Captive Audience traps as he falls back, he’ll be perfectly placed to call on his jungler and slowly close the noose around his hapless opponents’ necks. As the gank starts, Jhin and his allies work best initiating the attack and corralling their targets towards their pre-set traps. Once they trigger, Jhin can follow up immediately with Deadly Flourish, damaging his target and rooting them inside the trap’s slow zone as it ticks down toward zero. The explosion, which they’re now guaranteed to be caught inside, chunks them down further, setting the stage for Jhin’s fourth and final bullet. They’ll die, one way or another.

Traps being traps, they also make perfect defensive cover for Jhin when he decides to aim his iron sights at his enemies and get aggressive. While these opportunities are rare, a fortuitous crit against a weakened enemy doesn’t just give Jhin the chance to kill his target, but also the means to chase. Jhin excels here, following up on enemy marks with Deadly Flourish to root his target as he blows them away with basic attacks. Overextending generally attracts enemy junglers, of course, but if Jhin manages to pull the trigger on his fourth and final shot, the guaranteed crit (and therefore guaranteed speed boost) should help him speed away as his would-be killer slogs through the Virtuoso’s traps.

A fortuitous crit against a weakened enemy doesn’t just give Jhin the chance to kill his target, but also the means to chase.

SKIRMISHING

Once he’s set up, Jhin’s great at objective control, thanks in part to his traps. By placing Captive Audience traps on the enemy team’s easiest path to dragon, Jhin earns his team advance notice of any impending arrivals, and can temporarily root marked enemy junglers with Deadly Flourish. Even if they continue their advance, Jhin can throw in a Dancing Grenade to apply damage to grouped enemies before carefully picking off his targets with basic attacks. He’s poor at securing objectives himself - his slow attack speed alone sees to that - but he gives his team a huge boost toward securing objectives when he plans out and prepares for the fight in the areas around them.

Then there’s Jhin’s ultimate. Curtain Call gives Jhin and his team huge leverage over objectives when the Virtuoso is able to set up and prepare his sniper nest. The ability has huge range, but only within a set angle, giving Jhin a few key considerations to think about as he searches for his grassy knoll. Set up too close and he’ll make an easy target for enemy assassins; too far and he’ll render himself irrelevant after he’s spent his ult; set uppoorly and he’ll risk losing sight of the battle as it shifts around. Get his position just right and Jhin will wreak havoc from afar before moving in to finish the fight up close.

Jhin gives his team a huge boost toward securing objectives when he plans out and prepares for the fight in the areas around them.

TEAMFIGHTS

Jhin has two viable strategies in teamfights: either appear at the start of the battle, or at the end. If he chooses to stick with his team, he takes up a traditional backline position, setting up traps to protect his fellow squishes while aiming Deadly Flourish at marked targets. Dancing Grenade only adds to the carnage, and when the enemy team starts to flee, Jhin’s perfectly positioned to fully assemble Whisper and cut the remaining enemies down with Curtain Call.

Alternatively, Jhin can choose to set the stage early by firing off his ult first. This makes him an unusual character in a teamfight because he won’t actually be seen, at least initially. And while enemy teams might first revel in the apparently lopsided fight, they’ll quickly realize that the Virtuoso’s absence is deliberate. Jhin’s presence may not be felt, but his bullets absolutely will. Curtain Call deals less damage to high health enemies, but the ability’s slow will hinder enemy frontliners from getting to where they want to be, and stop vulnerable enemies from squirming away from Jhin’s damage dealing allies. More importantly, Curtain Call will start to pin Jhin’s enemies down, forcing them to hide behind their tankier allies or run for cover. And even when his ult’s spent, Jhin can contribute to fights, locking down marked targets with Deadly Flourish so his allies can clean up the fight and push on toward victory.

i swear to fucking god if these dumb asses don’t get rid of paulie during the double eviction i am going to burn down the big brother house. 

it’s kinda fucked up how paul’s playing the best game right now and will likely win the season but if a woman had come in and played his exact same game she 100% would’ve been evicted pre-jury

Warlords of Draenor - 6.0 Patch Note Preview Warrior

Warrior

  • Warriors have been nerfed because reasons.
  • Charge no longer stuns a target, and instead roots them for 1.5 seconds.
  • New ability: Heroic Sit. All that mobility makes Warriors tired. Using Charge more than once in a 10-minute period now applies the “I’m tiiiiiired” debuff, which can be removed by employing Heroic Sit. Heroic Sit roots the Warrior in place, puts on the ballgame, and gives the Warrior an ice-cold giggle juice.
  • Charge no longer roots a target, and instead stuns them for 1.5 seconds.
  • Intervene can now be used when your one friend gets out of hand at the bar again because he can NOT go back to County.
  • Charge no longer roots or stuns a target, and instead Polymorphs them for 1.5 seconds.
  • Shockwave is now aGlyph of Rude Interruption is here too! How’s it going? Just wanted to say hey.
  • Charge is now a passive effect.
  • Disarm now correctly removes the targets’ arms.
  • You know what? Charge has been removed from the game. OK? Great job. We hope you’re happy.
  • The Protection passive Ultimatum just isn’t going to put up with it anymore. It’s either me or her, Jerry!

Body shaming only contributes to the deep-rooted emotional problems that caused targeted people to have a distorted relationship with food in the first place. It’s not “inspirational” or “motivational” to dehumanize someone to the point of tears in an effort to inspire a lifestyle change, it just makes them feel like they’re not good enough because your definition of “beautiful” excludes bodies that aren’t glorified by the media.