romanian-folk-song

Fată Verde / Zburător aesthetic

Fată Verde is an old romanian folk-rock song (the song here) about a “Green Girl” with “forest hair”. The night weaves her a “ie” (romanian traditional blouse) for the Flyer’s visit.

Zburător / Flyer is a romanian folklore roving spirit who makes love to maidens by night. He appears as a ghost, as a shooting star, sometimes winged, coming down in the shape of an incredible handsome man and, sometimes, in the shape of the man the girl loves, although he cannot be seen by other people. He is actually the personification of the intense feelings of erotic desire and longing for a man. They met and consume their love in the world of dreams but everything is so intense, almost real that the young woman becomes exhausted and obsessively in love. Some old books even tell stories about young girls haunted by this mysterious man, becoming so desperately in love that they started acting like lunatics, walking almost undressed and untidy, obviously exhausted and sometimes semi conscious.

The “zburător” or “sburător” can also refer to a demon that takes the shape of a young handsome man, visiting women in their sleep: incubus. 

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Constantin Brâncuși“Work like a slave, command like a king, create like a god.”

Constantin Brâncuși (February 19, 1876 – March 16, 1957) was a Romanian sculptor, painter and photographer who made his career in France. 

Considered a pioneer of modernism, one of the most influential sculptors of the 20th-century, Brâncuși is called the patriarch of modern sculpture

As a child he displayed an aptitude for carving wooden farm tools. Formal studies took him first to Bucharest, then to Munich, then to the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris from 1905 to 1907. 

His art emphasizes clean geometrical lines that balance forms inherent in his materials with the symbolic allusions of representational art

Brâncuși sought inspiration in non-European cultures as a source of primitive exoticism, but other influences emerge from Romanian folk art traceable through Byzantine and Dionysian traditions.

Brâncuși always dressed in the simple ways the Romanian peasants did. His studio was reminiscent of the houses of the peasants from his native region: there was a big slab of rock as a table and a primitive fireplace, similar to those found in traditional houses in his native Oltenia, while the rest of the furniture was made by him out of wood. Brâncuși would cook his own food, traditional Romanian dishes, with which he would treat his guests.

Brâncuși held a large spectrum of interests, from science to music. He was a good violinist and he would sing old Romanian folk songs, often expressing by them his feelings of homesickness. After the installment of communism, he never considered moving back to his native Romania, but he did visit it eight times.

Brâncuși died on March 16, 1957, aged 81. He was buried in the Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris. This cemetery also displays statues that Brâncuși carved for deceased artists.

At his death Brâncuși left 1200 photographs and 215 sculptures. He bequeathed part of his collection to the French state, after it was refused by the Romanian Communist government, on condition that his workshop be rebuilt as it was on the day he died. This reconstruction of his studio, adjacent to the Pompidou Centre, is open to the public

Brâncuși’s works are housed in the National Museum of Art of Romania (Bucharest), the Museum of Modern Art (New York) and other museums around the world. The Philadelphia Museum of Art holds the largest collection of Brâncuși sculptures in the United States.


Representative works (as shown in the above photos): The Gate of Kiss, Mademoiselle Pogany, The Table of Silence, The Endless Column;

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Rotting Christ–  cine iubeste si lasa

Greek black metal meets Romanian folk song.