roman arches

6

Arc de Berà

Catalonia, Spain

13 BCE

10.14 m. high

The Arc de Berà (sometimes written Barà) is a triumphal arch some 20 km north-east of the city of Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, close to Roda de Barà. It stands on the line of what was the Via Augusta.

Its name derives from the count Berà (first count of Barcelona from 801 - 820). It is a triumphal arch with a single opening consisting of a central body on a podium, decorated with fluted pilasters crowned by Corinthian capitals. The upper part of the construction is an entablature made up of architrave, frieze and cornice. The stone used is probably from a local quarry.

The monument was built as a result of the will of Lucius Licinius Sura and it was erected in the reign of Augustus, around 13 BCE. The surviving inscription reads: “Ex testamento L(uci) Licini L(uci) f(ilii) Serg(ia tribu) Surae consa[…]”. It is thought it was dedicated to Augustus or to his genius, and that it marked the limit of the district of Tarraco.

If the Arch of Titus looks familiar to you, it’s probably because the monument is the inspiration for Paris’ Arc de Triomphe. 

Arch of Titus, Rome, Italy 

4

Porta Nigra 

Trier, Germany

200 CE


The Porta Nigra was built in grey sandstone between 186 and 200 CE. The original gate consisted of two four-storied towers, projecting as near semicircles on the outer side. A narrow courtyard separated the two gate openings on either side. For unknown reasons, however, the construction of the gate remained unfinished. For example, the stones at the northern (outer) side of the gate were never abraded, and the protruding stones would have made it impossible to install movable gates. Nonetheless, the gate was used for several centuries until the end of the Roman era in Trier. It serves as an entrance to town.

In Roman times, the Porta Nigra was part of a system of four city gates, one of which stood at each side of the roughly rectangular Roman city. The Porta Nigra guarded the northern entry to the Roman city, while the Porta Alba (White Gate) was built in the east, the Porta Media (Middle Gate) in the south, and the Porta Inclyta (Famous Gate) in the west, next to the Roman bridge across the Moselle. The gates stood at the ends of the two main streets of the Roman Trier, one of which led north-south and the other east-west. Of these gates, only the Porta Nigra still exists today.

2

Heidentor

Carnuntum, Austria

4th century CE

15 m. in height

Between 354 CE and 361 CE a huge triumphal monument was erected next to the camp and city. Contemporary reports suggest that Emperor Constantius II had it built to commemorate his victories. When the remains of Carnuntum disappeared after the Migration Period the monument remained as an isolated building in a natural landscape and led Medieval people to believe it was the tomb of a pagan giant. Hence, they called it “Heidentor” (pagan gate). 

4

Arch of Trajan

Timgad, Algeria

2nd century CE

12 m.  in height

The three vaulted arch composed the western gate of the city, at the beginning of the decumanus maximus and the end of the road coming from Lambaesis.

The arch reaches a height of 12 metres, with a central arch of 6 metres in height which permitted the passage of vehicles that have left deep ruts in the ground under the archway).

The lateral arches, each 3.75 metres high, were reserved for pedestrians. Above the lateral arches on both sides are deep rectangular niches, framed by aediculae with smooth-stemmed Corinthian columns of coloured marble supported by shelves. The niches were designed to hold statues which are now lost. The whole assemblage of each lateral arch and niche was framed by two red corinthian columns, detached from the walls and supported by pedestals. The entablature that runs across the wall above the lateral arches, protrudes above the columns and a curvilinear pediment rests on it in turn. The attic must have been surmounted with a group of monumental statues.

Other sculpture was added to the arch in later times. This includes a statue of Mars and one of Concordia erected under Emperor Septimius Severus by Lucius Licinius Optatianus, on the occasion of his election as flamen-for-life of the colonia.

5

Roman x Reader

Requested By Anon

Warnings: smut, sex


“Don’t we look cute.” Roman called across the corridor, whistling at you as you walked past.

“What do you want Roman?” You mumbled shyly, not looking him in the eye.

“Well, can I, have you?” He asked and smiled when he saw you blushing. “I know a little private place we could skip class…”

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Excepting Anxiety

General Taglist:  @thebeautyofthomas @frustratedwaffle @killerfangirl3 @pippa-frost @extreme-doodles @fandomsofrandom

Story Notes: During the filming of the Accepting Anxiety story arc, Roman struggles with some parts of the script. 

Pairing: Prinxiety (platonic or romantic)

CW: Self-doubt, mild cursing

*

After the fifth time Roman messed up his lines, Thomas decided they could all use a break. 

There was no mistaking the frustration in his voice as he said it, though, and Roman cringed as their host sent him a glance that was a mixture of bewilderment and strained patience. 

“We’ll try again in a little while,” Thomas said. “I’m going to go get something to eat. Patton, you want to help me?” 

“Sounds good, kiddo,” Patton agreed, though not before reaching out and squeezing Roman’s shoulder comfortingly. “I think a few cookies are definitely in order.” 

Logan watched them heading into the kitchen, then turned to Roman. “You do seem to be having a difficult time today,” he stated. “Would it perhaps help if I were to run lines with you?”  

“No, I’m–I’m good,” Roman mumbled, waving him off.

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