roguesquid

roguesquid asked:

Hello :) Thank you for identifying the turtle! I wasn't sure if it was a snapping turtle or not. I've seen, similar, smaller turtles before in my town, but never one this big! (She was slightly bigger than a basketball.)

No problem :) the thickness of the neck, shape of the head, and low shell were giveaways before I even got to see the serrated caudal area of the shell. Nice to see a big healthy turtle doing her thang.

RogueSquid says:Puffins - Picking up a box of Puffins Peanut Butter Cereal, finding it super delicious, I noticed the inside of the box had Puffin facts. Puffins, when on land, stay alert for predatory birds like the Great Black-backed Gulls and Peregrine Falcons. Their most dangerous predators are the mink and otters, who can get into the puffins’ burrows. At sea, Puffins are also threatened by the Goosefish when they are diving for food. Their food consists of small fish and shrimp, which we tend to over fish, threatening their supply. Not only that but humans also threaten the lives of Puffins by trash, ie: fishing nets, causing drowning and the use of poisons like DDT or oil spills.”

Decades-old pollution loophole still burns people of color and the poor | Grist

RogueSquid says: “Petrochemical companies + U.S. - Refineries and other industrial plants in the United States have to apply for government-issued permits to secrete toxins and other pollutants into the air. This is to keep people from getting sick or even dying and to keep track of the levels of secretion. The companies involved can use loopholes such as the ‘Start-up Shutdown Malfunction’ which will allow some facilities to release premature/post-operational emissions without being penalized. What is released during that time can reach well over the safe limit and poison the air.
Unfortunately, many of the polluters are located near residential homes and most are found near lower-income families. Those afflicted cannot afford to move away or find a better location to breathe easier and have a safe place for their children to grow. There are no safe levels of soot for humans to breathe and those who breathe some in? Immediately increase their risk of meeting their maker early in life.

(via Decades-old pollution loophole still burns people of color and the poor | Grist)

RogueSquid says: “Do you live in New England? Well, you can find ‘sites’ that are located in New England that need or are being monitored for an environmental clean up… as long as you know your zip code. Check it out! You may find a place you didn’t know needed it. Remember to stay informed on what is around you, so you can stay safe & healthy.

Have you heard of Superfund? Superfund is the name of an environmental program that monitors sites that have hazardous wastes, and have been abandoned. The process is rather complex and you can find a list here. But the other abilities that Superfund has are:

Although it is a complex process, it is at least being handled in what is deemed appropriate & tries to make living around these sites safer.”

RogueSquid says: “Monsanto has bought Climate Corp, which is bad news for everyone but more importantly anyone involved in the agricultural business. Now that they have control, they can force farmers into buying their products: seeds, chemicals, data and services. Of course, this means that farmers who are now relying on the seeds and chemicals, will be under Monsanto’s thumb. Whose to say that Monsanto won’t refuse farmers seeds and chemicals, if they refuse to buy into Climate Corp? This could be bad news or it may work in our favor, convincing farmers to look for a different supplier.”