rocket stage

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India sets new world record, launching 104 satellites at once.

Creating a new world record in the process, India successfully kicked off their 217 launch calendar February 14 by launching a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle with 104 satellites. The rocket launched at 10:58pm EST from the Satish Dhawan Space Center.

Lofted into a sun-synchronous orbit by the rocket’s fourth stage, 101 cubesats accompanied three larger satellites on the mission. CartoSat-2D is the fourth in a series of high-resolution Earth-imaging satellites domestically designed by India. Less than ten seconds after CartoSat-2D was deployed, the INA-1A and 1B satellites were released. These two satellites are technology demonstrators for a new, smaller satellite bus that India hopes can attract universities and small businesses for space-based payloads.

Of the 101 cubesats deployed, 88 belonged to the Planet company, which - when combined with 100 identical satellites already in polar orbit- will photograph the entire surface of the Earth every day. Eight other cubesats belonged to Spire Global, and will measure atmospheric conditions and global shipping traffic. The remaining five are scientific and communication technology demonstrators

ISRO - the Indian Space Research organization - released a stunning video of the PSLV launch, the first time footage from onboard rocket cameras have been released. Key events in the rocket’s ascent can be seen, including the jettisoning of its six strap-on solid rocket motors, separation of its second and third stages, and jettisoning of the payload fairing. 

P/C: ISRO

When people have their biases and prejudices, yes, I am aware. My head is not in the sand. But my thing is, if I can’t work with you, I will work around you. I was not about to be [so] discouraged that I’d walk away. That may be a solution for some people, but it’s not mine.
— 

Annie J. Easley

Annie J. Easley (April 23, 1933 – June 25, 2011) was an African-American computer scientist, mathematician, and rocket scientist.

She worked for the Lewis Research Center (now Glenn Research Center) of NASA and its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA).

She was a leading member of the team which developed software for the Centaur rocket stage and one of the first African-Americans to work as a computer scientist at NASA.

Cover of Science and Engineering Newsletter featuring Easley at the Lewis Research Center. Image source: NASA
 

reuters.com
SpaceX launches first rocket since explosion, returns stage to earth
SpaceX aims to launch 27 rockets in 2017, more than triple the eight flights the privately held firm managed in 2016, according to a report on Friday in the Wall Street Journal.

A SpaceX Falcon rocket blasted off from California on Saturday, returning the company to flight for the first time since a fiery launchpad explosion in September.

The launch of the 230-foot (70-meter) rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 9:54 a.m. PST (1754 GMT) aimed to deliver 10 satellites into orbit for Iridium Communications Inc.

SpaceX’s founder and entrepreneur Elon Musk’s ambitious flight plans had been grounded since the Sept. 1 explosion during fueling ahead of a pre-flight test in Florida.

About 10 minutes after Saturday’s launch, the first stage of the rocket, which had separated from the rest of craft, successfully touched down on a platform in the Pacific Ocean, a feat previously accomplished by four other returning Falcon rockets. SpaceX intends to reuse its rockets to cut costs.

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4K @ 60Hz, enough said

A Centaur upper stage in the factory, sometime in the 1960s. This one would’ve been used as an upper stage on an Atlas rocket, unless it was sitting in storage for several years. For all I know, this could’ve been the upper stage on some really interesting mission.

Just look at the engine system, though! Very very cool.

Rheintöchter R-1, prototype German SAM missile manufactured by Rheinmetall-Borsig

The name derives from the mythical Rheintöchter (something like the maidens of the Rhine), taken from the opera Der Ring des Nibelungen by Richard Wagner.
Charged by the Heer in November 1942, tests with the missile carrying an explosive head of 136 kg. They began in August 1943, performing 82 shots, counting also with a version to be released from an airplane. The R1 was the initial version, and was propelled by a solid two-stage rocket engine, having flares installed at the wing tips for flight control. Because the R-1 was not able to reach great heights, the R-3 was developed, which was powered by a liquid fuel rocket motor and by solid fuel boosters. Finally the project was canceled on 6 February 1945

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SpaceX launches rocket from historic NASA launchpad

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Following in trails blazed by Saturn V moon rockets and space shuttles, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasted off Sunday morning from a storied Kennedy Space Center launch site on a mission to resupply the International Space Station.

The 210-foot rocket carrying a Dragon cargo craft quickly disappeared into clouds after the 9:39 a.m. liftoff from KSC’s pad 39A, where Apollo astronauts launched to the moon and shuttle astronauts last set sail nearly six years ago.

Minutes later, the rocket’s first stage did something the historic missions never contemplated, flipping around above the atmosphere and flying back to Cape Canaveral for a soft landing that unleashed powerful sonic booms across the area.

кошкин дом

A classic cautionary tale for children. The protagonists, a pair of kittens, inadvertently torch their home while trying to launch a multi-stage rocket from their kitchen.

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For the first time in 2,044 days, a rocket is perched atop historic Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center. SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket arrived at the pad early this morning, February 10, ahead of an upcoming static fire test.

The former Apollo and Shuttle era launch pad last saw a space vehicle in July of 2011 when the final space shuttle mission, STS-135, launched. NASA continued to operate the pad until early 2015, when SpaceX leased it for Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy operations. This historic event marks the third rocket to fly from LC-39A behind the Saturn V moon rocket and space shuttle.

SpaceX will perform a static fire test sometime Saturday to test the rocket’s systems. Once complete, the rocket will return to the Horizontal Integration Facility for mating with the Dragon spacecraft.

Falcon 9 will perform its east-coast return to flight with the CRS-10 mission to the International Space Station, slated for February 18. Following liftoff, the rocket’s first stage will return to Cape Canaveral for a landing at LZ-1, the third time the company has done so.

Below, the Falcon 9 rocket is seen prior to being erected vertical at LC-39A.(Photo credit: William Harwood/CBS.)

P/C: Elon Musk/William Harwood.

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SPRA line thrower

Designed by Alfred James Schermuly and produced during the 1920′s as the Schermuly Pistol Rocket Apparatus.
1 ¾" caliber muzzle fitted over a 1″/26,5mm pistol section.

The SPRA was used by sailors to throw lines of rope to runaway boats or overboard crew. It used a two-stage rocket propelled by a blank cartridge, giving it its proper course, and an internal charge to fly it the rest of the way.

three Schermuly rockets

These guns were conversion of the ubiquitous ‘Very’ flare guns manufactured by Webley, in these cases the MkV and MkIII variants.

a Webley and Scott N°1 MkV flare pistol

SpaceX Booster Lands Successfully After ISS Resupply Launch

A SpaceX Dragon craft made a successful launch on February 19 carrying supplies to the International Space Station. The rocket’s first stage booster touched down after the launch, the company’s eighth successful vertical booster landing.

The launch was scheduled for February 18, but was delayed to allow for testing of a steering piston in one of the rocket’s upper stages, Elon Musk, SpaceX’s chief executive, said.

The rocket blasted off from launch complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center. The pad was once used to launch NASA’s Apollo moon program but hadn’t been in operation since the discontinuation of the space shuttle program. Credit: SpaceX via Storyful

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And through the clouds, emerged the #SpaceX #CRS10 #Falcon9 first stage.

Here is the landing, as seen from the NASA Causeway: the rocket emerging from the clouds descending to Landing Zone 1. It was visible for approximately 8 seconds, and I’ve slowed it here about 50%. As the rocket landed safely, the very top was still visible over the trees.

And in case you don’t already know, watching it in HD = best.

(Photos and sequence by +MichaelSeeley / We Report Space)

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SpaceX is preparing for their return to flight mission following September’s Amos-6 incident. While there is no official launch date released from either SpaceX or the Federal Aviation Administration, recent activity at Vandenberg Air Force Base has shown that the return to flight mission is upcoming. The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage arrived in late November, and the satellites were fueled and encapsulated in the payload fairing Christmas week.

In the image above, released by Iridium, shows the ten satellites of their NEXT constellation as they undergo stacking prior to encapsulation. Falcon 9 will loft all ten satellites at once in a dispenser specially designed by SpaceX. A total of 81 satellites will replace Iridium’s original constellation of telecommunication satellites over the course of a year and a half.

The Amos-6 explosion heavily damaged SpaceX’s Florida launch pad at SLC-40. LC-39A, also owned by SpaceX, spent the latter half of 2016 undergoing final preparations for activation, and will see a launch in early 2017. SpaceX will use LC-39A for all Florida-based launches until SLC-40 has been repaired.

SpaceX operates SLC-3W at Vandenberg in California, where they have launched two missions thus far.

The Falcon 9 rocket that will launch the first Iridium NEXT constellation is seen arriving at Vandenberg Air Force Base’s SLC-3W in November.

Artists impression of an Iridium NEXT satellite on-orbit with solar arrays deployed.

SpaceX Makes Successful Launch to ISS After One-Day Delay

A SpaceX Dragon craft made a successful launch on February 19 carrying supplies to the International Space Station. The rocket’s first stage booster touched down after the launch, the company’s eighth successful vertical booster landing.

The launch was scheduled for February 18, but was delayed to allow for testing of a steering piston in one of the rocket’s upper stages, Elon Musk, SpaceX’s chief executive said.

The rocket blasted off from launch complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center. The pad was once used to launch NASA’s Apollo moon program but hadn’t been in operation since the discontinuation of the space shuttle program. Credit: NASA via Storyful

The first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket lands at Landing Zone 1 (former Launch Complex 13) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, 8:38 pm EST, December 21, 2015.

Nine minutes earlier, at 8:29 pm, the Falcon 9 lifted off from SLC-40 with 11 Orbcomm OG2 satellites. This was the first time in history an orbital rocket landed successfully and recovered following launch.

Full video of the landing from a SpaceX Hexacopter drone can be seen here.