rocket stage

23 Black Female Scientists Who Changed The Damn World

Okay so prior to Alice, people had known for hundreds of years that a potential treatment to leprosy existed in the form of something called Chaulmoogra oil. It was too thick to effectively circulate through the body, but Alice Ball, science prodigy and chemist extraordinaire, was the one who FINALLY figured how to turn it into a working treatment. It’s thanks to her that a leprosy crisis was avoided in the early 1900s. Bless you, Alice.

Stay with me for a second because this is actual rocket science. Centaur is a second-stage rocket launcher: the workhorse of the rocket world used to propel countless probes and satellites into space. It’s been invaluable to NASA since its creation, first allowing the U.S. to catch up to the Soviet Union during the space race, and eventually propelling spacecrafts to land on the moon and fly by other planets in the solar system.

So yes: Annie Easley helped DO that. She also contributed energy research to power plants and electronic batteries, which enabled the creation of hybrid vehicles. Go ahead and thank Annie for those, too.

Prior to Jeanne, the impact of discrimination and its accompanying stress factors were rarely explored or acknowledged in relationship to health. She also researched the impact of racism on childhood development and ways to approach therapy that addressed the needs of people of color. And Jeanne broke a ton of ground for black psychologists through her roles in academia and her publications.

Jewel researched ways to alter cell growth AND experimented with growing human tumor tissue outside of the human body to use for cancer treatment tests (instead of testing on living people). As if that wasn’t enough, she also helped to form the National Science Foundation’s Committee on Women and Minorities in Science.

The chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission monitors the byproduct of nuclear reactors, so it’s a pretty big deal. Shirley also served on a bunch of advisory boards for international security and energy, AND she was the first black woman to get a Ph.D from MIT.

See the full list:

23 Black Female Scientists Who Changed The Damn World

instagram

Landing

Science in Space!

What science is headed to the International Space Station with Orbital ATK’s cargo resupply launch? From investigations that study magnetic cell culturing to crystal growth, let’s take a look…

Orbital ATK is targeted to launch its Cygnus spacecraft into orbit on April 18, delivering tons of cargo, supplies and experiments to the crew onboard.

Efficacy and Metabolism of Azonafide Antibody-Drug Conjugates in Microgravity Investigation

In microgravity, cancer cells grow in 3-D. Structures that closely resemble their form in the human body, which allows us to better test the efficacy of a drug. This experiment tests new antibody drug conjugates.

These conjugates combine an immune-activating drug with antibodies and target only cancer cells, which could potentially increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy and potentially reduce the associated side-effects. Results from this investigation could help inform drug design for cancer patients, as well as more insight into how microgravity effects a drug’s performance.

Genes in Space

The Genes in Space-2 experiment aims to understand how the regulation of telomeres (protective caps on the tips of chromosomes) can change during spaceflight. Julian Rubinfien, 16-year-old DNA scientist and now space researcher, is sending his experiment to space as part of this investigation. 

3-D Cell Culturing in Space

Cells cultured in space spontaneously grow in 3-D, as opposed to cells cultured on Earth which grow in 2-D, resulting in characteristics more representative of how cells grow and function in living organisms. The Magnetic 3-D Cell Culture for Biological Research in Microgravity investigation will test magnetized cells and tools that may make it easier to handle cells and cell cultures.

This could help investigators improve the ability to reproduce similar investigations on Earth.

SUBSA

The Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) investigation was originally operated successfully aboard the space station in 2002. 

Although it has been updated with modernized software, data acquisition, high definition video and communications interfaces, its objective remains the same: advance our understanding of the processes involved in semiconductor crystal growth. 

Space Debris

Out-of-function satellites, spent rocket stages and other debris frequently reenter Earth’s atmosphere, where most of it breaks up and disintegrates before hitting the ground. However, some larger objects can survive. The Thermal Protection Material Flight Test and Reentry Data Collection (RED-Data2) investigation will study a new type of recording device that rides alongside of a spacecraft reentering the Earth’s atmosphere. Along the way, it will record data about the extreme conditions it encounters, something scientists have been unable to test on a large scale thus afar.

Understanding what happens to a spacecraft as it reenters the atmosphere could lead to increased accuracy of spacecraft breakup predictions, an improved design of future spacecraft and the development of materials that can resist the extreme heat and pressure of returning to Earth. 

IceCube CubeSat

IceCube, a small satellite known as a CubeSat, will measure cloud ice using an 883-Gigahertz radiometer. Used to predict weather and climate models, IceCube will collect the first global map of cloud-induced radiances. 

The key objective for this investigation is to raise the technology readiness level, a NASA assessment that measures a technology’s maturity level.

Advanced Plant Habitat

Joining the space station’s growing list of facilities is the Advanced Plant Habitat, a fully enclosed, environmentally controlled plant habitat used to conduct plant bioscience research. This habitat integrates proven microgravity plant growth processes with newly-developed technologies to increase overall efficiency and reliability. 

The ability to cultivate plants for food and oxygen generation aboard the space station is a key step in the planning of longer-duration, deep space missions where frequent resupply missions may not be a possibility.

Watch Launch!

Orbital ATK and United Launch Alliance (ULA) are targeting Tuesday, April 18 for launch of the Cygnus cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station. Liftoff is currently slated for 11 a.m. EST.

Watch live HERE.

You can also watch the launch live in 360! This will be the world’s first live 360-degree stream of a rocket launch. Watch the 360 stream HERE.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

6

     While driving down Interstate 5 through Santa Ana, California, you may have spotted this rocket. Even for space fans, identifying this vehicle may be difficult. It is a rare Delta Cryogenic Second Stage (DCSS) for the short lived Delta III rocket. This DCSS has a home at Discovery Cube Orange County, where she acts as an effective billboard for this educational museum. This equipment is appropriately placed near Huntington Beach where this particular payload fairing was manufactured.

     On August 27, 1998, the Delta 259 mission lifted off from Launch Complex 17B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, marking the first flight of a Delta III, carrying the Galaxy 10 communication satellite. During the burn of its first stage, a design flaw in the rocket’s guidance system caused it to violently diverge from its planned trajectory and begin to break up. During the breakup process, the flight termination system was activated by the range safety officer, causing what was left of the rocket to explode. The Galaxy 10 satellite could be seen that night as a flaming ball streaking down until it spectacularly exploded as it hit the Atlantic Ocean. 

     The second flight of a Delta III would take place on May 5, 1999, as the Delta 269 mission flew from the same pad. Thanks to a manufacturing flaw in the Pratt & Whitney RL10B-2 engine, the second stage burn was cut short, causing the stage to tumble into a useless orbit. The Orion 3 communication satellite was written off and a second payload was lost.

     A final flight of the Delta III would take place on August 23, 2000, with the Delta 280 mission, which carried a dummy payload called DM-F3. This time, the flight was a success, but it was too late for the Delta III. The commercial satellite industry took a steep dive in the late 1990s. The more powerful Delta IV was just a few years away from its first flight, and Boeing was pursuing a more conservative Delta II Heavy rocket. These factors, combined with the failures, caused the Delta III to be quietly shelved. Some spare parts from the program were flown on various Delta II and Delta IV flights, and in the late 2000s, Boeing donated this DCSS to Discovery Cube Orange County where it stands today, greeting passersby on Interstate 5.

Imagine babysitting Groot with Peter...

Originally posted by nicolasprenger

Warnings: way too cute for human consumption, probably language

A/N: This was a request by @grootiez. I hope you like it because I loved it. Definitely spurred more Groot ideas.

Tags: @bitch-m-fabulous , @thecupcakeconsumer, @courtneychicken

You sat reading aloud next to the tiny planted Groot. He had been growing well since sacrificing himself and you hoped he would talk soon. You never met full sized Groot but between the stories and how much time you spent sitting with Baby Groot, you were pretty sure you would have loved him. The group was supposed to be going into the city on the planet you just landed so that they could collect some general supplies and maybe intel. You hated going outside so you opted out and just gave Rocket a brief list in exchange for you staying with Groot.ย 

Keep reading

7

Electron soars on inaugural test flight, paving way for commercial operations.

Rocket Lab broke through the smallsat launch industry Thursday (May 25) with the first launch of its Electron rocket. Dubbed “It’s a Test” by the U.S.-based company, Electron carried a sensor package in lieu of satellites for this mission, providing engineers with over 25,000 channels of data.

Nine Rutherford engines – made in-house by Rocket Lab – powered the 56-foot rocket off its seaside launch complex on New Zealand’s Mahia peninsula. Launch Complex-1 is the country’s first orbital launch facility. Liftoff occurred at 4:20 UTC, or 12:20am EDT May 25.

Two and a half minutes after liftoff the rocket’s first stage fell away and a single Rutherford engine on the upper stage ignited. The vehicle’s payload fairing jettisoned as the second stage continued its powered climb to orbit.

Although the vehicle did reach space – defined as 62 miles above the Earth’s surface – Rocket Lab indicated after the flight that Electron did not achieve orbital velocity. The company did not go into detail on what the potential issues with the flight were that caused its sensor package to not achieve orbit.

Rocket Lab’s Launch Complex-1, located on Mahia Point, New Zealand. Orbital imagery courtesy Digital Globe.

Electron is one of only a handful of rocket’s designed entirely in the 21st century. As such, it features a plethora of unique technologies that make it stand out against other vehicles in the commercial launch market. Each Rutherford engine is 3D printed and is fed by all-electric pumps, earning the nickname “the battery-powered rocket”. The use of composite materials for the entire rocket’s body has never been done before and gives Electron a sleek black appearance.

Electron is the first rocket in a burgeoning class of small launchers to take flight that will cater to the small satellite market. Vector Space Systems recently completed a subscale, single-engine test launch of their Vector-R vehicle, however, full-scale test flights still need to occur.

Rocket Labs hopes to fly two more test flights in the coming months before Electron is declared operational by the end of 2017.

Click here for our preview story on Electron’s flight.

P/c: Rocket Lab

SpaceX just successfully landed the Falcon 9 rocket — to launch a government spy satellite

  • At 7:15 a.m. Eastern on Monday, SpaceX successfully launched a brand-new Falcon 9 rocket from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, marking the vehicle’s fourth successful landing on solid ground, USA Today reported.
  • The 230-foot rocket’s first stage — the 14-story high core containing main engines and majority of the fuel — re-entered Earth’s atmosphere and touched ground on a landing pad a few miles from the launch site.
  • While the launch was SpaceX’s 34th mission, it was the first assignment executed for the U.S. military — SpaceX received certification to launch satellites for the Air Force back in 2015.
  • The national security mission launched a spy satellite dubbed NROL-76 for the U.S. Department of Defense’s National Reconnaissance Office.
  • Due to the nature of the launch, neither the purpose of the mission nor the length of the satellite’s orbit or final destination have been disclosed.
  • Even the live broadcast of the launch had an air of mystery, showing just a handful of shots of the rocket’s initial descent rather than continuous footage, according to the Verge. Read more (5/1/17)

follow @the-future-now

Stages of Rocketshipping

Look at these dorky villains.

They must be really good friends. Look how cute they are.

Holy Matrimony. WHAT HAPPENED IN THAT BALLOON?! OMG!

Training Daze? OMG! KISS! Damn it Meowth!

What are you doing, James??

And they’re in the hot spring together, NAKED?!

THEY JUST PROMISED TO MEET IN THE AFTERLIFE OMG!

So when are they getting married/having babies, writers? Hmmmm?!

Eighty-Four Years Later

instagram

Falcon 9 landing on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship after delivering SES-10 into orbit.

4

SpaceX completes first classified mission lofting NROL-76 to orbit.

Breaking a monopoly previously held by the United Launch Alliance, SpaceX successfully launched a classified national security payload into orbit Monday morning, May 1. 

Launching from LC-39A at 7:15am EDT, the Falcon 9 rocket flew downrange into the rising sun to deliver its clandestine payload. Excellent weather conditions gave tracking cameras excellent visibility of the vehicle, and the rocket’s stage separation and boostback burn were seen in detail for the first time.

Eight minutes after launch the rocket’s first stage landed at LZ-1, the fourth landing at Cape Canaveral and the tenth recovered booster overall. Elon Musk tweeted shortly after landing that the NROL-76 satellite was successfully launched, indicating nominal performance of the second stage. 

Liftoff was originally scheduled for April 30 but a faulty Liquid Oxygen temperature sensor on the first stage forced launch controllers to delay the mission by 24 hours.

Watch a replay of the launch here or below:

P/C: SpaceX

When people have their biases and prejudices, yes, I am aware. My head is not in the sand. But my thing is, if I can’t work with you, I will work around you. I was not about to be [so] discouraged that I’d walk away. That may be a solution for some people, but it’s not mine.
— 

Annie J. Easley

Annie J. Easley (April 23, 1933 – June 25, 2011) was an African-American computer scientist, mathematician, and rocket scientist.

She worked for the Lewis Research Center (now Glenn Research Center) of NASA and its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA).

She was a leading member of the team which developed software for the Centaur rocket stage and one of the first African-Americans to work as a computer scientist at NASA.

Cover of Science and Engineering Newsletter featuring Easley at the Lewis Research Center. Image source: NASA
 

8

SPRA line thrower

Designed by Alfred James Schermuly and produced during the 1920′s as the Schermuly Pistol Rocket Apparatus.
1 ¾" caliber muzzle fitted over a 1″/26,5mm pistol section.

The SPRA was used by sailors to throw lines of rope to runaway boats or overboard crew. It used a two-stage rocket propelled by a blank cartridge, giving it its proper course, and an internal charge to fly it the rest of the way.

three Schermuly rockets

These guns were conversion of the ubiquitous ‘Very’ flare guns manufactured by Webley, in these cases the MkV and MkIII variants.

a Webley and Scott N°1 MkV flare pistol

youtube

4K @ 60Hz, enough said

2

Classified payload set for launch on first NRO SpaceX flight.

SpaceX is making final preparations for theSunday morning liftoff of the NROL-76 satellite, the first time the private space company will launch a national security mission. Little information is known about the payload given the classified nature of the NRO’s activities in Earth orbit.

Liftoff is scheduled between 7 and 9 am EDT from LC-39A at Kennedy Space Center. Eight minutes after liftoff, the rocket’s first stage will land at LZ-1 at Cape Canaveral.

A static fire of the Falcon 9′s first stage engines occurred on Tuesday afternoon, April 25. The secretive payload, already encapsulated within the rocket’s payload fairing, was moved from its secured processing facility on Cape Canaveral to the Horizontal Integration Facility at LC-39A early Friday afternoon, April 28.

SpaceX will host a webcast of the launch beginning 20 minutes before T-0. However, due to the classified nature of the payload, the webcast will end following Main Engine Cutoff and will focus solely on the first stage’s return to Earth.

Below, the official SpaceX and NRO logos for the NROL-76 mission.

P/C: NRO/SpaceX.