rock n roll interview

anonymous asked:

Hi! Why do you think harry chose pink for his album? I don't think it's because "its rock&roll color" is it? In the french interview he said it MEANS something to him but hmm.... do you have any idea ?

I do have an idea. My answer involves a lot of speculation, so take it with a giant grain of salt. My quotes on the Quotidien interview is taken from this transcript. The video is here.

Stepping back a bit, I do feel conflicted about speculating on a question like this. As the interviewer said, millions of people (including me) dissect Harry’s every tic under a microscope. I don’t think I could be 100% consistent under that kind of scrutiny. Yes, he is a celebrity– and the promotion of his creative work inevitably involves revealing something of his personal life, so that his audience can feel more connected to him. Allowing access to stalkers is part of this strategy– to make him seem reachable, intimate, yet iconic and larger-than-life. They are loathsome and invasive. But they are also useful.

We’ve all been discussing the Harry Styles™ mystique: Harry’s quality of never being completely known or understood, his way of saying nothing while saying something and vice versa, his desire to separate his professional from his private life. This is why audiences are obsessed with whether he “presses the Instagram button with his own finger.” We want to eliminate a layer of uncertainty in the speculation, to know that we’re one circle closer to the real Harry Styles. 

He’s mentioned that Sign of the Times has a personal meaning to him, but explains its meaning in vague, general terms. The lyrics, while seemingly personal and urgent, are not specific to a circumstance. We circle and hover, but never get closer. 

What about Cameron Crowe’s Rolling Stone article, stating in no uncertain terms that the album is “ten songs” about “women and relationships”? Here’s what Harry says

  • I: You said to the Rolling Stone magazine that most of the album was inspired by a woman. Really?
  • H: No I think, honestly, the album is much more about me than it is about anyone else. I think if I said the album is about a woman it kind of feels like, I don’t know, I put a lot of work into this. I don’t feel like it involves around woman. It’s a lot about me and things I’ve never said before. It’s more about me.

It’s not about a woman. His first word is, “No.” Then he softens his statement by redirecting it to himself (personal life), then his hard work (professional life), things he’s never said before (a mixture of the two). In a Harry way, he circles the question back on itself– my music is about both me and my music. It’s a statement about nothing. But in saying that, it answers something– it’s not about women. 

So let’s see what he says about the color pink:

Keep reading

(…) This is music, this is art. It’s definitely a good business, but that should be second to the art, not first. (…)

I like being successful. I was always starving. On the other side. When it came to people with money, it was always “The rich? Fuck them!” But I left one group and joined another. I escaped from one group where I was looked down on for being a poor kid that doesn’t know shit, and now I’m, like, a rich, successful asshole. I don’t like that. I’m still just me and, with a lot of people’s help, the group was able to become a huge financial success.

—  Axl Rose interview - RS magazine

The Man And The Mistakes That ‘Invented Rock 'n’ Roll’

Sam Phillips, founder of the label Sun Records, didn’t care much about making flawless recordings. Instead, the man who discovered Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, Howlin’ Wolf, Charlie Rich, Roy Orbison and a host of others rejected perfection in favor of spontaneity and individuality.

“Sam would say, 'I hate that word, perfection. It should be banned from the English language,’” music writer Peter Guralnick tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. “He didn’t care about the mistakes; he cared about the feel.”

In his new book, Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n’ Roll, Guralnick chronicles Phillips’ work at Sun and his lasting impact on the music industry.


Photo: Courtesy of Tom Salva/Little Brown & Co

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Jimmy Page: How Stairway to Heaven was written - BBC News

“I remember, the first day at school there was this big fucking commotion. I heard all these books hit the ground, yelling, and then he went running past. A bunch of fucking teachers chasing him down the hallway… I thought, well, here’s a guy who’s completely crazy, he’d be a fucking great singer. We had to coax him a bit [and] it didn’t go so well in the early days. Sometimes he would just come over and stand around, like he was embarrassed. Or he’d start to sing and then he’d just leave. Walk out and I wouldn’t see him again for like three days! Some things don’t change, huh?”

- Izzy Stradlin talking about Axl, 2001.