rochowski

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Recent commercial interior projects:

Shooting with the design community means that my work moves between the studio and on location. We create these images for editorial, advertising/marketing and portfolio uses.

Over the past months I’ve built relationships with many wonderful new clients and had the opportunity to capture their finest work. It’s a great privilege.

The next year will reveal lots more of these collaborations.

Check the updated interiors section on the website now!

Frank Gehry's wooden Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in 2008 was "hugely hefty"

Movie: Frank Gehry’s chunky wooden pavilion from 2008 is the subject of our next exclusive video with Serpentine Gallery director Julia Peyton-Jones.

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Photograph by John Offenbach

Frank Gehry’s 2008 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion consisted of four wood-clad steel columns, which supported a series of large timber planks and beams.

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Photograph by John Offenbach

“Frank Gehry’s pavilion was wonderful,” says Peyton-Jones in the movie. “It was made from really hefty bits of wood – hugely hefty bits of wood.”

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Photograph by John Offenbach

Part-amphitheatre, part-promenade, the pavilion featured terraced seating along two sides of a central avenue that led up to the front of the Serpentine Gallery.

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Photograph by Nick Rochowski

“The project was very grand and very much about the relationship with the Serpentine Gallery,” Peyton-Jones says. “The central avenue framed the gallery.”

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Photograph by Deborah Bullen

Sheets of transparent glass were suspended from the wooden beams to shelter the promenade, which was used for talks and performances.

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Photograph by Deborah Bullen

“Gehry was committed to the performative element of how the pavilion was used,” Peyton-Jones says. “The inaugural concert was by Thomas Adès, the great British composer.”

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Photograph by John Offenbach

In one of the previous movies in our series, Peyton-Jones admits that she wasn’t completely happy with the finishes on the 2002 pavilion by Toyo Ito. But by 2008, she says the quality of the construction of the pavilions had markedly improved.


Related story: Olafur Eliasson and Kjetil Thorsen’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion “looked like a spinning top”


“Frank made a surprise visit,” she recollects. “He walked around it and had no comment to make about the finishes and how we’d built it and that was really important. It was definitely a progression from the early days.”

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Photograph by Nick Rochowski

Despite being one of the world’s most celebrated architects, Gehry has never completed a building in London. Peyton-Jones says that being able to show the work of great architects in the city – albeit temporarily – is a key strength of the pavilion programme.

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Photograph by Nick Rochowski

“This is Frank Gehry, one of the most recognised names in the architecture profession,” she says.


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“It’s quite extraordinary that to this day he has not completed a project in London. I think it underscores that the commission has a role to play in terms of informing and educating the public.”

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Julia Peyton-Jones. Copyright: Dezeen

This movie was filmed by Dezeen at the Serpentine Gallery in London. All images used in the movie and this story are courtesy of Serpentine Galleries.

Dezeen is looking back at each of the gallery’s pavilions from 2000 to 2015 in a series of interviews. You can watch all the movies as we publish them on our YouTube playlist:

The post Frank Gehry’s wooden Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in 2008 was “hugely hefty” appeared first on Dezeen.

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Yin Oi Tong Chinese Medical Hall, George Town, Penang, Malaysia:

I’ve pulled an edit of this up from the archive because I went past this building in December last year while on a trip through my home country of Malaysia and then Vietnam. It’s now been restored and turned into a hotel, restaurant and museum.

I shot it in 2010 as part of a larger project called First Island (something I still haven’t actually fully edited). I was fascinated by the rapid development of Georgetown and the island itself yet there were so many buildings being left to ruin for one reason or another.

The Yin Oi Tong was still operating and it was a great privilege for my wife and I to spend 3 days inside it with the owners. The air was thick with over 200 years of dried medicinal ingredients oozing out of the layered paint work, floor boards and dusty furniture. It was a rabbit warren of artefacts, measuring scales, rice sacks and boxes. The ingredients were dried on the roof and supplies winched up through the shaft. It seemed like it hadn’t changed since the day it opened in 1796, 10 years after Sir Francis Light established a British Colony there. . I love these buildings and the vivid history that jumps out at you right before your eyes.

While we were there local residents and businesses would come in for advise, have a chat and of course lunch…then we would go back upstairs and continue taking pictures.

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I did a lovely shoot for a great new juice blender in Covent Garden called Blend & Press a few months back. Working with Studio 91 in collaboration with Art Director Kajsa Soderlund, we set about creating a couple of vivid graphic images for their in-store displays, menus and bags. Here’s what the studio had to say in their PR for the project:

“This new photographic element to our identity perfectly encapsulates our core offerings and values: sexy and sophisticated juices with a fashionable twist,” says Emma Wood, owner and founder at Blend & Press

Excited by the unique characteristics and colours of the raw ingredients used by Emma at Blend & Press, Nick and Kajsa set out to create a diptych of serene fruit and vegetable “island” sets. Using the natural shapes of these objects paired with cut forms, the ever playful and visually graphic images reveal subtle interactions and reflections between the objects the more the viewer studies.”

I love the design work by Studio 91 here. I’m always excited to to see how imagery and typography work together in editorial inspired layouts like this, it brings back memories of when I studied graphic design at the LCC in E&C.