robert's army

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Native tribe files legal challenge to Dakota Access Pipeline

  • In a last-ditch effort to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, one of the Native American tribes directly affected by construction filed a legal challenge in a federal court on Thursday morning, according to the Associated Press.
  • The legal action follows news that acting Secretary of the Army Robert Speer ordered the United States Army Corps of Engineers to complete the $3.8 billion pipeline, despite mass protests from Native peoples whose land and water could be devastated by its construction. Read more

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US Army Corps ordered to allow the completion of the Dakota Access pipeline

  • The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been ordered to allow the completion of the Dakota Access pipeline, North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven told CNN.
  • In a statement Hoeven said that acting Secretary of the Army Robert Speer had “directed the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed with the easement needed to complete the Dakota Access pipeline,” and that Congressional notification was “imminent”.
  • The Standing Rock Sioux tribe said that as of Wednesday, Hoeven’s statement was premature. Read more
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Trump is already screwing over rural and working-class Americans — just not the ones you think

In a statement Tuesday, Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) announced that the acting Secretary of the Army, Robert Speer, had “directed the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed with the easement needed to complete the Dakota Access pipeline” — an oil project the Standing Rock Sioux tribe has been protesting for months.

The news doesn’t mean the easement has been granted yet. But the Sioux and their allies have promised to fight if it moves forward.

Native Americans are rarely considered part of the “rural working-class,” a term that’s increasingly become a dog whistle for white Middle Americans. But Standing Rock Chairman Dave Archambault II was quick to disavow that notion.

“This [protest against the pipeline] is not only a Native American movement,” Archambault wrote in a letter to Trump on Jan. 25, “it is a movement of the working class and rural whose voices are often quieted at the expense of more powerful neighbors.”

Not only do indigenous people suffer from staggering health, educational and income disparities compared to the general population, they often do so far from mainstream attention. Read more

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U.S. Army Captain Robert Bacon leading a patrol in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1964.

Col. Bobby Bacon, then a captain, was featured on the June 12, 1964 cover of LIFE magazine. The photo, taken by Larry Burrows, shows Bacon leading a group of South Vietnamese soldiers through rice fields in the Mekong Delta. Bacon served two tours of duty in Vietnam. Among his decorations are the Silver Star and the Bronze Star with two valor devices. Bacon was stationed at Fort Jackson from 1976 through 1983.

He graduated West Point with a bachelor’s of science in communications in 1956, and was a classmate of Norman Schwarzkopf. He is now retired and living in Fort Jackson, South Carolina.

©Larry Burrows: Vietnam photos
©Susanne Kappler: Current photo

**The soldier in the 6th photo is not Capt. Robert Bacon. When I find his name, I’ll add it. The source where I found the photos identified him as Capt. Bacon. Thank you for the correction @remythejester!