road paving

the signs as van gogh quotes

aries: “I often think that the night is more alive and more richly colored than the day.”

taurus: “There is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.”

gemini: “Great things are not done by impulse, but by a series of small things brought together.”

cancer: “If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere.”

leo: “Be clearly aware of the stars and infinity on high. Then life seems almost enchanted after all.”

virgo: “I would rather die of passion than of boredom.”

libra: “Normality is a paved road: It’s comfortable to walk, but no flowers grow on it.”

scorpio: “I put my heart and soul into my work, and I have lost my mind in the process.”

sagittarius: “I dream my painting and I paint my dream.”

capricorn: “What would life be if we had no courage to attempt anything?”

aquarius: “Art is to console those who are broken by life.”

pisces: “I don’t know anything with certainty, but seeing the stars makes me dream.”

2

The Transfăgărășan [trans: over, across + Făgăraș (Făgăraș Mountains)] is a paved mountain road crossing the southern section of the Carpathian Mountains of Romania

It starts near the locality of Bascov (Argeş county) and stretches 90 kilometres to the crossroad between the DN1 and the city of Sibiu, between the highest peaks in the country, Moldoveanu and Negoiu.

The Transfăgărășan was constructed between 1970 and 1974, during the rule of Nicolae Ceaușescu, as a response to the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia by the Soviet Union. Ceaușescu wanted to ensure quick military access across the mountains in case of a Soviet invasion. At the time, Romania already had several strategic mountain passes through the Southern Carpathians, whether inherited from the pre-communist era (the DN1 and the high-pass DN67C), or built during the initial years of the Communist regime (the DN66). These passes, however, were mainly through river valleys, and would have been easy for the Soviets to block and attack. Ceauşescu therefore ordered the construction of a road across the Făgăraş Mountains, which divide northwestern and southern Romania.

Built mainly by military forces, the road had a high financial and human cost. Work was carried out in an alpine climate, at an elevation of 2,000 metres (6,600 ft), using roughly six million kilograms (5,900 long tons; 6,600 short tons) of dynamite, and employing junior military personnel who were untrained in blasting techniques. Many workers died; official records state that only 40 soldiers lost their lives, but unofficial estimates by workers put the number in the hundreds.

The road was officially opened on September 20th 1974, although work, particularly paving of the roadbed, continued until 1980.

The road climbs to an altitude of 2,042 metres (6,699 ft), making it the second highest mountain pass in Romania after the Transalpina. It is a winding road, dotted with steep hairpin turns, long S-curves, and sharp descents. It is both an attraction and a challenge for hikers, cyclists, drivers and motorcycle enthusiasts. Due to the topography, the average speed is around 40 km/h (25 mph). The road also provides access to Bâlea Lake and Bâlea Waterfall.

The road is usually closed from late October until late June because of snow. Depending on the weather, it may remain open until as late as November, or may close even in the summer; 

The Transfăgărășan has more tunnels (a total of 5) and viaducts than any other road in Romania. Near the highest point, at Bâlea Lake, the road passes through Bâlea Tunnel, the longest road tunnel in Romania, at 884 m (2,900 ft).

Along the southern section of the road, near the village of Arefu, is Poenari Castle. The castle was the residence of Vlad the Impaler, the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s Count Dracula.

The Transfăgărășan was featured in a segment of the British TV show Top Gear, in the first episode of Series 14 (November 2009). Host Jeremy Clarkson proclaimed that the Transfăgărășan was “the best road in the world,” a title the presenters had previously given to the Stelvio Pass in Italy.

We have moments where we can’t get enough of each other.
We have moments where we get annoyed.
We’ve had moments that have broken us.
We’ve had a moment where we thought “this was it”
But we came out of it,
Stronger than ever.
Id rather have had a bumpy road with him.
Then have a paved road with anyone else
—  Chapters from my life

SURPRISE its not what I said I’d deliver which is still in the works, but here have this:

Just Dating Ravus Nox Fleuret things:

  • Ah, your dear Ravus is very complicated. Very complicated and not at all a bad man. He has made mistakes; acted in desperation to try and take control of a situation that he’s forced into with the Empire and has done bad things to try and keep his sister safe. The road to hell is paved with good intentions and Ravus has only tried to do good things. Beneath his brooding exterior he is fiercely loyal and very much a proud prince. He is not a bad man. Proof of that is the fact that you are by his side. You remind him every day that good things are not beyond his reach; you are his beautiful silver lining.

Keep reading

washingtonpost.com
Democrats reject her, but they helped pave the road to education nominee DeVos
Many Democrats have been supporting traditional Republican views of school reform for years.

It wasn’t all that long ago that it would have seemed impossible for anybody who labeled the U.S. public education system a “dead end” to be nominated as U.S. Secretary of Education, much less get support to be confirmed. Not anymore. Betsy DeVos, a Republican billionaire from Michigan who public school advocates see as hostile to America’s public education system, is likely to be confirmed despite a rocky Senate committee hearing, where, under caustic Democratic questioning, she seemed not to know basic education issues.

If DeVos does become education secretary, Democrats will of course blame the Republicans. DeVos is, after all, a Republican who has donated millions of dollars to Republicans, was selected to be education secretary by a Republican, and would win confirmation thanks to the Republican majority in the Senate.

But the record shows that Democrats can’t just blame Republicans for her ascension. It was actually Democrats who helped pave the road for DeVos to take the helm of the Education Department. Democrats have in recent years sounded — and acted — a lot like Republicans in advancing corporate education reform, which seeks to operate public schools as if they were businesses, not civic institutions. (This dynamic isn’t limited to education, but this post is.) By embracing many of the tenets of corporate reform — including the notion of “school choice” and the targeting of teachers and their unions as being blind to the needs of children — they helped make DeVos’s education views, once seen as extreme, seem less so. Historically, Democrats and Republicans have looked at public schools differently.

Democrats have traditionally been defenders of public education, seeing it as the nation’s most important civic institution, one that is meant to provide equal opportunity for marginalized communities to escape poverty and become well-informed citizens so they can become part of America’s civic life. Public education was seen as a civil right. Republicans have looked at public schools less as vehicles of social equity and more as places that are supposed to prepare young people for college and careers, an endeavor that should be measured with the same types of metrics businesses use to gauge success. Some Republicans have looked at public schools with suspicion, in some cases seeing them as transmitters of liberal and even godless values.

That’s why it was unusual when, in 2001, the late Sen. Edward Kennedy, the liberal Massachusetts Democrat, gave critical support to the new conservative Republican president, George W. Bush, in passing a new education law called No Child Left Behind (NCLB). A bipartisan, they said, was to make sure public schools attended to the needs of all students, but the law actually became known for creating new “accountability” measures for schools based on controversial standardized test scores.

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