road cross

flickr

Summer shower, London by johndouglassgoring2
Via Flickr:
Charing Cross road _FEX3823.jpg

Later…

“Okay, Kendra,” I sighed. “Remember Mom and Dad’s rules. Don’t wander into town on your own, but if you need to cross a road for whatever reason, look both ways! Also, call either them or me if you need picking up afterwards.”

“Sure, Pippa,” Kendra rolled her eyes. “Can you take me inside to find them? Your eyesight is better than mine, plus you’re taller.”

the run, meh; the event, terrific

thursday

the road to new york

A nice 9 mile recovery run in the park and around town with the earphones and music on, rarely listen to music in runs but wanted it today.  The run was recovery after last might’s 5k…

Last night’s Ronald McDonald House 5k went ok, finishing in 17:19, a slightly disappointing time but 4th overall, 2nd masters finisher.  I like the course and would like to have gone faster, but had a stomach thing all day, might have eaten something bad the day before, was feeling lousy all day race day…so considering everything, the race went as well as it could have…

But aside from that, it was great running it with my son as we normally do, and was great fun afterwards as it usually is with this race and it’s post-race party.  Good times with great friends and great locally brewed beer, with great food provided by the Ronald McDonald House.  

Quickly forgot about the less than thrilling race performance and remembered why we run…

Family Mattters

For @timeneverforgets for being Marcelina’s biggest fan.

-

Tanya tried really hard not to interfere. Kids went to the park everyday and were perfectly fine, even if their parents didn’t come with them.

But the girl wasn’t playing. She was just sitting at the edge of the park, looking around. She looked like she was lost and it was getting dark outside.

Tanya finally gave up and crossed the road. She sat next to the little girl. “You okay?”

She looked up, startled. “No.”

“What’s your name?” Tanya wasn’t good at the younger kids thing. She was the youngest of three and was three years younger than her whole year.

“It’s Cela,” the girl replied. It was a strange name but based off her accent she wasn’t English. Her soft accent reminded Tanya of Matteusz, so maybe she was Polish. He had mentioned there was a few families from Poland in the area.

“I’m Tanya. I’m here to help you.”

“I’m not lost,” Cela said. “I know where my house is. It’s half a street away.”

“I thought you were lost - you look like you’d rather be at home.”

“I’ve lost someone.” Cela hugged her knees. She was wearing white tights with dungarees shorts on top. She didn’t even have on a coat. “And it’s the same feeling.”

Tanya thought back to her Dad’s ghost that came back though the Lan Kin last week. “Who have you lost? Did they die?”

“I don’t know!” Cela dropped her head into her lap. “I left to go play with my friends and come back to a missing brother. The sky was so weird too and I don’t remember going to sleep.”

The Lan Kin. Just thinking about it made her skin crawl. “I saw the sky. It was scary.”

“You remember?” Cela asked. “Most people act like the weird things don’t happen. I think it’s an English thing.” Charlie had said the same thing (about humans). Tanya did have to admit it was weird to act like the world didn’t almost end on a weekly basis.

“I remember. Did you see anyone?” Maybe she wasn’t the only one who had seen a ghost that night.

“No!” Cela collapsed into a little ball again. “That’s the problem. That’s when he went missing! It’s not fair!”

Tanya wondered if Cela’s missing person had become another victim of the Lan Kin. Then she shook her head, trying to ignore the awful thought. Fighting aliens had made her too cynical.

“Who went missing?”

“My brother!” Cela wailed and then wiped her eyes again, which were starting to turn red and puffy. “I left to avoid the fighting and came back to a half-empty home. I thought he died.”

Tanya couldn’t help but think of her own brothers. She’d be in a similar state if Jarvis or Damon went missing, especially after an alien attack.

“Yet, somehow it’s worse!” Cela threw her arms up dramatically. “They chose this! They wanted him gone. They didn’t even give us a chance to say goodbye. Matti is my brother!”

“Hey, hey,” Tanya said, awkwardly patting her back. She really wasn’t good with little kids. Cela continued to cry. “Maybe they’ll change their mind.”

“It’s too late.” Cela looked up at her with tearful eyes. It really hit Tanya how young she was - seven or eight st most. “He’s gone. They don’t know where. The school called up and told my Mummy that Matti’s address and emergency contact number has been changed. And that apparently one of his teachers said they were banned from seeing him ever.”

“What about you Cela?”

“I don’t know,” she said between ugly sobs, “I keep waiting but he hasn’t come back. I don’t think Matti ever will. I won’t.”

Tanya didn’t know what to say but she tried. Someone had to comfort this little girl. “Try writing him a letter?” She suggested.

Cela started at her. “A letter? I don’t have his new address.”

“You don’t need to send it straight away. After my Dad died,” she had to take a breath, “um, I wrote him letters. Just to let it out. Sometimes easier when you don’t talk about or you can’t. I find that writing it down can help. It’s like talking to them.”

“And then I can mail them when I find out Charlie’s address!” Cela’s eyes lit up.

Tanya frowned: Charlie? And her brother was called Matti. A nickname for her older brother. Or for Tanya’s own friend, who was recently kicked out.

Matteusz had never mentioned having a younger sister. He had never mentioned his family at all. Maybe she was his sister.

Tanya could see the resemblance. Cela was much shorter but they had the same dark hair and eyes. Plus they had a similar accent.

It started to rain. “You should head home, Cela.” Tanya decided not to mention the fact she knew her brother. If Matteusz hadn’t mentioned his sister, it was probably for a reason. She’d talk to him first. Besides, Cela needed to rest and Tanya wasn’t sure her emotions could take the news.

“Or my parents will worry?” She stood up but kicked the damp pavement. “They deserve the worrying.”

“Or you’ll get a cold. And don’t you want to get started on a letter?”

Cela nodded. “Goodbye Tanya. Thank you.” She looked both ways (smart girl, she could see the family resemblance) and crossed the road. She walked off, pulling her cardigan tight. It was only after she vanished that it occurred to Tanya to follow her. It was London at night and she was only young.

Too young.

Tanya pulled her own coat closer. She hadn’t realised how terrible Matteusz family was. More specifically his parents.

She wondered if Matteusz would ever receive his letters; she hoped he would. The universe owed him some kindness.

Family Mattters

For @timeneverforgets for being Marcelina’s biggest fan.

-

Tanya tried really hard not to interfere. Kids went to the park everyday and were perfectly fine, even if their parents didn’t come with them.

But the girl wasn’t playing. She was just sitting at the edge of the park, looking around. She looked like she was lost and it was getting dark outside.

Tanya finally gave up and crossed the road. She sat next to the little girl. “You okay?”

She looked up, startled. “No.”

“What’s your name?” Tanya wasn’t good at the younger kids thing. She was the youngest of three and was three years younger than her whole year.

“It’s Cela,” the girl replied. It was a strange name but based off her accent she wasn’t English. Her soft accent reminded Tanya of Matteusz, so maybe she was Polish. He had mentioned there was a few families from Poland in the area.

“I’m Tanya. I’m here to help you.”

“I’m not lost,” Cela said. “I know where my house is. It’s half a street away.”

“I thought you were lost - you look like you’d rather be at home.”

“I’ve lost someone.” Cela hugged her knees. She was wearing white tights with dungarees shorts on top. She didn’t even have on a coat. “And it’s the same feeling.”

Tanya thought back to her Dad’s ghost that came back though the Lan Kin last week. “Who have you lost? Did they die?”

“I don’t know!” Cela dropped her head into her lap. “I left to go play with my friends and come back to a missing brother. The sky was so weird too and I don’t remember going to sleep.”

The Lan Kin. Just thinking about it made her skin crawl. “I saw the sky. It was scary.”

“You remember?” Cela asked. “Most people act like the weird things don’t happen. I think it’s an English thing.” Charlie had said the same thing (about humans). Tanya did have to admit it was weird to act like the world didn’t almost end on a weekly basis.

“I remember. Did you see anyone?” Maybe she wasn’t the only one who had seen a ghost that night.

“No!” Cela collapsed into a little ball again. “That’s the problem. That’s when he went missing! It’s not fair!”

Tanya wondered if Cela’s missing person had become another victim of the Lan Kin. Then she shook her head, trying to ignore the awful thought. Fighting aliens had made her too cynical.

“Who went missing?”

“My brother!” Cela wailed and then wiped her eyes again, which were starting to turn red and puffy. “I left to avoid the fighting and came back to a half-empty home. I thought he died.”

Tanya couldn’t help but think of her own brothers. She’d be in a similar state if Jarvis or Damon went missing, especially after an alien attack.

“Yet, somehow it’s worse!” Cela threw her arms up dramatically. “They chose this! They wanted him gone. They didn’t even give us a chance to say goodbye. Matti is my brother!”

“Hey, hey,” Tanya said, awkwardly patting her back. She really wasn’t good with little kids. Cela continued to cry. “Maybe they’ll change their mind.”

“It’s too late.” Cela looked up at her with tearful eyes. It really hit Tanya how young she was - seven or eight st most. “He’s gone. They don’t know where. The school called up and told my Mummy that Matti’s address and emergency contact number has been changed. And that apparently one of his teachers said they were banned from seeing him ever.”

“What about you Cela?”

“I don’t know,” she said between ugly sobs, “I keep waiting but he hasn’t come back. I don’t think Matti ever will. I won’t.”

Tanya didn’t know what to say but she tried. Someone had to comfort this little girl. “Try writing him a letter?” She suggested.

Cela started at her. “A letter? I don’t have his new address.”

“You don’t need to send it straight away. After my Dad died,” she had to take a breath, “um, I wrote him letters. Just to let it out. Sometimes easier when you don’t talk about or you can’t. I find that writing it down can help. It’s like talking to them.”

“And then I can mail them when I find out Charlie’s address!” Cela’s eyes lit up.

Tanya frowned: Charlie? And her brother was called Matti. A nickname for her older brother. Or for Tanya’s own friend, who was recently kicked out.

Matteusz had never mentioned having a younger sister. He had never mentioned his family at all. Maybe she was his sister.

Tanya could see the resemblance. Cela was much shorter but they had the same dark hair and eyes. Plus they had a similar accent.

It started to rain. “You should head home, Cela.” Tanya decided not to mention the fact she knew her brother. If Matteusz hadn’t mentioned his sister, it was probably for a reason. She’d talk to him first. Besides, Cela needed to rest and Tanya wasn’t sure her emotions could take the news.

“Or my parents will worry?” She stood up but kicked the damp pavement. “They deserve the worrying.”

“Or you’ll get a cold. And don’t you want to get started on a letter?”

Cela nodded. “Goodbye Tanya. Thank you.” She looked both ways (smart girl, she could see the family resemblance) and crossed the road. She walked off, pulling her cardigan tight. It was only after she vanished that it occurred to Tanya to follow her. It was London at night and she was only young.

Too young.

Tanya pulled her own coat closer. She hadn’t realised how terrible Matteusz family was. More specifically his parents.

She wondered if Matteusz would ever receive his letters; she hoped he would. The universe owed him some kindness.