risk and reward

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Here’s some of the most amazing and invaluable advice you’ll most-likely ever get from one of my good colleagues and legends in comics/gaming, creator JOE MADUREIRA. It’s what i’ve been preaching to you aspiring artists since i arrived on DA, but i think his POV says it perfectly:

*WARNING: SOME MATURE LANGUAGE*

“DO YOU REALLY WANT TO BE A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST? 


Or a successful WORKING PROFESSIONAL?



Believe it or not there is a difference. I’m not usually a soapbox type guy, I don’t like instructing people, and I think I’m a terrible teacher. But hey, it’s Friday and I’m in a strange mood. So here goes:

I’ve noticed that a good number of my fans happen to be aspiring artists themselves. This is for all you guys. I get asked constantly: "Where should I go to school?” “What classes should I take?” “What should I study for anatomy?” “What pencils and paper do you use?” “Should I be working digitally now instead of traditionally?” “How do I fix my poses? Learn composition? Perspective?” “When am I going to develop my own style?” “Who were your influences?” “Teach me how to draw hands!” The list goes on…

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Here’s the deal. All of that stuff *is* important, and it may nudge you in the right direction. A lot of it you will discover for yourself. What works best for one person doesn’t work for another. That’s the beauty of art. It’s personal. It’s discovery. DON’T WORRY ABOUT ALL THAT CRAP!

Instead I’m going to answer the questions that you *SHOULD* be asking, but aren’t. These are things that have only recently occurred to me, after doing this for 20+ years. These things seem so obvious, but apparently they elude a lot of people, because I am surprised at how many ridiculously talented artists are ‘failing’ professionally. Or just unhappy. The beauty of what I’m about to tell you is that it doesn’t matter what field you’re in or what your art style is.

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In no particular order:


1) DO WHAT YOU LOVE. If you are passionate about what you’re doing, it shows. If you’re having fun, it shows. If you’re bored, IT SHOWS. Some guys are able to work on stuff they have zero interest in, and still pull off great work, but I find that when I do this my motivation takes a huge hit. And Motivation is key. Money is not a great motivator. It’s temporary like everything else. And honestly, I’ve gotten paid the most money for some of the shittiest work I have ever done. That may sound awesome, but it’s not. And here’s why…

2) You MUST stay Excited and Motivated. Have you noticed that there are days you can’t draw a god damned thing? And some days you feel like you can draw anything? It’s 4am but you don’t notice because you are in the ZONE. Your hand is racing ahead of your mind and you can do no wrong?! Maybe it’s some new paper you got. Or a new program you’ve been wanting to try out. Or you just found some amazing shit on DeviantArt, or watched some movie that just makes you want to run straight to your board. This relates to the above because while it is possible to involve yourself in projects you aren’t excited about—maybe you need the cash, or think it will look good on your resume, whatever it is—it’s not going to last. You need to stay fresh. Expose yourself to new things. New techniques. You should be getting tired of your own shit on a fairly regular basis. Otherwise other people will.

3) Check your Ego. If you think you’re the shit, you’re already doomed. You may be really, really good at what you do, but there’s someone better. Sorry. There’s always plenty to learn, even for us old dogs. So when I meet young upstarts who have this sense of entitlement, or a know-it-all attitude, I just have to laugh. Some of the biggest egos I’ve ever witnessed were from people who have accomplished the least. Meanwhile, most guys who are supremely talented AND successful, and have EARNED the RIGHT to have an ego and throw their weight around, don’t. Why is that? It’s because…

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4) RELATIONSHIPS ARE IMPORTANT. This may be one of the biggest lessons I’ve had to learn. Early on, I didn’t value my relationships with people. Creatively or otherwise. I felt like I didn’t need anyone’s help and I could figure everything out on my own. Let’s face it, many of us become artists because we are reclusive, social misfits. We’d rather stay inside and draw shit than go outside and play. We like to live inside our own minds. Why not?! It’s awesome in there! And sometimes we don’t want to let other people in. But like I said—you can’t do it alone. I can honestly say that as much as I try to stay current, as much as I try to push my work and draw kick ass shit that will excite people, I would not be where I am today if it weren’t for all the other people I’ve met and learned from along the way. Guys who pulled strings for me. Took risks on me. Believed I was the right guy for the job. You need to manage your relationships. You need to network, and meet people. Drawing comics is still a pretty good place for reclusive types—but if you want to work in big studios—Making games, Films, animation, basically any other type of job on the planet, you’d better start making some connections. Be likeable. Be professional. That doesn’t mean be an opportunistic ladder climber. Fake people lose in the end. Be yourself, but be professional. It’s no secret that when people are hiring, our first instinct is to bring in people we know. It’s human nature. I don’t like unknowns, even if their portfolio is awesome. If we have a mutual connection, if they have great things to say about you, you’re in. If you have AMAZING artwork to show, and I call your last employer and they tell me what a pain in the ass you are to work with, you’re done. Talent and skill only get you so far. I am literally amazed at how often I meet guys that are total assholes and think they are going to get anywhere.

5) Here’s the BIG ONE. The greatest obstacle you will ever have to overcome IS YOURSELF. And the Fear that you are creating in your own head. Stay positive. Stop defeating yourself. There are artists I know that are so damn good they make me pee my pants. I look up to these mofos. I study their shit and I want to draw like them. And they are almost NEVER working on their DREAM project. And—big surprise, they aren’t happy in their job. “Why NOT?! WTF is WRONG WITH YOU?!” is usually my reaction. And the answer is almost always “The market isn’t great right now” “Other stories/games/comics like mine don’t do very well” “The shit that’s hot right now is nothing like mine, It’s just going to fail.” “I’m not sure I’m good enough.” “I need the money.” “Too Risky.” “I tried it before and failed. ” It doesn’t matter what words they use, they are afraid for one reason or another. I know. I’ve been there.

But here’s the deal. YOU NEED TO TAKE RISKS. Guess what? YOU ARE MOST LIKELY GOING TO FAIL. If you want it—REALLY want it, that won’t stop you. You will learn A LOT. My good friend Tim constantly jokes about how I jump out of planes without a parachute and worry about the landing on the way down. You may think that I’m lucky, that it’s easy for me to say because I’m already successful, that I’m in a different situation than you all are. But it’s not true. Risk is risk, no matter what level you’re at. If you’re already successful, you just take even bigger risks. But they never go away. Everything in life is Risk vs. Reward. Not just in your career. LIFE. You’d better get used to it.

I didn’t know what the hell I was doing when I got into comics. I left the #1 selling book at the time ( Uncanny X-men ) to work on Battle Chasers during a time when 'Conan’ was about the only fantasy comic people knew. And no one was buying it. I wanted to work in games, so I started a game company. I had NO IDEA WTF I was doing. I just wanted it, really bad. We tanked. It failed. No big surprise. But the people I worked with got hired elsewhere and rehired me. I started ANOTHER game Company. We had 4 people and a dream, and some publishers wouldn’t even meet with us, because their 'next gen console’ teams had 90+ people on them. I literally got hung up on. “Stick to handheld games, it’s smaller, maybe you can handle that…” one MAJOR publisher told us. I don’t blame them. But we didn’t let it stop us. Thank god we didn’t listen to them. Vigil was born. Darksiders happened, AND we got to make a sequel. It stands shoulder to shoulder with the best games in the industry, and the most elite and experienced game dev studios in the world. How is that possible?!!! Hardly any of us had even worked on a console game before. I’ll be honest, I was thinking we would fail the whole time. I just didn’t care. If I had to play the odds on this one, I’d bet against us.

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Why am I telling you all this shit? This is not me patting myself on the back. It’s just stuff that has somehow only dawned on me recently when it’s been staring me in the face for so long. I feel like I need to wake you guys up!!! I’ve been limiting myself. I’ve gotten afraid. I’ve taken less risks. I saw my career going places I didn’t want to go. I wasn’t happy and I wasn’t excited. And I’ve realized, that all that stuff I just talked about is the reason I am where I am today. Not because I have a manga style, or I draw cool hands, or there’s energy in my drawings, or all the other things people rattle off to me. There are other guys that do all that same shit, and do it better. And amazingly, those same guys constantly tell me “Man, I wish I could do what you are doing.” “SO DO IT!!!!!” PLEASE listen to me—because I want you guys to make it. I want to look to one of you people for inspiration some day when it’s 2am and I need to keep drawing. Stop worrying about all the other stuff—the pencils, the paper, the anatomy, all that shit. It will only get you so far. You’ve already got most of what you need. I hope this helps some people. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all the support over the years. You are all one of the greatest motivating forces in my life and my career. Sappy but true. Ok, let’s go draw some shit!!!“

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  • me: texting him first is too desperate. in this age, a modern woman needs to be independent. i am a strong and busy lady. i will restrain myself, and keep myself an enigma.
  • me five seconds later: life is too short to not live your passions fully. i'm going to text first; i free myself from society's restrains. without risk there is no reward,
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FAVORITE THINGS: victor von doom doing a mental risk/reward analysis like “you know what? when this girl was fourteen she covered me in squirrels. have i rodent-proofed my shit since then? yes. am i in the mood to get covered in fucking squirrels again? literally never. god knows what new powers she’s found since puberty. let the little devil-imp take the goddamn time machine. fuck it. who cares. she’ll probably just end up using it to go back in time and tell herself to never come here. that’s how 90% of all time travel ends. another 5% ends with me as undisputed ruler of the entire earth. i’m not even giving her the good time machine. it’s the janky one. joke’s on her, the a/c doesn’t even work and the tapedeck is broken. doom, as ever, is the real winner here.”

How to Flirt with a Queen like Jon Snow -Finale Update 

Step 1) Challenge her: Whatever you do, don’t bend the knee. Be defiant & irrational as hell! 

Step 2) Casually drop BDSM subtext into conversation

Step 3) Be Mysterious : Just when your wingmam builds up your backstory, stop him as he is about to disclose the most intriguing information about you. A little something for her to think about when you’re not around.

Step 4) Casually throw in your man-pain into the mix during casual chit chat as you brood and sombrely stare in the distance. Sun setting over the sea in the backdrop helps the aesthetic.

Step 5) Take her to a pretty cave. Girls love dimly lit caves for first dates.

Step 6) Introduce her to your hobbies and interests, which in your case is white walkers and white walkers alone. Couples who nerd out together stay together.

Step 7) Establish non-sexual physical contact to make sure that you’re welcome in her personal space. 

Step 8) Tell her you believe in her when she comes to you with a problem. She wants someone to listen, not to problem solve.

Step 9) The key to every single mother’s heart is, gain your future step childrens’ trust. Since her kids are literal fire breathing dragons who could kill you, it’s high risk, high reward. But if you succeed…Boom Overies! 

Step 10) When your competition tries to steal your thunder to impress your girl, activate full alpha male irrational mode.  It’s a bad plan but it’s worth it because you found out that she fears for your life more. 

Step 11) Leave her with a fearless warrior’s goodbye, like the smooth talking bastard you are and hope that she misses you half as much as you did when you waited for her at the cliff daily hoping she would return safely from battle.

Step 12) Oh shit she flirted back. Shit…shit…shit…you weren’t prepared for this. Be cool, Jon! Quick, say something normal and Kingly. 

Step 13) No situation is too dire to not check in and send a raven to bae, even when a hoard of ice zombies are chasing you. Especially, when a hoard of ice zombies is chasing you, because now that your jealous alpha male daze has passed, you can see that your plan sucks and only bae can save the day.

Step 14) Admire her badassery when she literally descends from the sky on a firebreathing dragon like the angel of death here to save you in your most hopeless moment. Congratulations! You now know how much she loves you. If you are the shortest person in the squad, shove them aside to check out  bae.

Step 15) Don’t miss the opportunity to put your heroics on display. If you swing your sword like a total badass, maybe she’ll want to hold your other sword later.

Step 16) Even while dying of hypothermia flex your chest and abs when she’s looking. Gotta be hot and mysterious with those scars until your dying breath.

Step 17) Comfort her as she grieves, apologise for the plan that caused her great loss and most of all now that she’s all in, bend the fucking knee already.

Step 18) Come up with a cute an endearing nickname for her and casually slip it into conversation.

Step 19) Now that you know she has triggering memories of that nickname, settle for her greatest kink instead.

Step 20) Did she just hold your hand? Yes! It really is her greatest kink! Now that you are on on a winning streak like the smooth bastard you are and there’s solid hand holding action going on, don’t let go. Hold on tighter and look at her with those longing direwolf puppy eyes and beg her to stay. You might be at the brink of death but you’ve died before, no big deal, you can muster the strength to bone.

Step 21) Well how about that you horny idiot? You read all the signs wrong! Now is not the time, she’s grieving. Close your eyes to escape this awkward situation before you die of embarrassment and pretend to sleep. You’re doing great sweetie.

Step 22) Declare your loyalty to her at the least opportune time. It might seem ill advised, but you’re not here for politics, you’re here to look sexy in your furcoat & turn on your woman.

Step 23) Now that she’s completely onboard with your zombie killing interests, learn more about her heritage & culture. ‘Couples who nerd out together, stay together’ is a two way street. Gotta learn everything about Dragons & High Valarian quotes.

Step 24) You’ve been a defiant & unimpressed bad boy all this time but in her most hopeless moment, confess how amazing she is in your eyes. 

Step 25) As someone who has come back to life even though the witch performing the ritual didn’t believe she could do it, you dont buy into magic birth control setup by low level witches. Slip your ability to impregnate her casually into conversation.

Step 26) Invite her on your boat, nothing sets the room like a romantic cruise.

Step 27) Come on Jon, you’ve fought zombies! Don’t be afraid to ride the dragon…knock on her door already & just barge in like the smooth & take charge bastard you are.

Step 28) Take a moment to really appreciate & let it sink in that you actually are balls deep in your Queen. You did it Jonny boy! You do know some things ;)

Dany’s version - How to flirt with a King like Daenerys Targaryen 

wistfulstudys  asked:

How do roundhouse kicks work? Are they actually combat efficient?

The roundhouse kick is a common kick seen in street fights, and for this reason lots of counters have been developed for it. So, it does work, it is effective, and easy to do compared to other kicks. It’s powerful (though not as powerful as the sidekick or back kick), but is the riskiest because it’s easy to trap.

Of the four beginning kicks, the roundhouse is the only kick that comes across the body. The others all strike directly. The roundhouse targets the side of the body or enemies in the fighting stance. This is part of what makes the roundhouse more visible than the other kicks. Your peripheral vision is great for noticing motion coming in on the edge of your vision, and circles are eye-catching. The roundhouse kick is an arc. Like all kicks, it’s one big body movement coming at you in flashing neon lights.

As a general rule, kicks are always riskier than punches. They’re reliant on speed and balance, and they come with obvious tells. Still, kicks are much more powerful than a punch, delivering more force at high speeds directly into the body. After all, with more risks come more rewards.

A single well placed kick can end a fight before it begins… if you can land it.

As for whether the roundhouse is combat efficient, that really depends on the individual and how limber they are. Cold kicks will punish you, pull your hamstrings, and wreck your legs if you’re not stretching on the regular. Your success with using kicks in combat is almost entirely dependent on your flexibility. When jumping into straight into a fight, you don’t get a time out for a five to ten minute warm up.

With that covered, let’s get down to the basics for the roundhouse.

The roundhouse is the second kick you’ll learn in most martial arts systems, after the front kick and before the sidekick. It relies on the rotational power of the hips to bring the leg across the body, striking with either the top or the ball of the foot. The attack comes on a diagonal, with points at either the head, stomach/ribs, or (in some variation) the legs/upper thigh. The structure of the roundhouse is as follows:

1) Beginning Stance:

Unlike the front kick which can be done from any forward facing, standing position, the roundhouse requires you be in a fighting stance.

A stance is a basic part of martial arts, but usually skipped over by Hollywood and beginners for strikes. Strikes are the big flashy moves that get attention because they are flashy. As with everything, the building blocks are often skipped.

Stances are what we call your “base” or how you set your body and your feet. Most martial arts disciplines will have a full set of stances from the front stance to the horse stance, and they will be referred to by different names. The fighting stance is easily recognizable. As it is the stance you’ll see everyone drop into on or off screen when they’re getting ready to fight.

The fighting stance is meant for basic defensive positioning, allowing you to move quickly. In Taekwondo, the fighting stance is one foot forward and the other foot is a step behind (about the width of your shoulders) on a diagonal. The back foot twists sideways roughly to a 45 degree angle, the front foot points forward. Your upper body turns on a diagonal following your back foot. Your hands clench to fists, and rise to your face. The hand over the front foot extends out, the other hand hovers beside your cheek. Your elbows come in, just inside the silhouette of your body. Your knees bend. Weight will adjust in a tilt slightly forward or slightly back depending on attack vector. The bouncing seen in sparring tournaments or boxing is meant to cover these weight shifts. In the fighting stance, you should never stand flat footed.

This is the basic protective stance for sparring.

Body Reader Note: Elbow, hand, upper body, and feet placement are all dead giveaways when someone doesn’t know what they’re doing. Failure begins with your feet. The hands especially, most beginners do not keep their hands far enough apart, their elbows come out too far from the body. Beginners will often leave the front foot flat on the ground with their weight unbalanced, slowing their reaction time.

On Weight Shifts: Leaning back generally means a kick as the upper body tilts backward for balance when the leg extends. Forward for hands. Settled on the back leg can also be a defensive posture, versus weight forward which is more aggressive. You want to be on the balls of your feet because that means quicker response times.

2) Chamber

The chamber is the intermediary step between the fighting stance and the kick. This is when you lift your leg off the ground with knee bent. The transition between chamber and kick is where most of the classic mistakes happen. You chamber with either the front or back leg. For the roundhouse kick, the foot left on the ground twists on a ninety degree angle. Your foot to your body should form a perfect right angle. (This is why the roundhouse kick is easy, you only shift another forty-five degrees rather than the full 180 for the sidekick.) The knee is on a similar forty-five degree, ready to extend across the body.

The upper body doesn’t move that much with the roundhouse, unlike the sidekick where the whole upper body tilts onto a forty-five as the leg extends. It tilts ever so slightly to retain balance as you kick and your hips twist.

3) The Kick

As I said before, the roundhouse strikes horizontally or diagonally across the body. It is true to its name. It comes around in a circular motion. The leg extends and swings across/through the opponent’s body as the hips simultaneously twist. When done in a simultaneous motion, the supporting foot twists to a ninety degree angle at the same moment the hips turn over. The upper body tilts with the hips. The leg swings through.

If the hips don’t turn over, then the kick is what we call a “snap kick”. In the case of the roundhouse, this is a kick than snaps up off the knee on a forty-five degree diagonal. It is fast but without power, and usually performed with the front leg only.

Power comes from the hips. You can lay in as much speed as you like, but without turnover there’s no power. (Snap kicks find their best use as openers in point sparring.)

The second problem with most kicks is visualization. You don’t stop when you reach the enemy, you kick through them. This carries the impact and force further.

The roundhouse strikes with either the top of the foot or the ball of the foot. Ball of the foot requires you pull your toes back, or else you’ll break them. Top is the speed kick (light, fast), ball is the power kick (can break ribs). Top of the foot is generally only seen in sparring exercises when your feet are protected by pads, but it’s a good option when you’re wearing shoes and your toes can’t bend.

4) Recoil

This is the return to the chamber. After extension finishes, the leg snaps back out of danger. If your opponent doesn’t catch your leg in the moment before the full extension, they can still catch it after the fact. Quick recoil is as essential to a kick’s success as the extension. It’s also necessary to keep us from overextending.

After they’ve mastered the chamber and extension, beginners will often have difficulty with this step. It has all the same problems as the chamber, just going in the opposite direction. A good recoil is a sign of strong control over the leg.

5) Plant

Return to start or prepare for transition into the next kick. The leg comes down, plants itself on the floor, and the fighter is ready to either continue attacking or begin defending.

A poor plant means that you’ve now messed up your fighting stance. If the foot comes down in the wrong place, the stance becomes unbalanced. A stance that is either too wide or two shallow creates opportunities for your opponent to destabilize you and make it difficult to attack again without over extending.

Those are the steps of the roundhouse. Throw them all together and you’ve got the full kick. The roundhouse has a very specific usage in martial arts that makes it valuable. The purpose of the roundhouse is simple: it’s a kick built for striking an enemy who is also in a fighting stance.

When our bodies are turned on a diagonal our vitals are better protected than they are when we’re forward facing. It becomes difficult, or more risky for a direct forward strike to land. The roundhouse attacks in a circle, coming around from the side and on angle. It creates a new vector attack those protected vitals like the stomach.

This is why the roundhouse is a popular kick. It is simple, and effective at ghosting around the first, opening opposition. (It’s also easily blocked with both hands and legs, but that’s a story for another day.) However, this is not why Chuck Norris’ roundhouse became the stuff of legend.

Perhaps more so than the sidekick, the roundhouse is iconic in popular culture. The roundhouse looks fantastic on film.  It has a beautiful silhouette, it’s eye catching but also easy to follow. It looks more dynamic than most of the other basic kicks, and it’s simple. An actor you’ve only got three months to train before filming can learn the basics of this kick. They won’t look great, but no one can tell. It doesn’t require the same flexibility as the more advanced kicks like the axe kick. Nor does it require the finesse, balance, or control of the sidekick. It’s the sort of kick where general audiences can’t tell if the practitioner is new or their technique sucks, and blends easily with the stunt doubles. Audiences have a difficult time telling the difference between a kick with power and a kick without power.

The roundhouse is the most common kick seen in taekwondo tournaments, and very common in kickboxing for its speed. It is faster and easier than the front kick and the sidekick due to the twist necessary to throw the leg across the body. With the roundhouse, momentum will do most of the work for you. This is why it’s the most common kick to see untrained fighters attempt to mimic, and why it gets used on the streets.

It can be effective without much training, but that person can be totally screwed when paired against someone who knows what they’re doing. Due to it’s vector, the roundhouse is the easiest kick to catch. Whether it’s caught and hooked under the arm for a knee break or the full thing gets caught and lifted into a throw, it doesn’t matter. A poorly performed or unlucky roundhouse can really screw you over. The other problem is that the circular motion of the roundhouse makes it the least camouflaged by the body and the easiest to see coming.

So, yes, the roundhouse can be combat efficient. They’re also dependent on your ability to follow through the steps on rough terrain where friction is not amenable to foot twists. They come with obvious tells for when the kick is about to happen, and there are a lot of counters developed to deal with them.

Whether coming or going, for one side or the other, the roundhouse has the potential to wreck your day.

 -Michi

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if you’re looking for a high risk high reward kind of way to make thursday interesting: make a list of the five most influential relationships you had in your life. i don’t mean romantic, but they can be. it doesn’t have to be people or even something tangible, a relationship with music counts. but if it is people? write out what changed you and what your journey was with them and what happened between you two. and tell them. tell them they mattered to you. watch what happens, because the plain truth is that we don’t tell people enough that their love for us made us better. just for a day, in this whole ugly world that’s trying to kill any form of kindness: be thankful. it’s important. imagine what it would be like to get that kind of affirmation that you matter. just… watch how it changes someone to hear that. i don’t know. i think it’s sort of cathartic to be vulnerable like that. but i love you. and you matter. 

Masterlist

Warnings: * means includes smut

Stiles Stilinski:

A World I Wouldn’t Want To Live In // Soulmate AU *

Mischief and Babygirl *

I’ll Keep You Safe // AU * (collab with @sarcasticallystilinski)

When I Was Your Man *

Echo House *

Not a Threat // Stydia Imagine 

Series:

1. Friends With Benefits 

Part One (I Don’t See Why Not) *

Part Two (Guilty Pleasures) **

Part Three (The Flick Of A Switch) *

Part Four (The Unthinkable Truth) *

Part Five (Risk and Reward?)

Part Six (Million Reasons)

Epilogue **

2. Somebody Else (collab with @sarcasticallystilinski)

Prologue 

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four *

Part Five

Part Six

Part Seven 

Part Eight *

3. The Color Of My World (Soulmate AU)

Part One (The Color Of My World)

Part Two (Midnight Memories)

Part Three (Pulsing Heartbeats) *

Part Four (Feel Real) **

Part Five (Another Heartbeat) **

Part Six (The Weight) *

Part Seven (The Night We Met) *

Part Eight (Fragments) *

Part Nine (The New Color Of My World)


Dylan O’Brien:

Fire and Ice *

Stoned On You *** (collab with @stilinski-jpeg)

Play Me *

I’m Not His, I’m Yours *

Best. Birthday. Ever. * (collab with @mf-despair-queen)

Wedding Night *

Filling The Void *

New On Set 

Series: 

1. Misguided Texts

Part One *

Part Two *


Thomas:

Behind Closed Doors **


Mitch Rapp:

Beauty and The Assassin **

Yes, Sir * (collab with @stilinski-jpeg)

Caught In The Crossfire **

Series:

1. The Preacher’s Daughter

Part One (One Of Those Nights) *

Part Two (About Last Night) **

Part Three (Exposure) **

Part Four (Dark Star) *

Part Five (Everything Has A Price) *

Part Six (The Price Of Everything) *

Part Seven (Angel With A Shotgun)


Some of these imagines were written when I was first starting out as a writer, so they may not be the absolute best. But, either way, I hope you enjoy them. 

Originally posted by stvlinski

Who should you fight: Voltron Edition

Shiro: Bruh why the fuck would you want to fight Shiro? One, the dude will probably destroy you. Two, the poor guy needs a break. Don’t fight him. Wrap him in some blankets, throw on some Netflix, and cut him some slack. You monster.

Keith: Fuck yeah, you should fight him. You’ll probably get your ass kicked, but it’ll be a good time and he’ll most likely thank you in the process

Lance: Nah, Lance is too chill to fight. Every time he hits you with a lame flirtation, though, you can take one free shot, so make it count.

Pidge: What the everloving fuck makes you think you can take on Pidge

Hunk: If you think you should fight Hunk, then you can get out of my face right now. I’m also gonna need an apology delivered to my house in writing within seven days.

Allura: Probably the most dangerous one here. Girl’s got super strength and absolutely no chill. Don’t fight her. Fear her.

Coran: Absolutely. He’s an old fart and his back will probably give out before he can defend himself. But, it’s almost like beating up your cool uncle, so use your best judgement.

Slav: It’s kinda pointless because you already know that if you have the opportunity to deck Slav, then Shiro’s probably already beaten you to it.

Matt: I’d say go for it, but be careful. You might get Pidge and Shiro jumping to his defense, and that’s a battle you have no chance of winning.

Alfor: Fighting Alfor would probs be pretty rewarding because he’s a total dumb jock in his youth and probably wouldn’t see a sucker punch coming. Aim for the unarmored parts and you’d probably be alright. 

Zarkon: Hell yeah fuck that withered turtle-man up

Haggar: Again, hell yeah. But proceed with caution because she’ll probably shoot you with some magic if you aren’t fast enough. I’d say the risk is worth the reward though.

Lotor: If you catch him alone, go for it. Make that daddy’s boy cry, hard. However, if he’s got his generals with him, good freaking luck.

S3 Shiro/Kuron: 100 percent. The harder you hit him, the better chance you have of knocking that stupid-ass hairdo off his head. 

#MondayMotivation

7 Reasons Why You Need To Chase Your Dreams

1. What do you have to lose? Something that holds many of us back from chasing our dreams is what others will think of us if we fail. If we take the opinions of others too seriously we become their prisoner and waste our whole lives chasing the validation of others rather than living our lives for ourselves.

2. It’s an experience. Regardless of how our journeys end - it’s the experiences we’ve had along the way that make our lives worth living. It’s not about the number of years in the life that count - rather it’s the life in the years. We can put more life into our years by chasing our dreams.

3. There’s no such thing as security. Some of us have been told that trying to be great is too risky and that we should live for “security” - there is no such thing as security because tomorrow is never promised. The only choice we have to make is if we want to die with memories or regrets.

4. Playing it safe leads to resentment. Whether it’s a job, relationship or way of life - we need to create the life we want to live, or else we’ll suffer the pain of regret which turns to resentment over time. Settling for less than we know we’re truly worth is the path that leads to us resenting everything and everyone around us.

5. We’re gonna die anyway. The only reward for not chasing our dreams is comfort, we get to remain safe in a small bubble of limitation. There’s a whole world to explore, remaining in a comfort zone is a choice that many of us make - which is why so many people on the planet are suffering internally every day.

6. Low risk - low reward. There’s no such thing as something for nothing, we have to be willing to spend either our time or money to acquire that which we seek. If we aren’t willing to risk what we have now, we will never have what we desire.

7. What’s the worst that can happen? We’re on a rock in the middle of space flying around a massive ball of fire - there are no certainties in this life except death. There’s nothing holding us back from greatness except ourselves.

Our lives are made from the choices we make, choose to be great.

Peace & positive vibes.

Risk For Reward (Finn Balor) Vol. 15

Originally posted by itsalwayssunnyinaz

Prompt: You are the new make-up artist for WWE. You have no prior knowledge of Finn or the work that goes into creating the demon. With a whole new world to discover is there room to be anything but professional? Your biggest test will be fighting your new demon(s) and showing that’s this job was made for you. Even if resisting Finn will be harder than you first thought.

Pairing: Finn Balor & Reader

Word count: 4.1k

Warning: A whole lot of fluff. So much fluff.

Tag List!! ; @ambrosegirlforever | @valeonmars | @thebadchic | @nickysmum1909 | @vsturgeon5489 | @jade4062022 | @rebelfleur22 @seths-skinny-jeans | @lakama15 | @southernbelle24 | @wwefangirlllll | @spiderman2289 | @nickie-amore | @blondekel77 | @princess3733 | @toosweetme | @unabashedwwesmut | @iwannadiehere | @mandazord | @reigns420 | @sfreeborn | @shieldlovereve | @isawthesights | @cam0flug3 | @cfloyd776 | @ashleyvc88 | @xfirespritex | @taryndibiase | @alexahood21 | @itsnethbellins | @castielscamander | @thephenomenonalkingofthebrogues |  sleepsiehollowreads | etherealmoonlight | florenceivy | georgiadean37

Please let me know if you would like to be tagged! I’d be more than happy to add you! :)

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Another Chance

Summary: The reader ends up on a double date with Dean. Will they have a good time or will they drive themselves and everyone else crazy?

Pairing: Dean x Reader

Word Count: 1,979


“I can’t do this. I’m leaving your ass here. Call me when you need to be picked up!” You declare strongly, ignoring the sheer panic flashing across your best friend’s pretty features.

“Don’t you dare. Let’s go!” Jenny huffs theatrically, grabbing a hold of your bicep and refusing to set you free.

“I did not agree to this.” You whine dramatically making your best friend suddenly shoot daggers at you.

“You agreed to go on this double date! Come on, Y/N. This is my first date with Sam and I’m really nervous. I need a buffer.”

“I figured my date would be someone I actually like. Sam has so many cute friends and he picked his god damn brother. What the fuck?”

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Dungeon Design: Guiding Player Movement Part II

This time I’m going to go over some factors that guide movement that are less about visual composition and more about content. I am using the same map from Part 1, a map of an icy cavern frost giants are using as a lair. An entrance to a hero’s lost tomb is located within.

Mechanical Design

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anonymous asked:

Is there ever a good reason to turn your back on someone in a close-up fight (like spinning around or whatever) that isn't running away?

Okay, the Hollywood spin that you see in a lot of fight scenes is bunk. These random spins are just there because spinning is dynamic and looks better on screen.

The answer to your question is that we don’t really spin to dodge attacks, we utilize spins to gain momentum. If you take into consideration that power comes from the momentum of your body in motion, then spinning and jumping lend themselves to more powerful techniques.

Spinning techniques open up a can of worms when talking about real fights, not really whether or not they work. That’s not up for debate. The question is, should you risk it? It’s a combat philosophy question.

This is about risk versus reward.

Spin kicks and jump kicks are the more advanced versions of the basic and the intermediary kicks. Any spinning or jump technique will have a version on the ground that must be learned first. The more complexity is added to a technique, the more your fundamentals and basics become important. A sloppy hook kick will translate into a sloppy spinning hook kick. The more force there is at play then the greater the risk of injury to yourself if you mess up. Broken ankles, fractured toes, broken legs, busted or blown knees, torn tendons are all risks beyond just the standard pulled leg muscles.

Remember, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The more force you generate to put into someone else, the greater the chance that same force has of rebounding on you. Poor technique increases the chance of injury, but there is no way to ever do any of these techniques in complete safety. You have to trust yourself and your ability to perform.

Jump kicks, spin kicks, spinning hand strikes, and flying punches exist as techniques across multiple martial arts disciplines. The body in motion creates momentum which is the source of power. When you spin, or run, or jump, you create a lot more momentum then you will from a standing position. These techniques are the more powerful upgrades of their non-jumping, non-spinning, ground based counterparts.

Someone flying at you can break your bones, and its potentially lethal. There are dozens of videos from kickboxing matches and taekwondo tournaments showcasing knockouts from wheel kicks and 360 degree jump roundhouses. The wheel kick or spinning hook kick can and does knock people out in sparring matches, tournaments, and professional fights.

A landed kick will drive the force of the blow through the headgear or head protection meant to soften the impact. If they manage to land the wheel kick while jumping then it is even stronger than it was on the ground. Spinning and jumping combine into the ultimate power up. The art of the flying death kick is not a joke. Well, not completely. Lots of martial arts styles have their own variants on spin techniques, from spinning kicks to spinning backfists and even elbows. We can go back and forth debating in what context they work, but they do exist. They do work, and they populate many different martial styles.

Spin kicks, jump kicks, jump spin kicks, any spinning technique is risky business. They’re powerful finishers. They can be used as openers, but if you fail then you leave yourself wide open. Most of the time you’re going to need to set your spins up via combinations to create the necessary openings in your opponent’s defense. 

That said, turning your back on your opponent is a bad idea. Running away in close quarters when you haven’t created an opening is a terrible one. The same is true for spin techniques. You need great timing and the ability to create openings in order to pull them off. The crux of the issue is: they’re high risk, high reward. When we perform a spin kick is we’re turning our back on our opponent and trusting they’ll still be there by the time we’ve finished our turn. Your opponent is never just going to stand there and let you hit them. You’ve got to make sure they’re not going anywhere first.

The combat philosophy on spin techniques varies from individual to individual. Some will say never do it as what you get isn’t worth the risk, and others will do it and make it work. You’ve got to decide for yourself if the benefits outweigh the risks.

For writers, especially ones without experience, it’s important to understand that spinning jump kicks are among the most difficult kicking techniques. Spinning is advanced martial arts. If your character doesn’t come out of a strong kicking discipline, it’s unlikely they’ll ever consider you using them. Even if they do, they may decide they’re too risky.

If you, the writer haven’t figured out how the basic kicks like the front kick, the roundhouse, and the sidekick work then wrapping your head around the mechanics of a spin kick is going to be difficult. This is before we get to the combat applications of when or how we use kicks like the wheel kick, the spinning jump roundhouse, or the popup back kick.

And that’s okay if you look at these kicks, think they’re awesome, and when you sit down to try to write what you saw get confused by how they work. The advanced kicks are mysteries to the white belts too. That’s normal.

Mechanically, these kicks are fairly complex. Sometimes, there’s switching between the legs that happens. Multiple body parts are all moving at the same time. With the wheel kick, you turn and look over your shoulder, lift your leg, extend your leg, and spin in one almost simultaneous spin. You need to spin while balanced entirely on one leg, not overextend, not be thrown out of whack by your own momentum, and not be destabilized by sudden contact with another object that’s not moving.

It is not uncommon when learning these kicks to lose your balance and fall over, to experience vertigo, lose track of your target and get really dizzy. You stumble, you fall, you get scared. It can very be intimidating.

Writers, if you find yourself looking at these techniques and getting confused don’t worry about it. You’re seeing kicks that are studied between blue (in TKD basic popup kicks, axe kick, crescent kick), brown to red (wheel kick, jump axe kick, jump crescent kick, jump wheel kick, and advanced popups), and black belt (kicks like tornado kick, the 540, and the 720). These are kicks learned two to four years into a student’s training, when they have a strong foundation. Don’t get down on yourself for not being a black belt if you’ve never done martial arts.

Ironically, the best way to train your pen is start with writing the basic kicks and work up. If you can figure out the application for the back kick and the hook kick in a written scene, you’ll begin understanding the wheel kick.

If you want to watch the knockouts in action, here are some videos. (Warning: do not watch any of the following videos if you are uncomfortable with watching real human beings, some of whom are minors get knocked out.)  If you want to watch a lot of these in action then look up videos like The Best Taekowndo Knockouts KO. Or this Tornado Kick KO (360 degree jump roundhouse) from MMA. Lawrence Kenshin did a decent breakdown of these kicks. (Learning the Tornado Kick was how I fractured my tibia when I was twelve.)

-Michi

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You can’t live the life you have & the life you want at the same time. You have to choose one. You have to change your habits completely.

Decide who it is you want to be, life is going to demand something entirely different for each decision.

Alot of people want to be successful but aren’t willing to give up the good for the great. They don’t want to live average lives, but maintain average habits. They want to work 40 hours a week, but not 80 to live their dreams.

Chasing your dreams isn’t a part time hustle. It’s more like 2 full time jobs. Living a few years, how others won’t- to spend the rest of your life how others dream.

Don’t let people fool you with their words and intentions. Don’t guide yourself by the habits of those who aren’t where you want to be. The road to success is a lonely one. We all have different obstacles to over come, and you need as little distractions in your life as possible.

Risk and Reward

Pairing:Barista!Lin x Reader

Requested?: Nope! It just came to my head one day and I ran with it.

Summary: You stop by a café to grab coffee on your way to work, said café also has a really cute barista.

Words: 5k+

Part One | Part Two

A/N: Well here we are. I had this idea for a real long time but it just never came together. Now I have gotten my shit together (thanks Ale and Kate) and I think I can start this series! Shoutout to Taryn for being a huge inspiration behind this series. Work Comes Home was the reason this idea even became an actual fic and not a passing thought. I really hope you guys like it!

Tags: @fragmentofmymind @secretschuylersister @hamiltonwrotetheother51 @thehamiltonpost @icanneverbesatisfied @sharkastic-issues @villagecrazypeggy @butlinislin @daveeddiggsit @nadialinett14 @librarychild @spidey-boii @me-hoy-me-trash @serkewen12 @daveedish @linmanuclmiranda @autistic-alien @runnerriley @hamilsquad-writings @thegirlonhamilton


You quickly entered the coffee shop, shuffling up to the counter with a panicked expression. Your bus was coming soon and you were running late for your first day at a new job.

“Hi, can I have two medium iced caramel lattes?” You rushed out, already opening your wallet to find your debit card. You got it out and held it towards the barista who was just staring back at you.

“Is there something on my face?” You asked, running your hand over your cheek.

The dark-haired man seemed to snap out of whatever daze he was in, blinking rapidly as he straightened his posture.

“Oh! No, no I’m sorry ma’am. I, uh, I…” He struggled to finish his sentence and you giggled lightly, he was sort of cute.

“It’s okay. I space out too,” you paused to look at his nametag, “Lin.” You finished, holding out your debit card once again.

He nodded, taking your card and looking at the screen in front of him and pausing.

“…I’m sorry what did you order again?” Lin smiled sheepishly, rubbing the back of his neck.

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I like the idea of moral choice in games, but the execution rarely lives up to that–either you’re a kindly saint, or a murderous asshole, with what’s in between consisting mostly of “bland.” Despite this vast gulf of personality, though, the player character must always follow the path set out for them: “go here,” “complete this task,” “resolve this problem,” et cetera. The willingness of characters played as contrary and independent to submit themselves to a predetermined story often stretches the suspension of disbelief.

A somewhat more complex system is the dual axes of the D&D alignment system, but even those were a bit prescriptive for my tastes–“Good vs. Evil” is pretty clear-cut, while “Law vs. Chaos” pertains mostly to differences in method, not motivation. Since tabletop gaming is a more malleable medium, adjustments can be made to tailor the story for the characters in it.

When I started brainstorming for my project, the goal was to formulate a system that subverted standard game-choice tropes while still maintaining narrative continuity for an arguably heroic character. To do this for my protagonist, I decided to focus not on moral and philosophical beliefs, but on two sets of personal attitudes: their conduct and their mindset. Further explanation can be found after the chart.

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Tumblr financial AU with posts like “When diversifying your investments its important to also diversify the representation of marginalized identities in your investments” which then get responded by posts saying “Not everyone has the capital sufficient to enter heavily into high-risk high-reward investments that such a strategy would require!”