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POW! WOW! HAWAII! 2016 Day 4.

This week, February 6th through the 14th, artists from around the world are currently participating in POW! WOW! HAWAII! 2016.  The week-long street art festival features gallery shows, lecture series, schools for art and music, mural projects, concerts and live art installations.  The event also focuses on using art to bring communities together and the feeling of friendship, family and art is very much alive here in Kaka’ako, Honolulu.

Scenes from above: Sonny Boy begins his part of the collaborative wall between him and Risk.  Tatiana Suarez works on her part of the NTL Cru wall.  Andrew Hem doing some details on his and Ekundayo’s wall.  Hula’s gorgeous in progress mural.  Kaplan Bunce works on his sculptures into the night.

You can check out my week long coverage of the event by checking out all of Supersonic’s posts on POW! WOW! HAWAII! 2016 or Supersonic’s Instagram.

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POW! WOW! HAWAII! 2016 Day Three.

This week, February 6th through the 14th, artists from around the world are currently participating in POW! WOW! HAWAII! 2016.  The week-long street art festival features gallery shows, lecture series, schools for art and music, mural projects, concerts and live art installations.  The event also focuses on using art to bring communities together and the feeling of friendship, family and art is very much alive here in Kaka’ako, Honolulu.

The scenes above: Audrey Kawasaki begins to paint the face of her subject on her curved mural.  Bicicleta Sem Freio closing in on finishing their insanely incredible (as usual) mural.  Ghostbeard and Patch Whisky making way with their always awesome work.  The legendary street artist Risk makes progress on his spectacular wall.

You can check out my week long coverage of the event by checking out all of Supersonic’s posts on POW! WOW! HAWAII! 2016 orSupersonic’s Instagram.

Risk (or alternately Risk! back when conversations about the game were apparently intended to include a lot of declarative shouting) is the game of global domination. You assume command of an army of ambiguous nature and intent and attempt to take control of the entire world, crushing those who oppose you under your war-mongering boot heel. There’s no room for diplomacy in Risk – it’s a steel cage match between Jeff Hardy, Jake “The Snake” Roberts, and a shimmering leprechaun cauldron of pure crystal meth. The only victory condition possible is total fucking elimination.

The problem is, the only people who ever suggest playing Risk are the ones who have never lost a game of Risk. It’s like a shorter version of Monopoly, only without the equalizing element of chance. Consequently, the only way to win is to actually be good at the game, and the only people who are good at Risk tend to be cartwheeling douchegoblins about it. Just keeping a copy in your house is like hanging a picture of the time you ran into Shia LaBeouf at Hooters in a frame above your television. It is an accomplishment the rest of us neither envy nor need to be constantly reminded of.

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She will encourage others to step out of their comfort zone and challenge themselves. She wants them to be adventurous and live life to the fullest. But when no one is around she does not dare take a risk. Too dangerous and unknown.
—  9:49pm thoughts// everything and nothing to lose
The Risk of Nursing

Sometimes it doesn’t make a difference how safe, or carefully we practice, the risk and exposure to infections, injuries, or physical/verbal abuse facing nurses everyday is not what we expected when we were in nursing school.

You draw blood from a patient, you’re at risk. You insert IV’s, foleys, or flexi-seals, you’re at risk. You clean patients, you’re at risk. You lift and turn patients, you’re at risk. You say something a patient or family doesn’t like, you’re at risk. You’re in a bloody trauma, you’re at risk. You’re in L&D, the OR or Pacu with open/recently opened body cavities, you’re at risk. You’re at risk every time you touch any patient.

Most days, we likely don’t think much of it, we take all the precautions, we glove up, we wear protective equipment, and we just go about our work - exposed at every moment to the astronomical amount of bodily fluids, or highly invasive/stressful situations. We are at risk by simply walking into a patient’s room.
But we do it anyway.

Risk becomes reality, when you are exposed to HIV or Hep C virus when you sustain a needlestick injury while drawing blood, or inserting an IV. Risk becomes reality when you spend the seconds following the incident frightened, knowing logically the risk of seroconversion may be low - but it’s still damn well there, throwing the world on tilt . Risk becomes reality when you shakily remove your gloves to reveal a blood smear and evidence of contact from a contaminated needle. Risk becomes reality when you are given the post exposure cocktail, enduring the nauseating side effects all the while praying for an outcome with no control. Risk becomes reality when you realize there are statistics approximating over a hundred needlesticks a year in each hospital…with negative results….with very little solace when it happens to you, until all the bloods come back negative.

Risk becomes reality when you’re short staffed, and your patient is saturated in urine and feces, and at the very basics of comfort, dignity and care, you can’t leave them in this state, so despite there being not even one solitary available assist - you clean them solo, you turn them on your own, even though you know better. You’re able to do it, and you feel an odd sort of victory that you can do it on your own, but you’ve converted a risk into reality when you can’t go into work the next day because you’re just so damn sore you can’t even move. Risk becomes reality when you find yourself in this situation again, and despite admin telling its staff to get help, they won’t produce any extra help - it is the very same administrators who ironically take them away. Risk becomes reality when you want to protect yourself, but you still catch yourself in compromising positions, exposing you to injury.

Risk becomes reality, when you’re doing your job within all the guidelines, within the standards of care, and you still become injured. You still wake up and you cry because the pain in your back from lifting and turning people with all the safest precautions in place have still left you immobile and unable to perform in the job you love. Risk becomes reality when you abide by all the policies, as well as safety checks and your patient still punches you in the face, still spits on you, still kicks you while you are simply trying to care for them. Risk becomes reality when you are doing what you can to mediate with families, and you become the target for both the angered patient, and the angered families. Risk becomes a reality when you’re unexpectedly in a wrestling match with a combative patient. Risk becomes reality when a patient conceals the truth about active tuberculosis in their medical history, and you panic, despite how cautious you are every time you come into contact with every TB patient, and then you try to remind yourself that you’re at risk just being on a bus, or subway - but it’s little solace when the patient is mere inches away from you, breathing the same air. Risk becomes reality every time nursing office calls, stating they are floating a much needed nurse, or nursing assistant, off the floor - and you know immediately it means a heavier workload for all, an unsafe workload for all, increasing everyone’s risk of injury.


Perhaps it’s not what we expected, but the idea of anything/anyone preventing us from what we do on an ordinary day to day level is perhaps the biggest risk of all.