rising-sea

The fact that Svt just posted Seungkwan’s amazing cover of “Because of You” (which made me contribute to the rising sea levels with my tears), as well as posting One Fine Day and Smile Flower MV later on this week is just…
Let us Carats and non-Carats alike appreciate Svt’s existence and love. ❤️❤️❤️ I will never stop supporting them, it’s impossible. Becoming a fan of Svt is one of my best decisions in life.

Let's get one thing straight:

Badlands National Park is not in defiance of the president, they are in support of the American People. They don’t work for him, they work for US. Climate change is a direct threat to our national resources, and the most severe threat facing our parks today. This is not a political issue, this is not Democrats vs. Republicans, this is data-backed endangerment of our open spaces and federal lands. If a building is deemed structurally unsound, you fix it, you don’t claim that scientists are lying to you about serious fatigue in the load-bearing members, or else it comes crashing down around you. Climate change is no different, nobody has ever tried to claim that forest fires are a myth invented by the Chinese.

Just One Word February BPC
Day 12: Stars

2

Global sea level rise will disproportionately affect much of the US coastline

  • A new report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration warns that, while sea levels are rising around the world, they’re rising faster than the global average along much of the U.S. coastline.
  • “The ocean is not rising like water would in a bathtub,” NOAA oceanographer and lead author William Sweet said. “For example, in some scenarios sea levels in the Pacific Northwest are expected to rise slower than the global average, but in the Northeast they are expected to rise faster.”
  • As CBS News reported Tuesday, “In the mildest projected scenario, global sea levels will rise by about one foot by the end of this century. In the worst-case scenario, global sea levels will rise by 8.2 feet … A lower rise of six feet would be enough swallow up the homes of about 6 million Americans.” Read more

follow @the-future-now

best musical quotes with no context

- “the funk of moral fiber rotting”

- “for a clitoris is holy amongst all things, said he”

- “driving mad at twelve miles an hour”

- “i have maggots in my scrotum”

- “southern motherfucking democratic republicans”

- “she was the happiest corpse i’d ever seen”

- “he ran into my knife ten times!”

- “rising on a sea of marshmallow foam”

- “on the lake there was a boat, and in the boat there was a man”

- “it’s not like i’m a healthy person”

- “how do you get this gold shit off?”

- “imagine a world with no children, close your eyes and just dream”

- “four jews in a room bitching”

- “bobby maler he’s the best, looks so nasty in those khakis”

- “you’ll be obsessed with all my forest expertise”

- “i’m fucking the fucking president, oh yeah”

- “i got carried away, and not just by balloon”

- “if i stop smoking crack”

- “don’t use a toaster while standin’ in the shower”

- “she got them heebies and jeebies from moonshine and cheap wine and reefer and candy cane”

- “you’ll have kids and they’ll hate you too”

- “a potpourri of contradiction”

- “this is called an aneurysm hook!”

- “please reward our pluck and save this duck”

washingtonpost.com
Scientists confirm that warm ocean water is melting the biggest glacier in East Antarctica
Scientists have now put together all the pieces to confirm that the enormous Totten glacier is losing mass rapidly, and the ocean is responsible.
By https://www.facebook.com/chriscmooney

These waters, the paper asserts, are causing the ice shelf to lose between 63 and 80 billion tons of its mass to the ocean per year, and to lose about 10 meters (32 feet) of thickness annually, a reduction that has been previously noted based on satellite measurements.

This matters because more of East Antarctica flows out towards the sea through the Totten glacier region than for any other glacier in the entirety of the East Antarctic ice sheet. Its entire “catchment,” or the region of ice that slowly flows outward through Totten glacier and its ice shelf, is larger than California. If all of this ice were to end up in the ocean somehow, seas would raise by about 11.5 feet.

“This ice shelf is thinning, and it’s thinning because the ocean is delivering warm water to the ice shelf, just like in West Antarctica,” said Don Blankenship, a glaciologist at the University of Texas at Austin and one of the study’s co-authors. Blankenship was not on the research vessel, but he and his colleagues helped the Australia-based researchers with understanding the contours of the seafloor so they could plan their field investigations into where warm and deep waters could penetrate.

There is no friend as loyal as a book. - Ernest Hemingway

Why Do We Study Ice?

Discover why we study ice and how this research benefits Earth. 

We fly our DC-8 aircraft very low over Antarctica as part of Operation IceBridge – a mission that’s conducting the largest-ever airborne survey of Earth’s polar ice.

Records show that 2015 was the warmest year on record, and this heat affects the Arctic and Antarctica – areas that serve as a kind of air conditioner for Earth and hold an enormous of water.

IceBridge flies over both Greenland and Antarctica to measure how the ice in these areas is changing, in part because of rising average global temperatures.

IceBridge’s data has shown that most of Antarctica’s ice loss is occurring in the western region. All that melting ice flows into the ocean, contributing to sea level rise.

IceBridge has been flying the same routes since the mission began in 2009. Data from the flights help scientists better measure year-to-year changes.

IceBridge carries the most sophisticated snow and ice instruments ever flown.  Its main instrument is called the Airborne Topographic Mapper, or ATM.The ATM laser measure changes in the height of the ice surface by measuring the time it takes for laser light to bounce off the ice and return to the plane – ultimately mapping ice in great detail, like in this image of Antarctica’s Crane Glacier.

For the sake of the laser, IceBridge planes have to fly very low over the surface of snow and ice, sometimes as low as 1,000 feet above the ground. For comparison, commercial flights usually stay around 30,000 feet! Two pilots and a flight enginner manage the many details involved in each 10- to 12-hour flight.

One of the scientific radars that fly aboard IceBridge helped the British Antarctic Survey create this view of what Antarctica would look like without any ice.

IceBridge also studies gravity using a very sensitive instrument that can measure minuscule gravitational changes, allowing scientists to map the ocean cavities underneath the ice edges of Antarctica. This data is essential for understanding how the ice and the ocean interact. The instrument’s detectors are very sensitive to cold, so we bundle it up to keep it warm!

Though the ice sheet of Antarctica is two miles thick in places, the ice still “flows” – faster in some places and slower in others. IceBridge data helps us track how much glaciers change from year-to-year.

Why do we call this mission IceBridge? It is bridging the gap between our Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite, or ICESat – which gathered data from 2003 to 2009 – and ICESat-2, which will launch in 2018.

Learn more about our IceBridge mission here: www.nasa.gov/icebridge and about all of our ice missions on Twitter at @NASA_Ice.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com