riot protest

“It is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. | “The Other America.” Grosse Pointe High School (1968)

9

Sucesos del hoy #18MAYO de 2017 el pueblo venezolano perdió el miedo y tiene más de 40 días en la calle batallando contra la DICTADURA instaurada. Nos han matado a más de 55 hermanos, un régimen genocida que arma a deficientes que actúan junto al ejército para que maten a un pueblo desarmado. Pero nadie se rinde, no tenemos miedo a pesar de que estamos completamente solos.

Ayúdanos difundiendo estás imágenes que demuestran la verdadera realidad de Venezuela. Realidad que está totalmente censurada por el gobierno amenazando a los medios con cárcel por decir la verdad. Las únicas herramientas son las redes sociales y no sabemos hasta cuando!

VENEZUELA TE NECESITA! PA'LANTE!

Fotos de nuestros valientes reporteros gráficos y periodistas que día a día arriesgan sus vidas para mostrar la realidad:

@donaldobarros
@ramzisouki
@ipaniza
@bsantan2
@oelzer
@igfotografia
@serialchilling
@bruzco1

The Silent Parade 100th Anniversary

The Silent Parade was a silent protest march of 8,000-10,000 African Americans along Fifth Avenue starting at 57th Street in New York City on July 28, 1917.

In protest to murders, lynchings, and other violence directed towards African Americans, the parade was precipitated by the East St. Louis riots in May and July 1917, when between 40 and 250 black people were killed by white mobs.

East St. Louis riots

The ferocious brutality of the attacks by murderous white mobs, and the refusal by the authorities to protect innocent lives contributed to the reactionary measures of some African Americans in St. Louis and the nation. Marcus Garvey declared in a speech that the riot was “one of the bloodiest outrages against mankind” and a “wholesale massacre of our people”, insisting that “This is no time for fine words, but a time to lift one’s voice against the savagery of a people who claim to be the dispensers of democracy.

Protest in New York

In New York City on July 28, as many as ten thousand African Americans marched down Fifth Avenue in a silent protest march in response to the East St. Louis riots. They carried signs that highlighted protests about the riots. The march was organized by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), W. E. B. Du Bois, and groups in Harlem. Women and children were dressed in white; the men were dressed in black.

They hoped to influence Democratic President Woodrow Wilson to carry through on his election promises to African-American voters to implement anti-lynching legislation, and promote Black causes. Wilson did not do so, and repudiated his promises, and federal discrimination increased during Wilson’s presidency.

Legacy

The parade was the very first protest of its kind in New York, and the second instance of African Americans publicly demonstrating for civil rights so bravely.

7

this is a tired country, tired of dying because there is no food, tired of dying because you cant find medicines, you die protesting or you die when someone decides to steal your phone (that’s how much a Venezuelan life costs).
I’m posting this because I have A LOT of friends outside Venezuela and they don’t know what is going on here, we don’t know what is happening in Caracas, except for what people posts on twitter or instagram, and the internet isn’t working well, and I wanted people  to know what’s happening here