ring of sauron

Silmarillion Project Help

As some of you well know, this semester I am attending a lecture class called the ‘Life and Works of J.R.R. Tolkien’. As expected, we have a finale project at the end of the semester in which we are supposed to present. Such must of course relate in some mannerism to Tolkien’s life or his works.

For myself, I have decided to discuss the dynamics between Morgoth and Sauron, primarily their roles as Dark Lords. The presentation within itself is to explore the differences between their approach and ultimately strive to answer the question– could it be argued that one is more dangerous than the other?

As some of you know, an often disputed conversation is a quote found within the Silmarillion when Sauron is first introduced stating; “–and was only less evil than his master in that for long he served another and not himself.” It is obvious from a logical approach, Sauron cannot be more powerful (or even equal) to the authority of Melkor, as being a maiar; he is physically weaker to that of a Valar, especially one that is ‘mightiest among the Ainur

However, as directed in the Silmarillion; “In all the deeds of Melkor the Morgoth upon Arda, in his vast works and in he deceits of his cunning, Sauron had a part–” Sauron’s influence in Melkor’s dominance over Arda cannot be disputed or discredited. But as we are evidently shown throughout the legendarium, Sauron was no master of war. Where as Morgoth could easily designate with brute force, his servant had to turn towards charm and manipulation for gain.

Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to discuss the basis of Chaotic Evil vs Lawful Evil. Such is where I would love to have your thoughts and/or opinnions upon this topic for I do not believe there is an honest answer here. 

Some may believe that Sauron came closer to achieving the conquering of Middle Earth in the 6,000 years he reigned from the Second to Third Age then Melkor managed to accomplish in the 50,000 years that was the First Age. However, an argument could be poised that Sauron faced a lesser competition, with the glory of the elves fading and the Valar retreating from this world. After all, Morgoth did manage to hold superiority for 50,000 years. 

But what do you all think? Is the brutality of Morgoth more deserving of the accreditation of a Dark Lord or do you believe in the slyness of Sauron proved a much more deadly advisory? Feel free to comment on this post or even reblog with your ideas or simply share to help spread the word! After all, asking yourself who’d be worse to deal with is a lot left up to opinion then an honest answer and because of that– I need opinions for this presentation!

- Ardie

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bilbo “im gonna use this ring of ultimate power to avoid uncomfortable social situations” baggins (insp.)

i cant believe i spent several hours of the only life ill ever have drawing this…….. worth it.

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lotr 30 days challenge: day 17 | favorite antagonist
«..And there is Sauron. In the Silmarillion and Tales of the First Age Sauron was a being of Valinor perverted to the service of the Enemy and becoming his chief captain and servant. He repents in fear when the First Enemy is utterly defeated, but in the end does not do as was commanded, return to the judgement of the gods. He lingers in Middle-earth. Very slowly, beginning with fair motives: the reorganising and rehabilitation of the ruin of Middle-earth, ‘neglected by the gods’, he becomes a re-incarnation of Evil, and a thing lusting for Complete Power – and so consumed ever more fiercely with hate.»

It’s a bit more complicated than invisibility...

This occurred to me and I feel it’s worth posting since I’ve never seen any talk on this?

The One Ring doesn’t make you invisible. 

Why would it? Seriously, what purpose on Eru’s green earth does that serve? Sauron forging his ring of power in the heart of a volcano, thinking to himself, ah yes, invisibility would be a good trick to build into this thing! No. Cause you know what? Sauron’s ring does not make him invisible. And he certainly did not intend for anyone else to ever have it. So what’s it really doing?

Two words: Dimensional shift

I believe that when mortals put on the ring, they experience a dimensional shift in which they are pulled (stretched, transported) into a higher dimension, the plane on which the true spirit forms of the Ainur (and wraiths) exist. This would effectively render them invisible to those on lower dimensions, but the wearer would be able to view them with altered enhanced perception. Such as the effects we witness as described by those who have worn the ring. Especially well portrayed in the films is the ability to see the souls of others, particularly the ringwraiths (the battle on Weathertop is a good example, as well as even in Battle of the Five Armies when Bilbo is in Dale), black and white shadowy souls clear as day but invisible to the naked eye, as they exist on a different dimensional plane. It’s quite possible to me that the ëalar of the Ainur are in a higher dimension than that of mortal fëar, but that’s beside the point. They’re at least a couple dimensions removed from our reality, and thus invisible until one puts on the ring. 

Now, why would the ring have this power? I think, if I recall correctly, that Tolkien at one point did state that it was not intentional, that it was a byproduct of its making. Again, it does not turn Sauron invisible - it wouldn’t, he already exists on that plane. Mortals are bound to their bodies and so would not be able to perceive that higher dimension, but Ainur are not. I think most plausibly, this effect exists because Sauron infused a piece of his own soul into the one ring. The consequences of this are not well understood (it’s not like it’s a common practice) and we know in other ways, it is so strong in its desire to hearken back to its master, it can even influence the wills - a product of the souls - of those around it. I would not be surprised in the slightest if having a piece of Ainur ëala in an all-powerful object would result in the ability to bend reality to attempt to match the wearer to the properties of the owner. It would bring the wearer closer to Sauron, and allow him to perceive them, thus furthering its purpose to return to the whole from which it is a part. 

Just a theory, obviously, but I find it odd that I’ve never seen anyone question the rather absurd notion of ‘magic evil ring makes you invisible!’ Tolkien set up so many intriguing questions, concepts, and possibilities with underlying scientific principles - or at least, consistent rules - that I am sure this fits into his framework. 

LEGO BATMAN: The multifandom villain team



Originally posted by sanctuaryforall1

Originally posted by gondorbutt

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Originally posted by welcometoyouredoom


Someone has been watching a lot of memes and that someone is me lol.

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middle earth meme: [1/3 races] the maiar (specifically, some of my favourites)

The Maiar were Ainur, offspring of  Eru Ilúvatar’s thoughts before the world was made. They were akin to the Valar but lesser in power than the Holy Ones who were the chief shapers of the world. The Maiar were typically devoted to and served specific Valar, being of like stock. For example, Eönwë and Ilmarë, who together were Chiefs of the Maiar, served Manwë and Varda respectively, while Sauron was of Aulë’s folk before being seduced into the service of Melkor. The Maiar were fëar (spirits) but unlike the Children of Ilúvatar, they do not need to possess hröar (bodies) to appear to the Children, manifesting themselves in a fana (vales). It is insinuated, in the tale of Melian the Maia and Elu Thingol the Elf, that should a Maia wed with one of the Children they shall take up Elven forms and be bound forever to them. They are immortal, and like the Elves, they are bound to Arda until its end and cannot die in the matter of the Children, though their spirits may be weakened to the point of never again causing harm, such as the case of Sauron after the destruction of the One Ring. Among the Maiar were Balrogs, who were those corrupted by Melkor the Marrer. 

  • <p> <b>Tolkien:</b> By the end of the Third Age, Sauron's physical power is so diminished that his presence is confined to the tower of Barad-Dur. However, he is still immensely powerful in his ability to watch and predict the movements of his enemies, and his understanding extends so far that he could metaphorically be referred to as a Great Eye, constantly watching and planning his next move. And because his gaze is so piercing, it is sometimes likened to fire.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Okay but...hear me out...what if Sauron was literally....a Great Eye.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> What.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> What if he was literally a giant eyeball on the top of Barad-Dur.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> That's not quite what I inten-<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Made of FIRE. A LITERAL GIANT FIERY EYEBALL.<p/></p>