rights league

Black Canary Appreciation Post since y’all love to sleep on my girl so much
  •   Her Canary Cry is strong af. My girl can break things, shatter metal, kill aliens, rip almost anyone’s head off with it. 
  • “She possesses a incredible degree of control over her vocal cords. This enables her to mimic sounds and generate any sound she desires.“


  • "Canary Cry has been able to reach 300 decibels,which is enough to make a person’s ears start bleeding even if they’re not the target.


  • MARTIAL ARTS. She is one of the most skilled martial artists in DC. She is an expert at hand-to-hand combat. 
  • She is a very important member of Justice League. Even led it. 
  • In Young Justice, Black Canary provides counseling to the team after tragedies.
  • She offered training to the girls she (they) has rescued.
  • here she is, holding her own against some Amazons. (AMAZONS, PEOPLE.) 


  • And here she is kicking some *** because why not? 
  • She doesn’t take shit from anyone. And i mean ANYONE.
  • Remember when Superman&Batman&Wonder Woman had secret meetings and tried to lead the league behind her back? NAH-UH.
  • WHAT DID SHE DO? THAT.
  • “In our line of work, asking a favor means asking someone to put their life on the line. Dinah Lance, The Black Canary, doesn’t even hesitate one moment.”
  • “Why should i fear you?” 

“Because i fight like a girl.”


To summarize, Dinah Lance is a very powerful, strong, caring, kind, badass, amazing, talented, smart woman who deserves to be loved and appreciated way more. 

justice league: the male gaze at work

So, I saw Justice League this afternoon, and I could get into an examination of the issues that have been discussed in numerous critical reviews already – shoddy CGI, thin plot, forgettable villain, not enough time to get to know characters that haven’t been previously introduced before throwing them onto a team – but that would just be a retread. Instead, I want to focus my post-movie thoughts on one aspect in particular: the obvious presence of the male gaze.

The male gaze in superhero film, in film in general, is nothing new; because the majority of movies have been, and are still, directed by men, this is something that has been around since the dawn of cinema. It’s so ubiquitous, in fact, that the average moviegoer thinks nothing of it. Having the camera linger on a woman’s butt or breasts is just accepted, and a woman’s… woman-ness is commonly the primary attribute of her character.

I’m not here to claim that I’ve made some profound observation about the way that women are typically treated in film for the first time. I’m here to talk about how coming on the heels of this year’s Wonder Woman (directed by Patty Jenkins), the contrast is stark.

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me: *is reminded that the one and only michael lee brown could very well make his debut as evan hansen on broadway sometime this week*

me: i would like to thank not only the broadway gods but also the Universe