rick kane

Rick Riordan won a Stonewall award today

for his second Magnus Chase book, due to the inclusion of the character Alex Fierro who is gender fluid. This was the speech he gave, and it really distills why I love this author and his works so much, and why I will always recommend his works to anyone and everyone.

“Thank you for inviting me here today. As I told the Stonewall Award Committee, this is an honor both humbling and unexpected.

So, what is an old cis straight white male doing up here? Where did I get the nerve to write Alex Fierro, a transgender, gender fluid child of Loki in The Hammer of Thor, and why should I get cookies for that?

These are all fair and valid questions, which I have been asking myself a lot.

I think, to support young LGBTQ readers, the most important thing publishing can do is to publish and promote more stories by LGBTQ authors, authentic experiences by authentic voices. We have to keep pushing for this. The Stonewall committee’s work is a critical part of that effort. I can only accept the Stonewall Award in the sense that I accept a call to action – firstly, to do more myself to read and promote books by LGBTQ authors.

But also, it’s a call to do better in my own writing. As one of my genderqueer readers told me recently, “Hey, thanks for Alex. You didn’t do a terrible job!” I thought: Yes! Not doing a terrible job was my goal!

As important as it is to offer authentic voices and empower authors and role models from within LGBTQ community, it’s is also important that LGBTQ kids see themselves reflected and valued in the larger world of mass media, including my books. I know this because my non-heteronormative readers tell me so. They actively lobby to see characters like themselves in my books. They like the universe I’ve created. They want to be part of it. They deserve that opportunity. It’s important that I, as a mainstream author, say, “I see you. You matter. Your life experience may not be like mine, but it is no less valid and no less real. I will do whatever I can to understand and accurately include you in my stories, in my world. I will not erase you.”

People all over the political spectrum often ask me, “Why can’t you just stay silent on these issues? Just don’t include LGBTQ material and everybody will be happy.” This assumes that silence is the natural neutral position. But silence is not neutral. It’s an active choice. Silence is great when you are listening. Silence is not so great when you are using it to ignore or exclude.

But that’s all macro, ‘big picture’ stuff. Yes, I think the principles are important. Yes, in the abstract, I feel an obligation to write the world as I see it: beautiful because of its variations. Where I can’t draw on personal experience, I listen, I read a lot – in particular I want to credit Beyond Magenta and Gender Outlaws for helping me understand more about the perspective of my character Alex Fierro – and I trust that much of the human experience is universal. You can’t go too far wrong if you use empathy as your lens. But the reason I wrote Alex Fierro, or Nico di Angelo, or any of my characters, is much more personal.

I was a teacher for many years, in public and private school, California and Texas. During those years, I taught all kinds of kids. I want them all to know that I see them. They matter. I write characters to honor my students, and to make up for what I wished I could have done for them in the classroom.

I think about my former student Adrian (a pseudonym), back in the 90s in San Francisco. Adrian used the pronouns he and him, so I will call him that, but I suspect Adrian might have had more freedom and more options as to how he self-identified in school were he growing up today. His peers, his teachers, his family all understood that Adrian was female, despite his birth designation. Since kindergarten, he had self-selected to be among the girls – socially, athletically, academically. He was one of our girls. And although he got support and acceptance at the school, I don’t know that I helped him as much as I could, or that I tried to understand his needs and his journey. At that time in my life, I didn’t have the experience, the vocabulary, or frankly the emotional capacity to have that conversation. When we broke into social skills groups, for instance, boys apart from girls, he came into my group with the boys, I think because he felt it was required, but I feel like I missed the opportunity to sit with him and ask him what he wanted. And to assure him it was okay, whichever choice he made. I learned more from Adrian than I taught him. Twenty years later, Alex Fierro is for Adrian.

I think about Jane (pseudonym), another one of my students who was a straight cis-female with two fantastic moms. Again, for LGBTQ families, San Francisco was a pretty good place to live in the 90s, but as we know, prejudice has no geographical border. You cannot build a wall high enough to keep it out. I know Jane got flack about her family. I did what I could to support her, but I don’t think I did enough. I remember the day Jane’s drama class was happening in my classroom. The teacher was new – our first African American male teacher, which we were all really excited about – and this was only his third week. I was sitting at my desk, grading papers, while the teacher did a free association exercise. One of his examples was ‘fruit – gay.’ I think he did it because he thought it would be funny to middle schoolers. After the class, I asked to see the teacher one on one. I asked him to be aware of what he was saying and how that might be hurtful. I know. Me, a white guy, lecturing this Black teacher about hurtful words. He got defensive and quit, because he said he could not promise to not use that language again. At the time, I felt like I needed to do something, to stand up especially for Jane and her family. But did I make things better handling it as I did? I think I missed an opportunity to open a dialogue about how different people experience hurtful labels. Emmie and Josephine and their daughter Georgina, the family I introduce in The Dark Prophecy, are for Jane.

I think about Amy, and Mark, and Nicholas … All former students who have come out as gay since I taught them in middle school. All have gone on to have successful careers and happy families. When I taught them, I knew they were different. Their struggles were greater, their perspectives more divergent than some of my other students. I tried to provide a safe space for them, to model respect, but in retrospect I don’t think I supported them as well as I could have, or reached out as much as they might have needed. I was too busy preparing lessons on Shakespeare or adjectives, and not focusing enough on my students’ emotional health. Adjectives were a lot easier for me to reconcile than feelings. Would they have felt comfortable coming out earlier than college or high school if they had found more support in middle school? Would they have wanted to? I don’t know. But I don’t think they felt it was a safe option, which leaves me thinking that I did not do enough for them at that critical middle school time. I do not want any kid to feel alone, invisible, misunderstood. Nico di Angelo is for Amy, and Mark and Nicholas.

I am trying to do more. Percy Jackson started as a way to empower kids, in particular my son, who had learning differences. As my platform grew, I felt obliged to use it to empower all kids who are struggling through middle school for whatever reason. I don’t always do enough. I don’t always get it right. Good intentions are wonderful things, but at the end of a manuscript, the text has to stand on its own. What I meant ceases to matter. Kids just see what I wrote. But I have to keep trying. My kids are counting on me.

So thank you, above all, to my former students who taught me. Alex Fierro is for you.

To you, I pledge myself to do better – to apologize when I screw up, to learn from my mistakes, to be there for LGBTQ youth and make sure they know that in my books, they are included. They matter. I am going to stop talking now, but I promise you I won’t stop listening.”

Rick Riordan is such an underrated author

He is literally an author that give Tumblr diversity in popular books and yet it go mostly ignored. He has featured:

-Interracial couples

-Bisexual characters

-Gay characters

-Gay POC

-Pansexual characters

-Gender fluid characters

-Characters with disabilities (mental and physical)

-Asexual characters

-Children from abusive homes

-Characters with PTSD

-Characters with depression

-Representation of different cultures and religions

-Homeless teens

-Talks about racism 

-Talks about the horrible nature of parents kicking out their non-hetero-normative children

-Talks about abusive parents in general

-Talks about the importance of religion to someone’s beliefs

-Talks about how family is important

-Talks about how you are not your family

-Talks about how you can make your own family from the friends that support you

That is probably not every single one but thost are the ones I can think of off the top of my head. Rick Riordan makes these concepts important in his books and honestly makes the more complicated ones easy to understand. I know some may consider his books a bit more childish but it’s important to show young readers the different types of people in the world. It’s important to show them that heroes can come in every type of person. 

So stop sleeping on him

  • Rick Riordan, writing PJO: OK, no gay. Just a little diversity.
  • Rick Riordan, writing KC: Diversity!
  • Rick Riordan, writing HOO: Little bit of gay. Hella diverse.
  • Rick Riordan, writing TOA: Bisexual protagonist! Gay main couple!
  • Rick Riordan, writing MCGA: Pansexual Protagonist! Transgender main character! Muslim main character!
  • <p> <b>My future child:</b> why is my cousin's name rose?<p/><b>Me:</b> because your aunt loves roses<p/><b>My future child:</b> then where'd you get my name from?<p/><b>Me:</b> I'm busy now, The Range Of Diversity In Rick Riordan's Books<p/></p>
Who has the most dangerous Girlfriend/boyfriend?
  • Percy: Annabeth judo-flipped me once and tried to kill me a few times.
  • Carter: Well, Zia once tried to set me on fire.
  • Will: Nico can summon zombies. I think I win.
  • Magnus: Alex cut my head off once.
  • Others: *stunned silence*
  • Magnus: I win, bitches.
Riordan dudes react to Tumblr!
  • Jason: Hmph, seems neat. Lots of people love us. What do you guys think?
  • Percy: Nice choice of color for the site if I do say so myself! What about you, guys!
  • Magnus: *In embarrassed tone* Man, these guys are nuts, thinking me & Alex are a thing! That bone-headed, lifeless, green-haired, peppermint-smelling, beautiful-eyed, completely perfect angel of...THIS WEBSITE'S COLOR SUCKS!!!
  • Carter: *In frustrated tone* Wow, I'm about as noticed here as I am in real life. What about you, Nico?
  • *Nico has a smile covering over his face, blushing*
  • Nico: *Whispering* solangelo

Rick Riordan books all exist in the same universe…just think about that for a second. How much chaos can possibly exist at the same time in this one universe? Both Kane Chronicles and Percy Jackson take place around the same time, then Heroes of Olympus and Magnus Chase are very close together on the timeline. Trials of Apollo comes right after. Did gods from all these cultures conspire and say “Hey, let’s just continuously fuck up the world for a few years.” I can’t handle this. 

Let’s all be so thankful that Rick Riordan worked so hard to change his straight white boy™ story to a diverse cast of LGBT+ people and people of color and presenting it to a young audience. Thank you Rick, you made my coming out so much easier through your efforts. (Also no offense to the first few Percy Jackson books, I love them so much and the fact they make learning problems into a hero complex, I just love the cast of the later books so damn much)

friendly reminders that
  • frank is lactose intolerant
  • hazel doesn’t know what a chicken nugget is
  • nico literally had a nightmare about popcorn. popcorn
  • carter kane essentially did the same thing for zia rashid that leo did for calypso. keep that in mind.
  • bianca willingly left nico twice in both life and death, once to join the hunters and then to be reborn
  • percy can’t control the mist. thalia and hazel can.
  • jason hadn’t seen his mother since he was two years old
  • paul is an example of a good stepparent. annabeth’s stepmother is an example of a bad stepparent
  • magnus’s mom had a pixie cut, like alex
  • hazel likes to draw
  • nico likes card games which is a 100% guarantee he is a total nerd for magic the gathering, dungeons and dragons, etc. as well as probably video games and star wars and star trek
  • sadie is dating both anubis and walt
  • dead moms club: nico, bianca, hazel, leo, frank, jason, hedge
  • yes, coach hedge’s mother is dead.
  • piper is a vegetarian
  • pretty much all of frank’s family (except ares, obviously) is dead or presumed dead.
  • jason is near-sighted
  • alex does pottery
  • the titan and giant wars are just two of the wars chiron has been around to see. and he has been around since the original ancient greece.
  • percy is going to be an older brother
  • piper’s dad is famous. so she probably kind of is too, at least to some degree.
  • the three roman emperors that have come back to life are part of the group that has been terrorizing percy and the gang since the beginning
  • grover exists. he’s a member of the council of cloven elders. he and juniper are dating. in case you forgot. (i know rick did…)
  • tyson and ella are dating (also, tyson!!!)
  • rick riordan himself is a character within the series (royal scribe at camp half-blood, receiver of carter and sadie’s recordings, percy’s editor)
  • also, he wrote each book each year (sometimes two in a year). this guy deserves waaaay more credit than he gets
  • anubis likes to chill in graveyards
  • and, finally, may castellan is probably still making sandwiches and baking cookies for a son who will never come
Things Rick Riordan has included in his books:

1 - POC (Frank Zhang, Hazel Levesque, Piper Mclean, Carter/Sadie Kane, Zia Rashid, Samirah al-Abbas, etc.)

2 - Continued calling out of rape culture & misogyny

3 - Racial profiling and how it affects people

4 - Genderfluid/trans representation

5 - Gay representation

6 - Bi representation

7 - Arguably, pan representation

8 - The way homeless people are treated by society

9 - Religious people that are open-minded and respect others beliefs

10 - Atheists that respect others beliefs and don’t hate on religion for no apparent reason

11 - Said religious people and atheists being friends

12 - Erasure of biracial people and their identity

13 -  Biracial people not always looking like the caramel skin, green eyes etc. stereotype

14 - Cop violence

15 - Deaf representation (Hearthstone)

16 - actual gay couples instead of just token characters?

17 - kids with ADHD

18 - kids with dyslexia 

19 - the continued refusal to accept the “beauty or brains” nonsense

20 - Arguably, he calls out internalized misogyny

21 - the idea that arranged marriages are not always detrimental or unloving

22 - muslim representation

basically you should love rick riordan and read everything that he writes

feel free to add to this list

I just like that the Percy Jackson fandom is like the hufflepuff of fandoms:

  • People who don’t know about it think it’s silly 
  • We care a lot about diversity 
  • It’s lowkey gigantic, but feels small
  • Everyone from all the other fandoms is welcome 
  • Full of really nice and hilarious people 
  • We’re just happy to be included tbh
I just realized

The PJO series was written mainly written so that Rick Riordan’s son would have a fictional character who could represent him. And, considering that, it just makes sense that Rick Riordan would be passionate about diversity and representation, and expand to other issues, including lgbt and race issues.

The whole point of these books is representation for kids that can’t conform to the norms. And, yeah, sometimes he messes up. But, he learns, and he tries very hard, and that’s something I really appreciate

Information I learned from the Rick Riordan Hammer of Thor book tour

• The Trials of Apollo series will be at least 5 books

• The Magnus Chase series will be at least 3 books

• We will get to meet Percy’s little sister at one point in the Trials of Apollo series

• He had no control over the Percy Jackson movies whatsoever

• There will be a PJO coloring book released in August 2017

• There will be a book called Camp Half Blood Confidential released in May 2017. This book will be about life at camp

• He said he encourages fan art and fan videos

• He said if you write fanfiction to go for it but he does not read it

• He said probably his two favorite characters to write from are Sadie Kane and Apollo

• Someone asked if liked Anubis or Walt better with Sadie and he said both

• He said that by the end of The Hammer of Thor half of us are going to want the next book and half of us are going to want to kill him

• There will be new characters in The Hammer of Thor

• He will always write for the middle grade age group but he loves it when older people keep reading the books as well