rich jewel tones

Blue Skies

A/N: Happy Birth @snogfairy! I know I missed it last year but look!! I made something! Fantasy and everything <3

Avian!AU

Pairing: Nalu, Fairy tail

Words: 4506

Rating: T

Part: Oneshot (Angst) (Fluff)

Lucy loved flying.

She loved the feel of air whipping through her hair, of the strain on her back muscles as she rose herself high enough to find a current she could rest on, the crisp scent of pure oxygen that swirled above the clouds.

He favourite part of flying, however, had less to do with the act itself and more with the company.

“Bet I could reach that cloud that looks like an upside down cat first!” Natsu called, wings beating steady and strong as he held his position beside her. His wings were coloured like flames, yellows and oranges shimmering in the down of his feathers and close to the arch of bone that structured them, reds a rich jewel tone at the tips of his feathers with blacks and greys scattered along the outer layers like hidden shadows in the forest they played in.

“And what do I get if I win?” Lucy asked, grinning at her best friend’s challenge. While Natsu may be fast, Lucy was faster, not weighed down by a seven-foot wingspan and coiled muscles. Lucy’s wings were much more modest in length, only six feet across, but she knew they were beautiful in a way that was unmatched in her hometown. They were pure white with a soft golden undertone from the down feathers, silver tips of her outer feathers reflecting light and creating a glow that surrounded her like a halo in the moonlight.

Or at least that’s what Natsu had told her that one night they had stolen a bottle of strawberry mead from the guild kitchen and had picnicked along the edge of the lake under the light of the stars.

“I’ll fix all damaged boards and doors in your roost, but when I win you hafta cook for me for a week!” Natsu crowed, circling Lucy in an effort to expel his growing restless energy.

“My roost is damaged because you keep crash landing in it,” Lucy pointed out sourly, following Natsu’s movements as she kept her face towards him as she talked. “I mean I leave the window open every night, how you keep overestimating your landing is beyond me.”

“So you do leave it open for me,” Natsu leered, rising slightly so he could look down at Lucy. She felt heat crawl along her neck and she pouted at being caught. Stupid boy.

“Go!” Lucy shouted instead, allowing herself to drop slightly into the current below them and get a quick boost as she shot towards the cloud Natsu had pointed at.

“Cheater!” Natsu howled, following quickly on her heels. Lucy kept her arms close to her sides, laughing as Natsu cursed her loudly, voice barely carrying through the air rushing past them, words lost to the wind. Time blurred as they raced, Lucy’s heart pounding and sweat starting to bead on her temples and hairline, whipped away before she could fully register their creation. Lucy saw Natsu start to crawl into her peripheral, his eyes glinting with competitive joy and challenge. She swore under her breath, pushing herself to beat harder and cut through the air before her, weaving through different air currents and timing her beats of her wings for the most energy gained, every decision made in a millisecond through reflex alone.

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anonymous asked:

Hi, I'm planning to do a gerudo dress link from breath of the wild and I'm stuck on what fabric to use. I was thinking a cotton sateen because of the nice jewel tones, but wasn't sure if it would be too stiff to get the flowy desert feel of the costume. Do you have any ideas/recommendations? Thank you very much!!

Hello there!

For this, I’d recommend something with a soft hand that is semi-sheer rather than a cotton staeen. If you go with natural fibers and are willing to do some dyeing yourself, you can get the rich jewel tones without having to worry about what colors the fabric is actually manufactured in. If you line the top, you won’t have to worry about anything showing through while still getting the look of the soft material.

My first pick would be gauze or something in that family. Here’s a cotton gauze and here’s a rayon gauze; both would have to be dyed, which I would recommend fiber reactive dyes for. Another option would be this gorgeous silk/rayon blend, which would be dyed with a combination of acid and fiber reactive dyes, or with a ‘universal’ dye like Rit or iDye, and is more opaque than my other recommendations here. Cotton lawn or harem cloth might be good if you want a slightly more homespun look. For a much more sheer look (this is what I used for my pants for Harle), a silk organza would be lovely, but getting a bit far from the reference.

Other fabric types to look for: georgette (I’d recommend silk or rayon to keep yourself cool), silk chiffon in a higher mm (so that it’s more opaque and heavier than a more sheer poly or nylon chiffon), or if you can find a linen with a soft hand. A lightweight crepe could be another option, as could a jersey knit (which seems out of step with the world of the game but it would be a good look and is easily accessible, as a lot of these fabric types can’t exactly be found at Joann’s and have to be ordered online).

For this project, you want something that is soft and flowy and doesn’t have a whole lot of structure so that you can get the billowy look. I’m also sticking to mostly natural fibers because of the desert environment, but if you don’t mind polyester versions of these trapping heat (except the organza, which tends to be too stiff when in polyester form), then those might be easier to find. Keep in mind your method for adding the designs, as well – if you embroider, bead, or applique, fabric type can be pretty much anything, but if you want to paint or stencil, it may be better to go with something with a smooth surface rather than twisted yarns (like a crepe or georgette) so that you can get crisper lines.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Blue Skies (pt 2)

A/N; PSYCHE

y’all thought I’d leave you with that angst?? psssh, no way! Have some fluff to soothe over those broken hearts, and I hope this makes up @snogfairy <3 so do I get to keep hearting lol?

Second ending begins after the break, or ctrl-f ‘I love you’.

Natsu asks Lucy on a picnic and emotions are revealed. Two endings. Avian AU. 

Pairing: Nalu, Fairy tail

Words: 4864

Rating: T

Part: Oneshot (Angst) (Fluff)

Lucy loved flying.

She loved the feel of air whipping through her hair, of the strain on her back muscles as she rose herself high enough to find a current she could rest on, the crisp scent of pure oxygen that swirled above the clouds.

He favourite part of flying, however, had less to do with the act itself and more with the company.

“Bet I could reach that cloud that looks like an upside down cat first!” Natsu called, wings beating steady and strong as he held his position beside her. His wings were coloured like flames, yellows and oranges shimmering in the down of his feathers and close to the arch of bone that structured them, reds a rich jewel tone at the tips of his feathers with blacks and greys scattered along the outer layers like hidden shadows in the forest they played in.

“And what do I get if I win?” Lucy asked, grinning at her best friend’s challenge. While Natsu may be fast, Lucy was faster, not weighed down by a seven-foot wingspan and coiled muscles. Lucy’s wings were much more modest in length, only six feet across, but she knew they were beautiful in a way that was unmatched in her hometown. They were pure white with a soft golden undertone from the down feathers, silver tips of her outer feathers reflecting light and creating a glow that surrounded her like a halo in the moonlight.

Or at least that’s what Natsu had told her that one night they had stolen a bottle of strawberry mead from the guild kitchen and had picnicked along the edge of the lake under the light of the stars.

“I’ll fix all damaged boards and doors in your roost, but when I win you hafta cook for me for a week!” Natsu crowed, circling Lucy in an effort to expel his growing restless energy.

“My roost is damaged because you keep crash landing in it,” Lucy pointed out sourly, following Natsu’s movements as she kept her face towards him as she talked. “I mean I leave the window open every night, how you keep overestimating your landing is beyond me.”

“So you do leave it open for me,” Natsu leered, rising slightly so he could look down at Lucy. She felt heat crawl along her neck and she pouted at being caught. Stupid boy.

“Go!” Lucy shouted instead, allowing herself to drop slightly into the current below them and get a quick boost as she shot towards the cloud Natsu had pointed at.

“Cheater!” Natsu howled, following quickly on her heels. Lucy kept her arms close to her sides, laughing as Natsu cursed her loudly, voice barely carrying through the air rushing past them, words lost to the wind. Time blurred as they raced, Lucy’s heart pounding and sweat starting to bead on her temples and hairline, whipped away before she could fully register their creation. Lucy saw Natsu start to crawl into her peripheral, his eyes glinting with competitive joy and challenge. She swore under her breath, pushing herself to beat harder and cut through the air before her, weaving through different air currents and timing her beats of her wings for the most energy gained, every decision made in a millisecond through reflex alone.

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another dimension with(out) you ; 2.5k, g, sana/eva & other stuff

there are so many other ways this could have gone. a series of other universes occurring at the same time as ‘let’s go b*tches’. [there’s no cursing in this, for those trying to avoid that for ramadhan!] ao3

eva flops back against sana’s unmade bed, long copper hair splaying out against the mustard yellow bedspread. “sa-na,” eva whines, emphatically. “you’re a genius. stop already.”

sana looks over from her desk with amusement, and eva meets her gaze upside down, her face painted with an overblown pout. despacito is playing from eva’s phone next to her head, because sana had refused to let her play it through her speakers. eva has the worst taste in music, and when sana tells her so, she replies, i make up for it with my taste in girls, and something warm and lovely curls in the base of sana’s stomach.

“please?” eva tries again, hopefully.

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Vogue: On the Road with Best Friends Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss

Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss have forged the kinds of careers—and the kind of friendship—that people dream about.

One of the first things Taylor Swift did after moving from Nashville to her sprawling two-story penthouse in New York’s Tribeca was cover a wall of her den with framed, blown-up Polaroids of the most important people in her life. “This is when me and Karlie first met,” she says, pointing to a picture of her grinning and hugging model Karlie Kloss backstage at the 2013 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, where Kloss walked the runway in pink underwear and giant psychedelic wings and Swift performed with Fall Out Boy. The caption, handwritten in Sharpie, reads BEST FRIENDS FOREVER VS2013 and feels rather prescient given how close the two have become over the past year or so, with a road trip to Big Sur (dreamily documented on Instagram), restaurant outings, shopping excursions, sleepovers, texting marathons, ModelFit and SoulCycle sessions, and a second joint VS outing late last year in London, where, as the pair walked side by side down the runway in black lace, they exchanged “Can you believe this?!” grins—two friends on top of the world.

Lena Dunham and Cara Delevingne also make the Polaroid wall, as does Swift’s younger brother, Austin, 22, a senior at Notre Dame, standing next to his sister in the matching red plaid adult onesies she bought for her family last Christmas. A Polaroid captioned squirrel invasion documents the first time Swift met Lorde (whom Swift calls by her given name, Ella), as the two set out for dinner at Shake Shack in Madison Square Park only to be attacked by rodents. “We were taking these photos, and all of a sudden, like in a horror movie, there were squirrels sitting on our shoulders trying to eat our food,” says Swift, reenacting the moment. “Perched, like parrots! They’re like, ‘We deserve French fries, and we’re going to take them from you.’ ”

Swift click-clacks through her kitchen to her living room in black stiletto Louboutins, plops down on a burnt-orange velvet sofa, wiggles into a slouch, and props those heels up on a tufted brown-leather ottoman. Everything in the apartment is rendered in velvet, leather, and wood in dark, rich earth and jewel tones, from her rosewood Steinway grand piano to her pool table (where VS models Behati Prinsloo and Lily Aldridge apparently proved themselves to be quite the sharks when they came over earlier in the week).

It’s two days before her twenty-fifth birthday, and Swift is brimming with the confidence of a young woman who’s come into her own. It’s been quite a year: She not only moved to New York, away from her family; she’s also taken risks with her sound, stepping back from the world of country to embrace the throwback purity of eighties pop—with amazing success. “Blank Space,” a defiant (and impossible-not-to-sing-along-to) response to the media’s depiction of her as a crazed man-eater, enjoyed a seven-week run atop the Billboard Hot 100. Swift also became the first female in the chart’s 56-year history to replace herself at No. 1 (her earlier single was the now-ubiquitous “Shake It Off”). Both are from her remarkable new album,1989, named after the year she was born, which has sold more than six million copies and become, along the way, the fastest-moving rec­ord of the past decade. Saturday Night Live, meanwhile, aired a parody commercial for Swiftamine, a drug to treat the epidemic of vertigo in adults who suddenly realize how much they love Taylor Swift. “People are finally starting to discuss her artistry—how she’s on the level of some of the great all-time songwriters,” says Jack Antonoff of the band fun., who’s co-written several songs with Swift and likens her deeply personal storytelling to new chapters of a book the whole world wants to read. “The other day my grandmother was asking me about1989. We’re all talking about it. In my lifetime, I haven’t experienced that since Michael Jackson—that one artist who stands above and unites us all.”

Swift has also remixed her personal life. For starters, the once-hopeless romantic who laid her emotions bare in songs about whirlwind love affairs and their aftermaths, like “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” (reportedly about Jake Gyllenhaal) or “I Knew You Were Trouble” and1989’s “Out of the Woods” (reportedly about Harry Styles), is pushing back at critics who have dismissed her as boy-obsessed. The tongue-in-cheek “Blank Space” video shows her stabbing a heart-shaped cake with a butcher’s knife, setting a boyfriend’s clothes on fire, and taking a golf club to his gorgeous silver sports car. Kloss, Dunham, and Delevingne, meanwhile, are part of a close-knit group of powerful women friends that Swift has been building over the past few years. Members also include Selena Gomez, whom Swift has known since they were both teenagers dating Jonas brothers; Jaime King, a kind of Earth Mother figure; and the Haim sisters, whom she met last fall. Devoting this much time to her female friendships started out as a reaction, Swift says, “to the way people were overreacting to my life. I was really irritated by the whole serial-dater play that people tried to make about me.”

She responded by pulling the plug on her love life. “I just decided I wasn’t willing to provide them that kind of entertainment anymore,” she says. “I wasn’t going to go out on dates and have them be allowed to take pictures and say whatever they wanted about our body language. I wasn’t going to sit next to somebody and flirt with them for five minutes, because I know the next day he’ll be rumored to be my boyfriend. I just kind of took the narrative back. It’s unfortunate I had to do that. And it’s unfortunate that now I have this feeling like if I were to open myself up to love, that would be a career weakness.” Instead, Swift is emerging as a powerful figure for teenage girls and young women—someone who takes to task critics and bullies and, yes, men who’ve wronged her, and provides a shining example of a woman shaping her own destiny.

“This last year has felt very different than any other year of my life,” Swift tells me. “I’ve felt more settled and unapologetic about who I am and what I stand for. I think that might be one of those symptoms of growing up and becoming your own person, and depending less on other people’s opinions of you. I just hope that keeps going—because I’m liking it.”

Swift is describing her philosophy about making friends—basically, wear ’em down till they like you—when Kloss sweeps into the apartment, a six-foot-one beam of sunshine. Though Swift and Kloss have known each other for only a year, their best-friendship, they tell me, was instantaneous. They’re a striking pair, particularly now that Kloss’s formerly tawny hair is blonde. “When I did SNL they both came, and at the after-party it was so confusing to everyone, like these Amazon twins,” says Dunham. “Taylor’s so tall, Karlie’s even taller, and together it’s just surreal.”

If Swift wears heels and Kloss wears flats, they’re the same height. But today, Kloss has messed up the equation by wearing skintight Tamara Mellon leather leggings with boots attached. “All-in-one, baby,” she says, showing them off as she walks the floor bearing a tin of her gluten- and dairy-free Karlie’s Kookies, from her collaboration with Milk Bar.

“They’re kind of the greatest thing I’ve ever seen,” Swift gushes. “You look like Catwoman!” Kloss says they’re custom-made, but she can hook Swift up with a pair. “They’re pretty good,” says Kloss, “but I can’t take them back to St. Louis. When I go home, if I have even an ounce of New York attitude, my family’s like, ‘Nope, nope.’ They don’t let it happen.” “They’re like, ‘You with your shoe pants, you leave those outside!’” says Swift, laughing. “You put on some real pants!”

Though Kloss seems to have a keen awareness of every stitch of fashion she has on her body, when I ask Swift who made her black knit tank dress, she has no idea.

Kloss notices the dress, too. “What is this? Alaïa?”

Swift turns to me for help. “I don’t know—do I have a tag in there?” she asks, lifting up her fluffy fair hair and leaning her back toward me. rvn, the tag reads. “My stylist put it in my closet,” she says, burying her face in her hands.

Somehow, though, despite their differing levels of fashion expertise, they often tend to dress the same. “The other night I came over,” says Kloss, “and we were both going someplace from here, and we were both wearing black crop tops and high-waisted skirts. It’s kind of getting weird.”

“Black tights, hair done the same way,” says Swift. “Just like, ‘Ugh, be more annoying.’ We couldn’t possibly be.

“People had been telling us for years we needed to meet,” she adds. “I remember makeup artists and hair people going, ‘Doesn’t she remind you of Karlie? God, she and Karlie would be best friends. They’re the same. Karlie’s such a good girl. She brings us cookies every time we do a shoot.’ ”

“Still do,” says Kloss. As a teen she made them from scratch. Now she makes them professionally—Karlie’s Kookies raises money for charities like FEED, Hurricane Sandy relief, and the CFDA. In addition to the baking venture, Kloss has studied at Harvard Business School (her boyfriend of two years, Joshua Kushner, an early investor in Instagram who recently cofounded the health-care start-up Oscar, is an alumnus) and is now learning computer coding.

A mutual friend, Kloss’s fellow VS model Lily Aldridge, introduced her to Swift, “and we were just like, ‘You. My friend. Now,’ ” says Swift. A few months later they saw each other again at an Oscars after-party, and Kloss suggested they do something spontaneous. “I’d been to Big Sur once before, and I was like, ‘We should just do it,’ ” says Swift.

They walked beneath the redwoods, ran on the beach at sunset, took a picture hanging off the state-park sign with Kloss wearing Swift’s sweater, the front of which spelled out genius. “It’s ironic, clearly,” Swift is quick to add

When I ask what they bonded over, they shrug. “We’re both normal people,” says Kloss. “We’re real girls,” says Swift, who, as if on cue, drops part of the cookie she’s eating on her dress, picks it up, and eats it. “Five-second rule.”

Swift is, by all accounts, an amazing person to be friends with. She cooks, she bakes, she does the dishes; she’s a fantastic host, she gives great gifts. She has a collection of old-timey nightgowns that she and her friends wear while watching television and—technology aside—pretending they’re living in frontier days. (Swift, who shows me a picture on her phone of her, Cara Delevingne, and Kendall Jenner all lying in her bed looking like Little House on the Prairie, inspired Dunham to start her own collection.) Every hang, it seems, ends in a dance party in her kitchen. Dunham calls her “the Betty Crocker of friendships” and says she’s most impressed by how Swift always has time for the people she loves. “It’s amazing to have a friend who’s that busy and also so available,” says Dunham. “Even if she’s in Hong Kong on tour and I’m going through something, if I text her, I get an answer in two seconds. If something good happens to me—say, I get a nomination, or it’s my birthday, or the day before my birthday, or my book comes out—I get a text from Taylor way before I get a text from my mom.“

Some of Swift’s eagerness to make friends probably comes from her having felt like an outcast while growing up. “I have lots of issues from school,” she says. “You can tell, probably.” Essentially, she left the small Pennsylvania town where she was made fun of for her music and formed a close community where she’s now surrounded by people with similar talents and creative ambitions. It’s a kind of high school do-over in which she can join whatever clique she wants—or decide to abolish cliques altogether. When I ask Swift which metaphorical lunch table she sits at now, she immediately gets what I’m saying. “I want to make the table as big as possible, and I want everyone to sit with me,” she says.

The next day at Billboard’s Women in Music Awards luncheon (where Aretha Franklin sings her an impromptu “Happy Birthday” that Swift later tweets will take her decades to recover from), she sings along to every song, from performances to montages—she knows the words to everything. If female musicians are supposed to all be out for one another’s blood, it’s not happening on Swift’s watch.

Every kid in the room who comes up to her, meanwhile, gets not only a selfie but a conversation. “Little children! I must attend to them,” she says, apologizing for running off in the middle of a conversation. An eleven-year-old girl sheepishly tells Swift she’s from New Jersey. “I spent the summers going down to the Jersey Shore,” says Swift and poses for four apparently blurry selfies before gently taking the phone from the girl’s hand. “You’re really bad at this,” Swift jokes, taking the photo herself. The girl is going to be at Z100’s Jingle Ball concert, where Swift is the closing performer, that night. “I go on really late,” Swift warns her. “Do you drink coffee?” The girl says she drinks Frappuccinos. “OK,” says Swift, “drink a Frappuccino and you might be able to stay awake long enough to see me.”

“New York City, it’s good to be home! I’m Taylor,” says Swift. It’s shortly before midnight, and she’s standing onstage at Madison Square Garden addressing a screaming crowd of 17,000 as if she’s talking to one of her girlfriends on the phone. Dressed in red plaid high-waisted pants and a matching crop top, her hair feathered like Blondie-era Debbie Harry, she blazes through four hits before announcing that she has officially turned 25. “I know why you choose music—it’s because you want to escape from haters and frenemies,” Swift tells the crowd, instructing us to exchange nods of solidarity with our neighbors. “This is the last song of the night,” she continues. “No one’s gonna judge you for how you dance during this song. New York City, are you ready?” The place goes nuts.

Swift returns to her apartment well past midnight, orders sushi, and sets up a makeshift photo booth to host what seems like every famous person in music. She has invited all her fellow performers (Iggy Azalea, Charli XCX, Ariana Grande, Sam Smith, Nick Jonas), along with other friends ranging from Kloss to Abigail Anderson—Swift’s best friend since freshman year of high school in suburban Hendersonville, Tennessee—to Justin Timberlake and Jay Z and Beyoncé. “I have, like, 20 different people flying in,” Swift had told me the day before. “My friends are staying in every room.” Her mother, Andrea, however—who flew in from Nashville earlier laden with decorations now draped over mirrors and mantels, with every window in the place (I lose count at fifteen) garlanded as well—isn’t there. “I think a twenty-fifth birthday, no mother should be there,” Andrea told me. “You need to know when to step away.”

The next time I catch up with Swift, she’s still in her PJs at 11:15 on a perfect sunny January morning at her house in Beverly Hills. In the month since I saw her turn 25 she’s become the proud owner of a bejeweled necklace (a birthday gift from Dunham) bearing the image of her kitten Olivia; danced like crazy with Beyoncé and the Haim sisters at a Justin Timberlake concert in Brooklyn; bought the shirt off Hugh Jackman’s back (giving $6,000 to the Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS charity in the process) while seeing him perform on Broadway with her family; sent out a large batch of gift packages to her fans, one of which included a Swift painting of flowers and a check for $1,989 to help pay off a student loan; and rung in the New Year onstage in Times Square in front of a million people live and a billion more on TV and the Web. Since she’s been out West, though, she’s been doing what she can to catch up with friends, including “a lot of cooking nights,” hiking with Lorde, and wandering around Catalina Island eating ice cream with her girlfriends and her dad. When Lorde sounded stressed about going to the Golden Globes, Swift showed up in support wearing a bright-yellow dress (in honor of Lorde’s nominated song, “Yellow Flicker Beat”). “We just turned it into a girls’ night,” Swift says over the phone.

For both today and the foreseeable future, though, Swift is going to be all business getting ready for the 1989 world tour, which kicks off May 5 in Tokyo. There’s a set list to finalize, and wardrobe and production design to approve, and choreography to learn. She insists she’s not nearly as awkward a dancer as she pretends to be in the “Shake It Off” video: “If I get serious about choreography, I will learn it and I’ll do it correctly—most of the time,” she says.

Looking back on what’s been both a tumultuous and momentous time in her life, Swift says she and her family “had a lot of moments where we would look at each other and say, ‘Wow—I can’t believe people got it.’ You only hope for things like this.” She’s been trying to take it all as it comes. “I don’t get so caught up in the work that I don’t appreciate the crazy, incredible, astonishing, joyous success that’s happened,” she says. “Putting pressure on yourself is good, but putting unnecessary stress on yourself is bad—so I don’t worry that I haven’t started the next record yet. I don’t worry that I don’t know what it’s going to be. I’m not worried that I have absolutely no timetable as to when it needs to be done. It could be two years from now; it could be three, it could be four. Or it could be one. You get these bursts of inspiration right at the moment you’re not expecting to. You just have to live your life, and hopefully you’ll take the right risks.”

Kloss, for her part, has been maintaining the kind of schedule that would seem to require its own air-traffic controller. After a short break back home in St. Louis, she’s been back and forth to Paris twice in early January alone as part of her new job as a L’Oréal Paris spokesperson; to the Florida Keys for a Bruce Weber shoot; and to L.A. and Paris again for L’Oréal. Next up: back to L.A. for the Oscars before ramping up for Fashion Weeks in New York, Milan, and Paris. “In moderation it can be really fun,” says Kloss, who’s cut the 60 shows she used to walk at the start of her career down to a fraction of that. “For me, runway is an opportunity to perform.”

She’s also practically bursting to tell me some big news: She’s been accepted to NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. (NYU alum Christy Turlington Burns wrote her letter of recommendation.) “I was waiting for the mail to arrive every single day,” she says. “It’s something that I’ve wanted to do for a very long time.” Kloss doesn’t yet know what she’ll study; for now, she’s just excited to be taking classes. “I’ll still be working full-time,” she says. “I’m incredibly ambitious and have lots of goals within my career that I’m not slowing down on anytime soon.”

Swift says she and her friends don’t talk much about work. “The fun thing about my friends is that they don’t necessarily know a lot about what I do business-wise,” she says. The first time Kloss ever saw Swift pick up a guitar and noodle around on it was during the photo shoot for this story. “I’m not one of those singers who’s always like, ‘Look at me!’ ” says Swift. “I’m not the person who grabs the guitar at a party and wants all the attention. I have attention on me enough, so I want my friends to just like me because we have things in common rather than me sitting in a corner being like, ‘Listen to this song that I wrote about my life!’ ”

No matter how busy they are, though, Swift and Kloss continue to make time for each other. Swift recently had Kloss over to her place for a night of cooking pasta with model Martha Hunt, stylist Ashley Avignone, and Tavi Gevinson. A few days later that same group went to dinner at Ralph Lauren’s restaurant, the Polo Bar, in midtown. (“The French fries were delicious,” says Kloss.)

Kloss says that bringing together disparate women from different industries may be Swift’s most unsung talent. “I’ve met a lot of really great girls through Taylor. She’s incredible at connecting people who might not normally meet. We’re all in different jobs, but we’ve become strong friends who are there for each other—a sisterhood of girls, a support team. But we’re also just normal 20-something girls, and I think you have to have people that you can be that with. You know, real friends are hard to find—and Taylor’s a real friend. There’s nothing better.”

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Flowers

Drabble Games: Round 2

As requested by Anonymous.

Thorin x Reader: You were saturated sunlight.

Warnings: Possible secondhand embarrassment.

Word count: 771



Dis needed fabric.

Dis had also found her hands full with an infant son and his currently anxiety-ridden toddler brother who seems unable to handle separation from his mother just yet.

Thus Thorin had volunteered his services, however apprehensively, to retrieve the bolts she required from the market.

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the proposal;

@pillarofnohr :

A quiet stroll through Nohr’s most prolific garden - the picturesque end to their celebration of Kaze’s birthday after a day filled with family. They strolled hand in hand among the flowers. A sea of velvet-petaled darkness surrounded them on all sides, purples, reds, and blues matching the evening sky up above. Each breath in filled their lungs with floral aromas as delicate as the lace that adorned Nohr’s most elaborate ballgowns and as rich as their jewel-toned fabrics.

There was no place more beautiful within the palace grounds, but that was not why Xander had chosen this scenery to end their night.

“Do you remember when I first confessed my feelings to you? Two dozen roses hand-picked from this garden. I think those were the very same roses you handed back to me when you rejected my advances,” he murmured, pointing into the distance. A simple ruse for Kaze to turn his head away, allowing the prince to take a knee, his beloved’s hand still clasped in his own.

This was it. After so much preparation, so much heartache, so much debate and rationalization and fear they wouldn’t make it - this was the moment of truth. Taking a shaking breath, Xander began the second Kaze’s eyes were on him again. He hadn’t even started and he could feel his nerve starting to fail.

“I cannot tell you how grateful I am that you re-considered after that day. You have become my guiding star since then, more brilliant than Hoshido’s sun, and I would be lost without you. Please, agree to light my way for all the days to come. I want you to be the one at my side when I ascend to the throne. I want you to be the one I raise a family with. I want you to be the one who scolds me when I work too long, keeps me warm at night, and holds my hand just because we cannot stand that small space between us.”

Xander’s voice trembled and his throat seized up, clogged by emotion. Dammit.

“I-I had more of a romantic speech planned, but I fear I may not able to finish it. You’ll have to forgive me for losing my words this once.”

Coughing to disguise the tears threatening to break free, Xander drew forth the ring he’d had re-forged for the occasion and presented it to Kaze. It was a simple thing, a band of polished gold and a little filigree with a rainbow-filled diamond embedded in the center.

“This diamond was originally my mother’s - I stole her engagement ring years ago because I thought no one else deserved to have it after she passed. I was wrong. And I think I’ve finally found the person it belongs to.

“Suzukaze, love of my life, will you take my ring and with it be bound to me forever?”

How could he forget the day Xander had approached him on? How could he forget the gift that had changed the course of their lives: three white roses, to signify the shackles that bound Xander’s heart, and seven of each blue, violet, and maroon, representing the courage, respect, and unattainable desires Xander felt.

He remembered the surprise coloring Xander’s voice as he had realized that Kaze had discerned the meaning within. How an exploratory voice had asked Kaze if the arrangement was up to expectations– as if he were caught.

Ah, and Xander’s pain as Kaze had attempted to return six of them– it was not a memory that would pain Kaze until his dying day. How Xander had turned to hide tears and trembling lips; how words of self-hatred had snaked between clenched teeth.

“Of course. I could never forget,” he answered, allowing his gaze to be redirected out towards the fields. It never ceases to amaze how many there were– uncountable, no matter how many servants would be called to try. “It was the start of an incredible journey. Certainly not the easiest of all.”

The rustle of clothes forced Kaze’s attention to return to his partner; his eyes snapped to Xander, having to drop to meet Xander’s. It was then that he realized what exactly this was– how could this moment have sneaked up to surprise a ninja?

The proposal.

He found himself speechless as Xander spoke, building up to the fateful question. How Xander pledged to bind himself to this Hoshidan ninja for the rest of their lives– ah, and how emotions blocked the remainder of Xander’s words. Kaze could not hold back a voiceless chuckle, emotions heating his face. How like Xander.

The significance of this ring was insurmountable; no doubt it was one of Xander’s most precious belongings. It was an item Kaze had not even known the existence of. And it belonged to Kaze, now.

“Of course.”

He didn’t need to think; his answer came immediately, as if by instinct. “I will. I will guide you when the road seems to trail off. I will light every faint day and every dark night, as long you will have me by your side. I will be the father to the family we have started. I will be the one who scolds you when you must be my company in bed, and I will hold you whenever you need your anchor. I will.”

He spread his fingers, allowing Xander to complete the ceremony. He could not withhold the weight collecting in the corners of his eyes– it spilled, falling to the trodden earth.

“Ah… Xander, I’m so happy…” he muttered, pulling Xander up to his feet so that he could bury heated cheeks into his– ah, fiance’s chest. “You did so well… You’ll have to allow me to read the rest of your speech when we get back.”

Fall/Winter 2015 Trend Report.

Green

Fantastic and fresh, green symbolizes health and growth.

This year emerald green is on the fashion cards and a popular hue with the F/W2014 collections. The jewel-rich tone, although less intimidating than previous year’s shades, there is no stopping celebrities and top designers from incorporating the hue as a wardrobe staple. Enhancing our sense of well-being, this vivid, leafy green inspires insight and promotes balance and harmony. Associated with the precious gemstones, Emerald could be defined as sophisticated and luxurious.

Ann Demeulemeester, Berluti, Craig Green, Juun J, Raf Simons, Tim Coppens, Todd Lynn, Umit Benan, Walter Van Beirendonck and Yohji Yamamoto.

Tiffany Rose - Jewel Block Maxi Dress in Biscay Bluenew arrival

Irresistible rich jewel tones of dark teal, peacock and indigo blue for a wonderful evening

ABOUT ME
- jersey maternity maxi dress, deep v crossover neckline front and back, cap sleeves, elasticised empire line, detachable sash
- nursing friendly (no discreet layer)
- biscay blue

Spring/Summer 2015 Trend Report.
Green.


Fantastic and fresh, green symbolises health and growth.

Emerald green is on the fashion cards as the most popular hue with the S/S2015 collections. The jewel-rich tone, although less intimidating than previous year’s shades, there is no stopping for top designers from incorporating the hue as a wardrobe staple. Enhancing our sense of well-being, this vivid, leafy green inspires insight and promotes balance and harmony. Associated with the precious gemstones, Emerald could be defined as sophisticated and luxurious.

Asger Juel Larsen, Chanel, David Delfin, Dirk Bikkembergs, Dolce And Gabbana, Dsquared2, Prada, Roberto Cavalli, Topman Design and Walter Van Beirendonck.

"Dark as Snow" (Chapter 3)

Rating: M 
Words: 6,244
Summary: After years of isolation and loneliness, Anna sees her whirlwind marriage to the handsome widower Lord Hans Westergard as her long-awaited happily-ever-after. But her troubled relationship with her sister and her growing closeness to a gruff but kindhearted stablehand loom large, and her husband’s darkest secret behind an eternally-locked door threatens to destroy everything Anna holds dear. [AU of The Bloody Chamber]

[CHAPTER INDEX]

Notes: So after the darkness and angst of the first two chapters, this one is… definitely on the light side. Very light. We’re kind of undergoing something of a tonal shift as we move into the second act of the story. The real drama will happen when the first and second acts collide a few chapters from now. 

Until then, though, enjoy the happiness (and Kristoff and Anna being total dorks together).

Keep reading

10

On the Road with Best Friends Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss

Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss have forged the kinds of careers—and the kind of friendship—that people dream about.

One of the first things Taylor Swift did after moving from Nashville to her sprawling two-story penthouse in New York’s Tribeca was cover a wall of her den with framed, blown-up Polaroids of the most important people in her life. “This is when me and Karlie first met,” she says, pointing to a picture of her grinning and hugging model Karlie Kloss backstage at the 2013 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, where Kloss walked the runway in pink underwear and giant psychedelic wings and Swift performed with Fall Out Boy. The caption, handwritten in Sharpie, reads BEST FRIENDS FOREVER VS2013 and feels rather prescient given how close the two have become over the past year or so, with a road trip to Big Sur (dreamily documented on Instagram), restaurant outings, shopping excursions, sleepovers, texting marathons, ModelFit and SoulCycle sessions, and a second joint VS outing late last year in London, where, as the pair walked side by side down the runway in black lace, they exchanged “Can you believe this?!” grins—two friends on top of the world.

Lena Dunham and Cara Delevingne also make the Polaroid wall, as does Swift’s younger brother, Austin, 22, a senior at Notre Dame, standing next to his sister in the matching red plaid adult onesies she bought for her family last Christmas. A Polaroid captioned squirrel invasion documents the first time Swift met Lorde (whom Swift calls by her given name, Ella), as the two set out for dinner at Shake Shack in Madison Square Park only to be attacked by rodents. “We were taking these photos, and all of a sudden, like in a horror movie, there were squirrels sitting on our shoulders trying to eat our food,” says Swift, reenacting the moment. “Perched, like parrots! They’re like, ‘We deserve French fries, and we’re going to take them from you.’ ”

Swift click-clacks through her kitchen to her living room in black stiletto Louboutins, plops down on a burnt-orange velvet sofa, wiggles into a slouch, and props those heels up on a tufted brown-leather ottoman. Everything in the apartment is rendered in velvet, leather, and wood in dark, rich earth and jewel tones, from her rosewood Steinway grand piano to her pool table (where VS models Behati Prinsloo and Lily Aldridge apparently proved themselves to be quite the sharks when they came over earlier in the week).

It’s two days before her twenty-fifth birthday, and Swift is brimming with the confidence of a young woman who’s come into her own. It’s been quite a year: She not only moved to New York, away from her family; she’s also taken risks with her sound, stepping back from the world of country to embrace the throwback purity of eighties pop—with amazing success. “Blank Space,” a defiant (and impossible-not-to-sing-along-to) response to the media’s depiction of her as a crazed man-eater, enjoyed a seven-week run atop the Billboard Hot 100. Swift also became the first female in the chart’s 56-year history to replace herself at No. 1 (her earlier single was the now-ubiquitous “Shake It Off”). Both are from her remarkable new album, 1989, named after the year she was born, which has sold more than six million copies and become, along the way, the fastest-moving rec­ord of the past decade. Saturday Night Live, meanwhile, aired a parody commercial for Swiftamine, a drug to treat the epidemic of vertigo in adults who suddenly realize how much they love Taylor Swift. “People are finally starting to discuss her artistry—how she’s on the level of some of the great all-time songwriters,” says Jack Antonoff of the band fun., who’s co-written several songs with Swift and likens her deeply personal storytelling to new chapters of a book the whole world wants to read. “The other day my grandmother was asking me about 1989. We’re all talking about it. In my lifetime, I haven’t experienced that since Michael Jackson—that one artist who stands above and unites us all.”

Swift has also remixed her personal life. For starters, the once-hopeless romantic who laid her emotions bare in songs about whirlwind love affairs and their aftermaths, like “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” (reportedly about Jake Gyllenhaal) or “I Knew You Were Trouble” and 1989’s “Out of the Woods” (reportedly about Harry Styles), is pushing back at critics who have dismissed her as boy-obsessed. The tongue-in-cheek “Blank Space” video shows her stabbing a heart-shaped cake with a butcher’s knife, setting a boyfriend’s clothes on fire, and taking a golf club to his gorgeous silver sports car. Kloss, Dunham, and Delevingne, meanwhile, are part of a close-knit group of powerful women friends that Swift has been building over the past few years. Members also include Selena Gomez, whom Swift has known since they were both teenagers dating Jonas brothers; Jaime King, a kind of Earth Mother figure; and the Haim sisters, whom she met last fall. Devoting this much time to her female friendships started out as a reaction, Swift says, “to the way people were overreacting to my life. I was really irritated by the whole serial-dater play that people tried to make about me.”

She responded by pulling the plug on her love life. “I just decided I wasn’t willing to provide them that kind of entertainment anymore,” she says. “I wasn’t going to go out on dates and have them be allowed to take pictures and say whatever they wanted about our body language. I wasn’t going to sit next to somebody and flirt with them for five minutes, because I know the next day he’ll be rumored to be my boyfriend. I just kind of took the narrative back. It’s unfortunate I had to do that. And it’s unfortunate that now I have this feeling like if I were to open myself up to love, that would be a career weakness.” Instead, Swift is emerging as a powerful figure for teenage girls and young women—someone who takes to task critics and bullies and, yes, men who’ve wronged her, and provides a shining example of a woman shaping her own destiny.

“This last year has felt very different than any other year of my life,” Swift tells me. “I’ve felt more settled and unapologetic about who I am and what I stand for. I think that might be one of those symptoms of growing up and becoming your own person, and depending less on other people’s opinions of you. I just hope that keeps going—because I’m liking it.”

Swift is describing her philosophy about making friends—basically, wear ’em down till they like you—when Kloss sweeps into the apartment, a six-foot-one beam of sunshine. Though Swift and Kloss have known each other for only a year, their best-friendship, they tell me, was instantaneous. They’re a striking pair, particularly now that Kloss’s formerly tawny hair is blonde. “When I did SNL they both came, and at the after-party it was so confusing to everyone, like these Amazon twins,” says Dunham. “Taylor’s so tall, Karlie’s even taller, and together it’s just surreal.”

If Swift wears heels and Kloss wears flats, they’re the same height. But today, Kloss has messed up the equation by wearing skintight Tamara Mellon leather leggings with boots attached. “All-in-one, baby,” she says, showing them off as she walks the floor bearing a tin of her gluten- and dairy-free Karlie’s Kookies, from her collaboration with Milk Bar.

“They’re kind of the greatest thing I’ve ever seen,” Swift gushes. “You look like Catwoman!” Kloss says they’re custom-made, but she can hook Swift up with a pair. “They’re pretty good,” says Kloss, “but I can’t take them back to St. Louis. When I go home, if I have even an ounce of New York attitude, my family’s like, ‘Nope, nope.’ They don’t let it happen.” “They’re like, ‘You with your shoe pants, you leave those outside!’” says Swift, laughing. “You put on some real pants!”

Though Kloss seems to have a keen awareness of every stitch of fashion she has on her body, when I ask Swift who made her black knit tank dress, she has no idea.

Kloss notices the dress, too. “What is this? Alaïa?”

Swift turns to me for help. “I don’t know—do I have a tag in there?” she asks, lifting up her fluffy fair hair and leaning her back toward me. rvn, the tag reads. “My stylist put it in my closet,” she says, burying her face in her hands.

Somehow, though, despite their differing levels of fashion expertise, they often tend to dress the same. “The other night I came over,” says Kloss, “and we were both going someplace from here, and we were both wearing black crop tops and high-waisted skirts. It’s kind of getting weird.”

“Black tights, hair done the same way,” says Swift. “Just like, ‘Ugh, be more annoying.’ We couldn’t possibly be.

“People had been telling us for years we needed to meet,” she adds. “I remember makeup artists and hair people going, ‘Doesn’t she remind you of Karlie? God, she and Karlie would be best friends. They’re the same. Karlie’s such a good girl. She brings us cookies every time we do a shoot.’ ”

“Still do,” says Kloss. As a teen she made them from scratch. Now she makes them professionally—Karlie’s Kookies raises money for charities like FEED, Hurricane Sandy relief, and the CFDA. In addition to the baking venture, Kloss has studied at Harvard Business School (her boyfriend of two years, Joshua Kushner, an early investor in Instagram who recently cofounded the health-care start-up Oscar, is an alumnus) and is now learning computer coding.

A mutual friend, Kloss’s fellow VS model Lily Aldridge, introduced her to Swift, “and we were just like, ‘You. My friend. Now,’ ” says Swift. A few months later they saw each other again at an Oscars after-party, and Kloss suggested they do something spontaneous. “I’d been to Big Sur once before, and I was like, ‘We should just do it,’ ” says Swift.

They walked beneath the redwoods, ran on the beach at sunset, took a picture hanging off the state-park sign with Kloss wearing Swift’s sweater, the front of which spelled out genius. “It’s ironic, clearly,” Swift is quick to add.
When I ask what they bonded over, they shrug. “We’re both normal people,” says Kloss.

“We’re real girls,” says Swift, who, as if on cue, drops part of the cookie she’s eating on her dress, picks it up, and eats it. “Five-second rule.”

Swift is, by all accounts, an amazing person to be friends with. She cooks, she bakes, she does the dishes; she’s a fantastic host, she gives great gifts. She has a collection of old-timey nightgowns that she and her friends wear while watching television and—technology aside—pretending they’re living in frontier days. (Swift, who shows me a picture on her phone of her, Cara Delevingne, and Kendall Jenner all lying in her bed looking like Little House on the Prairie, inspired Dunham to start her own collection.) Every hang, it seems, ends in a dance party in her kitchen. Dunham calls her “the Betty Crocker of friendships” and says she’s most impressed by how Swift always has time for the people she loves. “It’s amazing to have a friend who’s that busy and also so available,” says Dunham. “Even if she’s in Hong Kong on tour and I’m going through something, if I text her, I get an answer in two seconds. If something good happens to me—say, I get a nomination, or it’s my birthday, or the day before my birthday, or my book comes out—I get a text from Taylor way before I get a text from my mom.”

Some of Swift’s eagerness to make friends probably comes from her having felt like an outcast while growing up. “I have lots of issues from school,” she says. “You can tell, probably.” Essentially, she left the small Pennsylvania town where she was made fun of for her music and formed a close community where she’s now surrounded by people with similar talents and creative ambitions. It’s a kind of high school do-over in which she can join whatever clique she wants—or decide to abolish cliques altogether. When I ask Swift which metaphorical lunch table she sits at now, she immediately gets what I’m saying. “I want to make the table as big as possible, and I want everyone to sit with me,” she says.

The next day at Billboard’s Women in Music Awards luncheon (where Aretha Franklin sings her an impromptu “Happy Birthday” that Swift later tweets will take her decades to recover from), she sings along to every song, from performances to montages—she knows the words to everything. If female musicians are supposed to all be out for one another’s blood, it’s not happening on Swift’s watch.

Every kid in the room who comes up to her, meanwhile, gets not only a selfie but a conversation. “Little children! I must attend to them,” she says, apologizing for running off in the middle of a conversation. An eleven-year-old girl sheepishly tells Swift she’s from New Jersey. “I spent the summers going down to the Jersey Shore,” says Swift and poses for four apparently blurry selfies before gently taking the phone from the girl’s hand. “You’re really bad at this,” Swift jokes, taking the photo herself. The girl is going to be at Z100’s Jingle Ball concert, where Swift is the closing performer, that night. “I go on really late,” Swift warns her. “Do you drink coffee?” The girl says she drinks Frappuccinos. “OK,” says Swift, “drink a Frappuccino and you might be able to stay awake long enough to see me.”

“New York City, it’s good to be home! I’m Taylor,” says Swift. It’s shortly before midnight, and she’s standing onstage at Madison Square Garden addressing a screaming crowd of 17,000 as if she’s talking to one of her girlfriends on the phone. Dressed in red plaid high-waisted pants and a matching crop top, her hair feathered like Blondie-era Debbie Harry, she blazes through four hits before announcing that she has officially turned 25. “I know why you choose music—it’s because you want to escape from haters and frenemies,” Swift tells the crowd, instructing us to exchange nods of solidarity with our neighbors. “This is the last song of the night,” she continues. “No one’s gonna judge you for how you dance during this song. New York City, are you ready?” The place goes nuts.

Swift returns to her apartment well past midnight, orders sushi, and sets up a makeshift photo booth to host what seems like every famous person in music. She has invited all her fellow performers (Iggy Azalea, Charli XCX, Ariana Grande, Sam Smith, Nick Jonas), along with other friends ranging from Kloss to Abigail Anderson—Swift’s best friend since freshman year of high school in suburban Hendersonville, Tennessee—to Justin Timberlake and Jay Z and Beyoncé. “I have, like, 20 different people flying in,” Swift had told me the day before. “My friends are staying in every room.” Her mother, Andrea, however—who flew in from Nashville earlier laden with decorations now draped over mirrors and mantels, with every window in the place (I lose count at fifteen) garlanded as well—isn’t there. “I think a twenty-fifth birthday, no mother should be there,” Andrea told me. “You need to know when to step away.”

The next time I catch up with Swift, she’s still in her PJs at 11:15 on a perfect sunny January morning at her house in Beverly Hills. In the month since I saw her turn 25 she’s become the proud owner of a bejeweled necklace (a birthday gift from Dunham) bearing the image of her kitten Olivia; danced like crazy with Beyoncé and the Haim sisters at a Justin Timberlake concert in Brooklyn; bought the shirt off Hugh Jackman’s back (giving $6,000 to the Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS charity in the process) while seeing him perform on Broadway with her family; sent out a large batch of gift packages to her fans, one of which included a Swift painting of flowers and a check for $1,989 to help pay off a student loan; and rung in the New Year onstage in Times Square in front of a million people live and a billion more on TV and the Web. Since she’s been out West, though, she’s been doing what she can to catch up with friends, including “a lot of cooking nights,” hiking with Lorde, and wandering around Catalina Island eating ice cream with her girlfriends and her dad. When Lorde sounded stressed about going to the Golden Globes, Swift showed up in support wearing a bright-yellow dress (in honor of Lorde’s nominated song, “Yellow Flicker Beat”). “We just turned it into a girls’ night,” Swift says over the phone.

For both today and the foreseeable future, though, Swift is going to be all business getting ready for the 1989 world tour, which kicks off May 5 in Tokyo. There’s a set list to finalize, and wardrobe and production design to approve, and choreography to learn. She insists she’s not nearly as awkward a dancer as she pretends to be in the “Shake It Off” video: “If I get serious about choreography, I will learn it and I’ll do it correctly—most of the time,” she says.

Looking back on what’s been both a tumultuous and momentous time in her life, Swift says she and her family “had a lot of moments where we would look at each other and say, ‘Wow—I can’t believe people got it.’ You only hope for things like this.” She’s been trying to take it all as it comes. “I don’t get so caught up in the work that I don’t appreciate the crazy, incredible, astonishing, joyous success that’s happened,” she says. “Putting pressure on yourself is good, but putting unnecessary stress on yourself is bad—so I don’t worry that I haven’t started the next record yet. I don’t worry that I don’t know what it’s going to be. I’m not worried that I have absolutely no timetable as to when it needs to be done. It could be two years from now; it could be three, it could be four. Or it could be one. You get these bursts of inspiration right at the moment you’re not expecting to. You just have to live your life, and hopefully you’ll take the right risks.”

Kloss, for her part, has been maintaining the kind of schedule that would seem to require its own air-traffic controller. After a short break back home in St. Louis, she’s been back and forth to Paris twice in early January alone as part of her new job as a L’Oréal Paris spokesperson; to the Florida Keys for a Bruce Weber shoot; and to L.A. and Paris again for L’Oréal. Next up: back to L.A. for the Oscars before ramping up for Fashion Weeks in New York, Milan, and Paris. “In moderation it can be really fun,” says Kloss, who’s cut the 60 shows she used to walk at the start of her career down to a fraction of that. “For me, runway is an opportunity to perform.”

She’s also practically bursting to tell me some big news: She’s been accepted to NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. (NYU alum Christy Turlington Burns wrote her letter of recommendation.) “I was waiting for the mail to arrive every single day,” she says. “It’s something that I’ve wanted to do for a very long time.” Kloss doesn’t yet know what she’ll study; for now, she’s just excited to be taking classes. “I’ll still be working full-time,” she says. “I’m incredibly ambitious and have lots of goals within my career that I’m not slowing down on anytime soon.”

Swift says she and her friends don’t talk much about work. “The fun thing about my friends is that they don’t necessarily know a lot about what I do business-wise,” she says. The first time Kloss ever saw Swift pick up a guitar and noodle around on it was during the photo shoot for this story. “I’m not one of those singers who’s always like, ‘Look at me!’ ” says Swift. “I’m not the person who grabs the guitar at a party and wants all the attention. I have attention on me enough, so I want my friends to just like me because we have things in common rather than me sitting in a corner being like, ‘Listen to this song that I wrote about my life!’ ”

No matter how busy they are, though, Swift and Kloss continue to make time for each other. Swift recently had Kloss over to her place for a night of cooking pasta with model Martha Hunt, stylist Ashley Avignone, and Tavi Gevinson. A few days later that same group went to dinner at Ralph Lauren’s restaurant, the Polo Bar, in midtown. (“The French fries were delicious,” says Kloss.)

Kloss says that bringing together disparate women from different industries may be Swift’s most unsung talent. “I’ve met a lot of really great girls through Taylor. She’s incredible at connecting people who might not normally meet. We’re all in different jobs, but we’ve become strong friends who are there for each other—a sisterhood of girls, a support team. But we’re also just normal 20-something girls, and I think you have to have people that you can be that with. You know, real friends are hard to find—and Taylor’s a real friend. There’s nothing better.”