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With a gun-toting Harriet Tubman, ‘Underground’ is the perfect ode to revolutionary women

  • Underground, the television drama about runaway slaves on a quest for freedom in 1857, wasted no time in showing audiences that their preconceived notions about Harriet Tubman were all wrong.
  • For years, on-screen portrayals of the civil rights hero have been relegated to educational cartoons for kids and sanitized TV movies that portray her as “juvenile and one-dimensional,” writes Kate Clifford Lawson, the author of Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman — Portrait of an American Hero, at Entertainment Weekly
  • Think Cicely Tyson’s 1978 portrayal of the famed abolitionist in A Woman Called Moses, where Tubman spends half her time on screen in tears, praying for strength as she shuffles behind white abolitionists.
  • But Underground, which debuted its second season on WGN Wednesday night, turns that portrayal of female revolutionaries like Tubman upside down. Read more (3/9/17 3:55 PM)

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“The Battalion of Death (Battalion Malatesta) was an Italian anarchist unit during the Spanish Civil War. The battalion was formed by a few hundred Italian anarchist exiles in France.  It was organized and funded by Diego Abad de Santillan and commanded by the Italian Camillo Berneri.

Late March 1937, the battalion made ​​its debut parading through the Paseo de Gracia and the Plaza Catalunya in Barcelona wearing their smart uniforms and brandishing the slogan “without God nor master”. It made quite an impression on the audience.

They wore black turtleneck jerseys, olive-green uniforms with ammunition belts and a black beret with a skull and a dagger badge. The battalion consisted of both men and women.” 

Ce sont les enfants sages, Madame, qui font les révolutionnaires les plus terribles. Ils ne disent rien, ils ne se cachent pas sous la table, ils ne mangent qu'un bonbon à la fois, mais plus tard ils le font payer cher à la société. Méfiez-vous des enfants sages.
—  Jean-Paul Sartre

“First of all, we say primarily that the priority of this struggle is class. That Marx, and Lenin, and Che Guevara, and Mao Tse-Tung, and anybody else that has ever said or knew or practiced anything about revolution, always said that revolution is a class struggle. It is one class, the oppressed, against the other class - the oppressor. And it’s got to be a universal fact. Those that don’t admit to that are those that don’t want to get involved in a revolution, because they know that as long as they’re dealing with a race thing, they’ll never be involved in a revolution. They can talk about numbers; they can hang you up in many, many ways, but as soon as you start talking about class, then you got to start talking about some guns. And that’s what the Party had to do.”

- Fred Hampton, Chicago chair of the Black Panther Party, 1968

Via Haroon Kavanoor