reuters photography

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The Scratched Lens: Photographing Syria: Bassam Khabieh

Reuters Slideshow: http://www.reuters.com/news/picture/photographing-syria-bassam-khabieh?articleId=USRTSAIOA

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A Venezuelan protester poses for a portrait at Altamira square in Caracas.

Estos son los estudiantes, que sin armas, protestan en Altamira, municipio Chacao, contra el gobierno de Nicolás Maduro, Jóvenes que luchan y arriesgan sus vidas por un país mejor. Ellos son a quienes Maduro acusa de violentos y de atacar a los funcionarios de la fuerza pública.

“Le voy a dar unas horas apenas a los ‘chuckies’ , a los asesinos, que tienen tomada la plaza Altamira y la avenida Francisco de Miranda y si no se retiran voy a ir a liberar esos espacios con la fuerza pública”, dijo este sábado el presidente Nicolás Maduro en un acto con militares.

Y estos son los muchachos “armados” de coraje, y que podemos ver en estas fotos de Jorge Silva, de la agencia Reuters.

 

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Venezuela’s shield-bearing protesters

Venezuelan protesters blocked streets on Saturday, July 29, in a last-ditch effort to derail the election of a legislative superbody that opponents of President Nicolas Maduro say will give the Socialist leader a stranglehold on power.

The oil-rich but recession-racked country has been gripped by four months of protests against Maduro that have left more than 110 dead in confrontations against security forces, who have responded with tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons.

Ahead of Sunday’s election, here’s a look at Venezuela’s young protesters, who, drawing inspiration from Ukraine’s 2013-14 revolt, don Viking-like shields in battles with security. (Reuters)

Photography by Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Twitter and Tumblr.

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield and a knife poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 27, 2017. He said: “I protest because the situation is very tough and we are going hungry. We really need a change.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 17, 2017. He said: “I protest for freedom. I fight for freedom of speech.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield that reads “Miraflores on fire,” poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 24, 2017. She said: “I’m protesting because Venezuela is beautiful and it’s sad that everyone has to go. I fight because I don’t want to leave Venezuela, I want to grow here.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield and a tennis racket poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 27, 2017. He said: “I protest for the future of my country.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 27, 2017. He said: “I protest, because I want a better future for me and my family, because it hurts to get up every day and have my mother crying because there is nothing to eat at home. Because I know that if I’ve got to die here, I would die fighting for my country and not because I was shot by someone who wanted to steal my cell phone.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield, poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 27, 2017. He said: “I protest for my future, for the future of my country and so I can wake up tomorrow without any fighting or dictatorship”. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 17, 2017. He said: “I protest because before we had it all and now we have nothing. Because today we have to wake up very early to queue to be able to buy food. I live in a slum and we have lots of needs, we are going hungry.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a satellite TV antenna used as a shield poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 27, 2017. He said: “I protest for my country… we are the resistance and we are fighting for the world to understand that we live in a dictatorship. I fight for the beautiful Venezuela.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 17, 2017. He said: “I protest for a better future for my daughter and for a better Venezuela.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield that reads “A benediction for the students”, poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 24, 2017. He said: “I am in the streets resisting because in this country we are living in a dictatorship and we want to have a better future for our children. Because food is not available, there are no jobs, no production of anything, we have high cost of living and insecurity.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield that reads “Promise me you will come back tomorrow. Venezuela”, poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 17, 2017. He said: “I protest for a better Venezuela, so that we can study, so that our children have a better future and for the freedom of everybody. Because we live in a dictatorship.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield that reads “Aim to the”, poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 17, 2017. He said: “I protest to have a better Venezuela… Because today most of the young people graduate and have no chance of fulfilling their goals in the country. Venezuelans don’t want any more dictatorship or repression, we want freedom.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela May 27, 2017. He said: “I protest because my brother no longer lives here in Venezuela. My father has cancer and I can’t find his medicines… my mother is retired and the money is not even enough for food… we need to change this situation in Venezuela.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield that reads “No. Dictatorship. 350”, poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 17, 2017. He said: “I protest for the freedom of the country.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A demonstrator holding a rudimentary shield poses for a picture before a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, May 27, 2017. He said: “I protest for freedom. I’m 18 and I’m not to be blamed for this, I never voted for Chavez or Maduro. I want to know that I can study and that I can aspire to something better. This regime has robbed us of everything, robbed us of the quality of life and opportunities, so that we have nothing more to do than be here to defend our rights.” (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

6

Depopulation turns Serbia’s villages into ghost towns

Repusnica was once a bustling village on the slopes of Mount Stara Planina in Serbia. Now its bars lie empty, its houses stand shuttered and nobody walks its streets.

Authorities declared the village near the border with Bulgaria closed in 1998 due to depopulation caused by mechanization of the economy, the closure of state factories and an exodus from Serbia linked to the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

In many nearby villages, the population has dwindled and sometimes just an elderly couple or a single person is left. Schools, clinics, veterinary stations and shops are closed. Visitors are rare. Roads are peppered with potholes.

“Some people left, moved away … to seek better living standards. The village was neglected and ignored especially when it came to infrastructure,” said Rade Bogdanovic, a retired veterinarian in Kalna, which is part of the Knjazevac municipality that also includes Repusnica.

“Only the elderly stayed behind, the parents of those who left, and over time they grew older and died,” he said as he stumbled across rubble to reach his dilapidated former office. He said Kalna’s population had shrunk from 4,000 to 1,000.

Between 2002 and 2011, Serbia lost more than 377,000 people or 5 percent of its population of around 7 million, according to the census. Numbers have fallen in 86 percent of the country’s 4,600 villages, according to the Serbian Academy of Science. A similar situation exists in some other countries in the Balkans and southeastern Europe.

In the past 50 years the eastern Serbian municipality of Knjazevac fell by half to 30,000 people.
“We now have a population in line with what we had after World War One,” said Marija Jelenkovic, a municipal official.

In the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s around a million left to seek jobs in the West. An estimated 700,000 people left Serbia during the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

The outflow continued after the fall of President Slobodan Milosevic in 2000. A transition to a market economy saw many state factories close and a trend towards smaller families has seen the average age rise to 42 according to the 2011 census, up from 40 in 2002.

The Serbian government has sought to tackle the problem by improving infrastructure and offering incentives to younger people to stay in villages. The effort is yet to yield results.

In 2015, a human rights official appointed by parliament said the country should ask migrants flooding through the Balkans from the Middle East to settle in empty villages but the idea was abandoned. (Reuters)

Photography by Marko Djurica/Reuters

See more photos of Depopulation turns Serbia’s villages into ghost towns and our other slideshows on Yahoo News.

4

Refugees (2015)

top left: Arriving on Lesbos
Migrants arrive on a Turkish boat near the village of Skala, on the Greek island of Lesbos, Nov. 16, 2015. The Turkish boat owner delivered some 150 people to the Greek coast and tried to escape back to Turkey; he was arrested in Turkish waters.
by Sergey Ponomarev

bottom left: Struggling to exit a dinghy
A Syrian refugee holds on to his children as he struggles to walk off a dinghy on the Greek island of Lesbos, after crossing the Aegean Sea from Turkey, Sept. 24, 2015.
by Yannis Behrakis

top right: Kissing his daughter
A Syrian refugee kisses his daughter as he walks through a rainstorm toward Greece’s border with Macedonia, near the Greek village of Idomeni, Sept. 10, 2015.
by Yannis Behrakis

bottom right: Pleading for passage
Migrants and refugees beg Macedonian policemen to allow passage to cross the border from Greece into Macedonia during a rainstorm, near the Greek village of Idomeni, Sept. 10, 2015.
by Yannis Behrakis