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Yerkes Observations, 1918 Solar Eclipse Expedition (part II)

1. Prominences around the sun taken with the 61.5-foot coelostat telescope at Green River, Wyoming. Photographed on the Yerkes Observatory expedition to Wyoming to record the total solar eclipse of June 8, 1918.

2. Corona of the sun taken through clouds with a 61.5-foot coelostat telescope using a 6-inch lens. Photographed on the Yerkes Observatory expedition to Wyoming to record the total solar eclipse of June 8, 1918.

3. Corona of the sun (1 second exposure). Photographed on the Yerkes Observatory expedition to Colorado to record the total solar eclipse of June 8, 1918.

Ernie Sisto (NY Times), Rare views of solar eclipse, 30/06/1954, Flying as a pool photographer with the American Airlines - Hayden Planetarium Eclipse Expedition, United States. Vintage silver print (Press Photo)

Here are two phases of rarely seen phenomena that occur during a total eclipse as seen from 13,000 feet this morning above Rupert House, James Bay, Canada. At top are Bailey’s Beads, when the light of the sun peeps through periphery “diamond ring” effect at end of totality.

David Gill, Comet 1882 II, 13 November 1882.

Comet 1882 II was even brighter than Comet 1881 Tebbutt III, so much so that its first sighting was then it was visible to the naked eye. Her Majesty’s Astronomer at the Cape, David Gill, reported watching the comet rise a few minutes before the Sun on the 18th of September, 1882q “The nucleus was then undoubtedly single, and certainly rether under than over 4″ in diameterq in fact, as I have described it, it resembledd very much a star of the 1st magnitude seen by daylight”. It was David Gill who took photographs of this comet during October and November, which were the best taken to date of any comet.

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Yerkes Observatory, Halley’s comet, 1910.

1. Yerkes Observatory, Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c).

2. Edward Emerson Barnard, Drawing (photograph copy) of the tail of Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c), by Edward Emerson Barnard, made the morning of May 19, 1910.

3. Mary Ross Calvert, Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c), showing division in the end of the tail.

4. Oliver Justin Lee, Halley’s comet (1P/1909 R1 1910 II 1909c), head and nucleus. Photographed with the 24-inch reflector telescope  (1 h 35 m exposure).