responsible child

anonymous asked:

okay but South Park literally wouldn't work as live action. Animation allows them to do things that wouldn't be funny because it looked unrealistic in live action. And, it's 100% the parents responsibility to ensure their child isn't watching inappropriate stuff (I understand this is hard but also for things like South Park not really). Also it (I'm rlly a fan but my roommate watches so I know a bit) doesn't teach that people who stand for anything are pretentious, many times it conveys that 1/2

They didn’t send the second part because I executed them for war crimes before they could finish.

Responses to childhood trauma.

Our therapist mentioned a while back that there are common responses to childhood trauma.  The obvious ones being fight or flight. But she said three others were freeze, submit and attach.

I don’t think I understood at the time but looking at my system now I can see examples of all of these responses in system members.

They’re pretty self explanatory I guess but I just wanted to share this for reference if anyone finds it helpful, like I have.  I think these are even more relevant in dissociative disorders such as DID because there are often conflicting feelings towards abusers - we are often attached to them despite their abuse.  For us that has been one of the most grueling things to admit.

I know freeze is very common, in later trauma/abuse as well as child abuse. It often happens when fight/flight can’t happen and is when a child will become silent and still, anything to avoid drawing the attention of their abuser. It comes with a sense of powerlessness.

If the freeze response doesn’t work, the child can “submit” by going along with whatever the abuser is doing, in the hope that if they comply it will be over quicker/they won’t be punished. This can be seen in animals - they “play dead” and hope for the attacker to leave them. Submit parts often feel a great deal of shame and take on the blame/responsibility for what has happened.

It is apparently common to have alters who represent these trauma responses within the same system. I can now see all of the responses in our system, for example, fight presents in hypervigilant alters such as protectors, flight can be seen in those alters who distance themselves from external people to avoid being hurt, freeze is obvious in very scared/traumatised/often younger alters who can be stuck in the trauma, submit parts can feel shame or appear needy, whereas attached parts have a fear of being abandoned/always try to be better.

I’m not sure if this will help anyone but it helped us to figure out why certain alters act in a particular way/believe particular things.

I have heard from a lot of survivors who are, understandably, confused about how responsible their parents are for the abuse because they were also abused by their parents. So let me clarify…

They are 100% responsible. Abuse is 100% wrong and it is 100% their responsibility that they are doing it. Just as it will be 100% wrong and your responsibility if you do it to your children.

It is the abusive parent’s duty to deal with their emotional wounds so that they do not abuse you. Repeatedly saying, “sorry, I was abused too,” is not good enough. They need to change their behavior and not abuse you anymore. That is the only thing that means anything. Bringing up past abuse instead of being accountable and changing their behavior is just another way of manipulating you into accepting the abuse. Maybe you are underage and cannot yet stop them from abusing you, but you can at least know in your mind that it is not acceptable behavior, that they are at fault and responsible for their abuse of you.

Anyways

@ ace teens: you are wonderful and valid.

You aren’t sexualizing yourself by calling yourself ace.

You aren’t sexualizing other teens by calling yourself ace.

You aren’t being homophobic by calling yourself ace.

If you feel like ace works for you, use it.

It doesn’t matter if it doesn’t fit later on or others think you’re too young or whatever.

Only you have the ability to label yourself, and whatever label you choose is totally valid.

UPDATE: if u wanna talk about this personal vent that blew up send me a message, i’m not answering the anons lol. i know there are autistic people that disagree but this is directed specifically at allistic people that participate in ableism and yet do the whole meme thing and that it made me and yes, many others uncomfortable. particularly as many of the joke posts start with someone not understanding why the joke is funny, etc. if you’re not autistic however literally you can like not even interact with this post like i really do not care.


like i get the Joke or whatever but i’m here to be that annoying reminder that autism exists and all of you are complicit in ableism re: the babadook 

the movie is… pretty…clearly about ableism? her son is autistic- that’s why he’s bullied, that’s why he has meltdowns and sensory issues and doesn’t pick up on social cues, that’s why he’s ‘annoying’, that’s why her sister just Hates him- and she’s your typical autism mom. she takes it all out on her son, she hates that she gave birth to a child that was fucked up and Wrong and lost her husband in the process, she doesn’t have enough ‘support’, nobody understands, etc. he’s annoying and loud and complicated and she hates him the way some of you in the audience did. 

the babadook is her hatred of him, her inability to accept his autism, etc. that’s why she tries to kill him(the way so many autism moms do, the way autism speaks tries defend), that’s why she tries to physically abuse it out of him, that’s why she has to ‘feed the monster’ every so often (the way autism moms™ have their ‘mom days’ to complain about how much they can’t stand their kid, how sometimes they wish they’d never been born, how they consider drowning them in kiddie pools bc it’d be ‘kinder’, the way that famous anti-vaxxers report having to go stand in rooms and throw shit at walls to avoid hitting their kid)

it’s…really apparent to me as an autistic person and it is so many others, too? sam has to protect his mother from the babadook. he’s terrified of it (her)- the movie even makes clear that she was the one that wrote the book. she tries to kill both herself and sam (glass in the food). she becomes more and more unstable, aggressive, and violent, and sam’s response as an autistic child is to mirror what he sees. his meltdowns increase, he has less support, he spends all his time latching on to the remnants of the only person he has. 

like it’s…idk, really uncomfortable for me to see all these allistic people first making fun of how annoying the (autistic) kid was, and misinterpreting the movie to a frankly astounding degree, and then the Joke is that straight people don’t get how he’s a ~gay icon~ (which… many of the people in the first few posts from which the meme comes were autistic…. )

idk. it’s really weird for me to see allistics carry on with this elaborate lgbt icon joke by laughing in the faces of people that don’t understand why, when half of us are autistic… being mocked for not understanding a movie…about ableism…by allistic people. the mind boggles. 

i mean whatever its a joke gay babadook etc but y’all didn’t even get it the first time and you’re joyfully, self-assuredly ableist all the time so it’s really weird that this is just kind of drowning out all of the #actuallyautistic posts i was enjoying reading in the tag but i mean, allistics will be allistics, i guess 

  • abuser: insults you constantly, calls you slurs, uses your entire existence as a joke, minimizes your pain and treats you like you have no feelings or worth, uses force and guilt and threats to control you, invades your privacy and sabotages your education/career and personal life, causes you permanent mental illness and trauma, forces you to live your life like less than a human being
  • abuser: still insists that only thing that matters about all of this is their good intentions. still, even after all this, you are not human enough for your entire life experience to matter, only thing that can possibly matter is how the abuser feels about abusing you, how they experienced it, what if it wasn't feeling good enough for them? what if they now need to get rid of any leftover bit of guilt? what if now they need you to not blame them so they wouldn't have to face what they've done? poor soul why not focus more on them and their issues?
3

When baby Yuzu gets to talk about his favourite jumps, he automatically turns back into the child he is inside :D

I just love to see how excited he is just mentioning the jump and how that reflects his passion for skating. I really like PJ Kwong short interviews with him because though they’re in English, he seems very comfortable around her and shows a little bit more of his casualness and positive energy that usually aren’t there when he’s answering in English.

After the Parade

“Hush,” he says.

Above them, Cabal ships drag thick black smoke across the flickering twilight, and flames rise from the Tower. Legionnaires scour the streets, seeking out the cries of the wounded and afraid.

“Hush,” he says again, as the child starts to sniffle, and he pulls her into the shadows cast by an apartment block as a patrol makes its laborious way past. He was made to protect, made to serve, but he feels clumsy now; the hand on her shoulder is almost larger than her head and she has no armor to protect her bruised and burned skin from his rough gauntlets. When he tries to wipe the tears from her face he worries that he will be the one to break her.

He followed her screams, just as the Cabal did. He had no rifle to kill the Legionnaires that would have silenced her; dispatched the first one with his boot-knife but was not quick enough to catch the second unaware. It is dead, but his chest-plate is cracked and burned and the thing that eats the Traveler has also eaten his Light.

She is wearing yellow. A summer dress, for a celebration. When he offered her his gore-spattered hand she took it at once, and did not look back at the splayed and broken limbs visible beneath the rubble around her as though she knew there was no one left to wait for. He brushed dust and chips of concrete from the tight black curls on her head, and when she tried to smile her gap-toothed smile at him despite it all he knew that he would die the second death to save her.

They pick their way through dust-covered streets and alleys, one grimy hand holding his armored fingers, the other wrapped around the silent shell of his Ghost. He told her to keep it safe, and she clutches it to her chest with an intensity that would do any Titan proud.

To those behind the Wall, love and service. To those outside it, fury and fire. He is young: the Order’s maxim has never meant much to him, but here at the end of an Age he feels each word burning in his chest and he wraps his Mark around her shoulders like a cloak, like a little Hunter, to keep the nearness of the night from her as best he can.

When they hear the distant bursts of gunfire he waits until the chatter fades, then leads them in a different direction even though it gives him hope to know the City is still fighting. Perhaps if he ran to the violence he would find weapons or more Guardians, but he will not risk it. And so hours pass as they slink across the city, and as slowly as his wounds force him to move she still takes ten strides for every one of his. She has only one sandal, silver leather wrapped around a tiny leg, but he thinks that a single piece of armor is better than no armor at all.

He finds a battered pulse rifle in a street that leads to a square, tries not to wonder where its owner went. The magazine is full, but it is all he has and there is no Ghost at his shoulder to synthesize ammo. He bends to pick it up, never letting go of the hand that holds his own, just as a troop of Legionnaires turn the corner in front of them.

He pulls the child behind a crumbled wall. Waits one heartbeat, two; no slug throwers roar in response. Even so, they are between him and the direction he has lead, and he doubts he has the strength to cross the City again.

Love and service to those within. Fire and fury to those without.

The Legionnaires do not notice, but neither do they move on. More join them, and they begin to spiral out in all directions, continuing their search. It will not be long before they find him and the child. A narrow street, once hung with banners but now collapsing from the rooftops down, will lead her west, to the walls, away from Cabal patrols - as long as there is a distraction.

He lifts her chin as gently as he can.

“You have to run,” he whispers. He is bad at whispering. “I’ll keep you safe.”

“That way,” he says when she stares at him in silence, pointing with his outsized hand down the shadowed street.

He gives her a delicate push, points again. She blinks, once, then toddles into the dark, Ghost held close as though it will protect her. Perhaps, if there is a way to undo this disaster, it someday will.

He props the rifle atop the ledge, lifts his visor and sights with naked eye. There are so many, he thinks, and then bites back a laugh - there are only eight.

Love within. Fury without.

The rifle barks. One Legionnaire dies and the others spin in confusion, firing in the direction of his cover. He ignores them, squeezes the trigger again. And again. And again.

Love within. Fury without. Love within. Fury without. Love within. Fury without. Love within -

Something tugs his arm. He looks down into the eyes of the little girl, and pure terror finds him.

“I said run,” he growls, but she does not, her face set in a scowl. He shakes his arm and she does not let go.

A micro-rocket bursts against the barricade and he ducks, throws his body over her, sprays the rest of his bullets in response. The child buries her head in his cracked armor, her frail body shaking.

Never has he been so afraid to die.

He feels a fool. He tosses the rifle down, wraps one arm around the child and pulls her close. With the other he slams his visor shut. He takes a deep breath, and then another, and when at last there is a break in the constant fire he lurches to his feet, lifts the child to his chest, and runs.

It is hard, so hard, to move full Titan-plate without his Light to drive it. His body aches. Something inside is probably broken, and he does not know how long it takes a body to heal without a Ghost.

A slug hits him in the back and he stumbles but his armor holds, and he sprints down the street where he tried to send the child, the sound of jump-packs following behind. He ducks his head and cups himself around his charge, makes himself as big as he can, plows across the debris-choked pavement. The girl begins to cry again, though to his ears it is not the sound of fear but of fury, and before long he is roaring with it, and the two of them roar together down the long, narrow street as explosions scatter bits of ruins that once were homes. He does not know where he is going, knows only that he must go somewhere, that he will not stop until the child is safe or his legs no longer work; that when he has nothing left he will throw her from him and tear the Cabal apart with fists alone, Light or no.

He has stopped counting the impacts. Every step is a knife in his chest. The Legionnaires must be close but he does not turn, lest the shield that is his body fail. He can feel himself slowing, a sensation that fills him both with wonder and despair, but he cannot force himself to let her go despite his promise. Something cracks against the back of his leg, and he is too tired and too hurt to correct. He lands heavily on one shoulder, slides ten grinding yards, arms still wrapped around the child. At the very least, they will have to rip him apart to get to her. Maybe, if he dies quickly, they will not notice her at all.

Gunfire interrupts his thoughts, along with the sound of footsteps and the roar of Cabal. Hands grab him, drag him out of the street, but still he does not uncurl. He sees Hunter cloaks, Warlock robes, a Titan mark.

“Hush,” he tells the child, head still tucked close, while they cower in a doorway and around them Guardians fight.

“Hush,” he tells her, over their surprised cries of pain.

“Hush,” he tells her, over and over, until at last all is silent and he dares to lift his head and stand.

He helps the child to her feet, and though he leans against the doorway it is her tiny hand in his that keeps him upright. He looks around at their saviors: most are near as bruised as he is. They nod their heads, pat him on the back, and he opens his mouth to ask for forgiveness, for leading the Legionnaires here, but a Hunter shakes her head as though she knows what he will say.

Two Guardians lie dead. Truly dead. One Hunter, one Titan wearing the Mark of the Gatewatch. He waits the half-second for their Ghosts to revive them, feels sick when they do not rise. He swears that he will learn their names and add them to the Order of the Pilgrim Guard.

Someone makes cooing sounds and tries to take the child, tries to give her water, but she refuses to let go of his hand, refuses to surrender his Ghost. For a moment they stand there, all seven of them in a circle around her, and it is as though a different light has risen to bond them all.

They need ships. Weapons. Food, maybe. The child, at least, must eat. The Hunter offers water again, and he wonders how many new scraps of fabric she has taken for her cloak. A different Titan, this one wearing the Mark of the Six Fronts, hands him the dead Hunter’s rifle - then looks down at the child, still clinging to his hand, and passes him a sidearm instead.

They turn their backs to the Tower, and continue their slow march to the western wall. Perhaps they will find supplies along the way. If not, so be it - they are still Guardians, and they will save what light they can.

Love within. Fury without.

The Cabal have no word for ‘retreat.’ Soon, they will learn that the Guardians have none for ‘mercy.’


Words: @themothyards

Art: @artdailybykitty

w/r/t this discussion about children (e.g., @pure, @sheabutterbitch)

I think it is important to acknowledge that child-bearing and child-rearing are prescribed by femininity while simultaneously appreciating that children are, despite appearances, deeply hated in the West – and it is possible to trace this hatred to the philosophies that underlie capitalism and hegemony, and the theories about children that they subsequently produce. When we (1) understand people as fundamentally evil, self-interested, and subsequently inclined to do evil and act in self-interest unless deterred, and (2) understand humanness as synonymous with independence, agency and autonomy, and subsequently view dependence on others as a moral evil that should be avoided and discouraged at all costs, our interactions with others are imbued with a fundamental distrust and suspicion.

Almost nowhere is this as exacerbated as in interactions with children, who are understood as (1) not-yet-human because they are dependent on adults, and (2) requiring deterrence, punishment, and suspicion about their motives because children, as not-yet-human, are ruled by fundamental impulses to selfishly manipulate the adults they depend upon. I’m sure there isn’t a soul who hasn’t heard that they should let an infant or toddler “cry it out” – that they should ignore a child’s distress instead of “caving in” because rewarding their bad behaviour will reinforce it and prevent them from becoming independent. Here, children in distress are monsters, spoiled brats, little shits throwing temper tantrums for the sole purpose of inconveniencing adults. Punishment and neglect aren’t just the right answer in this situation – they are a moral imperative.

But what if we began from a different understanding of humanness? What if humanness wasn’t defined by independence, but by interdependence – by needing others to survive and thrive? What if people were understood not as fundamentally evil, but as fundamentally vulnerable? That manipulative, barely-human creature wreaking havoc suddenly transforms – they become a person, overwhelmed and asking for help (see @sheabutterbitch’s post about children and hyperconsciousness). The correct and moral response to a child in distress is no longer hatred – it is patience, openness, understanding, and empathy.

We, who were ourselves once children not given the benefit of the doubt, must ensure that we reject the violence inherent in capitalist and hegemonic ideologies that leaks into the most intimate and seemingly remote aspects of human life. Children, like all human beings, want to feel safe, understood, and loved – and we should work toward a world where that is possible for all of us.

THE MOON SIGNS AND THE EARLY ENVIRONMENT

The Moon indicates our emotional style. But equally important, it indicates how we experienced our mother and our early environment and how that affected us psychologically. Our early environment and the type and degree of nurturing we received are critical in shaping our psychology and establishing a sense of security and trust. In this culture and in most others, the father teaches the ways of the world and how to function in it. The mother’s role, on the other hand, is to build the foundation of security, trust, and love necessary for healthy feelings about others and ourselves. If this foundation is cracked or insufficient, we will not have the emotional resources to face our task as an adult of providing for our own survival and that of others.

Our family and our early environment are selected by the soul before life and can, therefore, be read in the chart. The Moon and its aspects, the ruler of the fourth house and its aspects, and the planets in the fourth house and their aspects describe our early environment. They also describe the mother and her attention to us. More accurately, they describe our experience of her and our early environment. Although these aspects describe both the early environment and the mother, the planets within the fourth house seem to describe the environment more than they do the mother. And the houses of the fourth house ruler and the Moon describe the mother’s interests and where she puts her energy. If we have been more influenced in our early years by our father or another caretaker, the Moon and the fourth house will describe that individual.

Moon in Aries

The early environment of this Moon sign is likely to be colored by competition and conflict. The conflict may be between the parents, the siblings, or any combination of family members. This Moon sign also may signify animosity or anger on the part of the mother toward her family or spouse or in general. In any case, the home environment is often tense and competitive, and the individual who grows up in it may be tense and angry as well. On a more positive note, the mother may be strong, independent, assertive, and possibly athletic and encourages these traits in her child. Some with this Moon sign have families who are involved in the military or athletics. In general, the environment is more masculine and encourages the development of masculine traits even in its female children.

Moon in Taurus

Unless the Moon is afflicted, the Taurus Moon’s early environment is likely to be peaceful and stable and meet the child’s physical needs. The home is likely to be comfortable. The family may even be well-off financially. The mother is often affectionate, dependable, and a good cook. However, little attention may be given to emotional and intellectual needs. With this Moon sign, security and material comforts often supersede emotional needs. Consequently, many with this Moon sign repress or are unaware of their feelings. Children in such families often follow the model presented them by finding comfort and satisfaction in material things rather than in people. Love becomes equated with food and gifts. As a result, their relationships may be with toys, food, or television.

Moon in Gemini

Gemini Moons are likely to be bright and intellectually inclined, and the mother fosters this. The mother usually plays an educative role and happily meets the child’s intellectual needs. This is a home where education is valued and reading and schoolwork are emphasized. However, the child’s emotional and physical needs may not be attended to as enthusiastically. Although the mother may be an intellectual role model, she may be less helpful in modeling other skills, such as intimacy and managing in the world. She may not be very affectionate or emotionally demonstrative. In some cases, the mother feels more like a friend, a peer, or an aunt.

Moon in Cancer

This Moon sign is ideal for establishing a solid foundation for adulthood. Unless the Moon is afflicted, the mother probably enjoyed being mother and homemaker. She is likely to have met the child’s physical and emotional needs. When our physical needs are met, we feel valued and recognized; when our emotional needs are met, we learn to value and trust our feelings. Feelings are important because they point to our needs, and only by having our needs met can we grow physically, emotionally, intellectually, and spiritually. So, recognition of our feelings is crucial in our early years. It is how self-worth is built and tantamount to being validated as an individual. The Cancer Moon’s mother is someone who attends to her child’s feelings and makes herself available physically and emotionally, which supports the development of self-esteem. On the other hand, the ties with the mother can be too close. The mother is identified with her children and may be possessive, smothering, and overly protective. This may make it difficult for the child to grow up and establish an independent identity.

Moon in Leo

When it is not afflicted, the gift of this Moon sign is a firm sense of self and self-worth. Confidence can go a long way in life. This gift of confidence instilled by the mother establishes a foundation for the Leo Moon’s future successes. The mother’s warm, expressive nurturing style lends confidence to her child. She is likely to have showered her Leo Moon child with attention and affection, so the child comes to expect this from others. This may, in part, be a self-promoting act in that she views her child as an extension of her own ego and love flows from this place of pride. Her child can do no wrong because it is her child. She is likely to encourage her child’s creativity and self-expression and may be creative herself. She is dramatic, forceful, and a show-stealer. The child learns to get her attention by doing the same.

Moon in Virgo

The early nurturing that Virgo Moons receive may be dedicated but dry. The mother is likely to be efficient, orderly, hardworking, and responsible but emotionally inexpressive. She is educated and thorough in her approach to motherhood, studying all the latest manuals about raising children. This care and attention is noticed by the child and makes up in many ways for the mother’s lack of warmth and playfulness. Nevertheless, Virgo Moons may struggle with expressing their emotions, having not had a model for this. Although they may not learn to be emotionally expressive, the dedicated care given to them is often sufficient to build their self-esteem. They, in turn, make dedicated and efficient mothers. On the other hand, the child’s self-esteem might be undermined if the mother is hypercritical and fussy, as is often the case with this Moon sign. In that case, the individual is likely to become self-critical or critical of others too.

Moon in Libra

When not afflicted, this Moon sign represents a beneficial home environment. The early home life is likely to be harmonious and peaceful, and the mother takes pride in providing a home that is both aesthetically pleasing and emotionally supportive. The absence of conflict and argument in the home is often apparent with Libra Moons, for they mirror this non-confrontational style in their relationships. They are likely to have learned how to negotiate and compromise in this early atmosphere, which can later serve them well in their own family relationships and work. The mother might be artistically inclined, refined, and well-versed in social etiquette. Culture and the arts might be emphasized in the home.

Moon in Scorpio

The early environment of Scorpio Moons is often difficult and intensely emotional. Abuse or misuse of power and authority are a possibility, leaving the individual angry or repressed. The mother or another family member may be domineering, manipulative, possessive, or controlling. There is often an undercurrent of hostility and resentment in the home and a sense of deep, dark secrets that no one is allowed to speak about. The secrets could include such things as violence, sexual abuse, addiction, criminality, psychological problems, or illegitimate children. On the other hand, the mother may have been highly attentive to the child’s emotional needs and bonded deeply with him or her. This is fine for the infant, who needs this bonding, but as the child matures, this can feel overbearing and possessive. Since identification by both parent and child is so strong, Scorpio Moons often have difficulty breaking the tie with their mothers as adults. The emotional intensity of this relationship often continues over the years. This deep psychic connection between the mother and child may, in fact, originate in a former lifetime.

Moon in Sagittarius

This Moon sign often represents a less traditional nurturing experience. The mother’s nurturing style is easygoing and liberal. Freedom is important to her and this attitude is conveyed to the child by allowing him or her freedom to explore, ask questions, and investigate life. However, there may be too little responsibility expected from the child and too few rules to allow the child to develop the inner discipline necessary for adulthood. Or, the mother may be off having her own adventure. So, although the mother may be a model of independent action and adventure, she may not be available to provide the security and stability that a child needs. She might lack responsibility and behave more like a friend than a parent. It is common for those with this Moon sign to live in a foreign country or be influenced by foreigners when they are growing up, perhaps by traveling a lot. The military family is an example of this. The family values freedom more than they do stability. They often move or travel a lot.

Moon in Capricorn

With this Moon sign, something may be lacking in the early environment. The mother may be ill and unable to care for the child, absent from the child’s life, depressed, repressed emotionally, over- worked, or unable to cope with the duties of motherhood. Sometimes the mother dies. Harshness is another possibility. The mother may be unloving, overbearing, strict, rigid, and restrictive, allowing little leeway for the child to act like a child or express his or her emotions. In any case, the child receives insufficient mothering. On the other hand, the early home life may be stable, secure, orderly, and attentive to responsibilities, supplying the child with the structure and discipline needed to function effectively in the world as an adult.

Moon in Aquarius

The Aquarius Moon’s early home life and mother are likely to be unique or unusual in some way. The individual may grow up in a household with progressive ideas about child rearing and considerably more freedom than most children. This free and tolerant atmosphere exposes the child to ideas that other children might not encounter. However, although this is an advantage intellectually, the child may have difficulty getting his or her need for closeness met. Aquarius, although tolerant and altruistic, is not known for its emotional warmth. Young children, however, do need close emotional interactions with adults to form a solid foundation of trust and a sturdy sense of self. As a result, Aquarius Moons may learn at an early age not to expect others to meet their emotional needs. Consequently, as adults, they may have trouble addressing the emotional needs of others. When afflicted, this Moon sign may indicate a chaotic home, inconsistent nurturing, divorce, or a disrupted home life, which can leave emotional scars and affect the individual’s ability to form intimate relationships later on. Several moves or changes in the early years are common. These can either cause insecurity or teach the individual to make the best of change.

Moon in Pisces

Pisces Moons may undergo some loss or hardship in relation to the mother. She may be psychologically incapable of caring for her child, mentally ill, addicted to drugs or alcohol, or neglectful. On the other hand, she may be artistic or musical. She is often religious, kind, and selfless. Religious or spiritual activities may be carried out in the home. In either case, Pisces Moons learn compassion, either through their own suffering or their mother’s compassionate care. When they are cared for lovingly, they learn to care lovingly for others. If they have been neglected, however, they may grow up with the same psychological damage as their mother and be prone to drug abuse and mental illness.

  • keith: you were definitely wrong, i'm not meant to be a leader of voltron
  • shiro: oh come on, i'm sure you weren't that bad
  • keith: i almost killed everyone on multiple occasions and got the team stuck on a planet where the AIR EXPLODES

4. Genius

She’s a girl, they scoff in disbelief. Like that diminishes her worth. Like it dooms her quest for recognition from the start. (It does) Like that’s all they will ever need to know to judge and find lacking.

She’s a genius, they sneer in anger. Like that cheapens her accomplishments. Like she owes her victories to a cheat code everyone else had the good grace not to use. (Only worse) Like that’s all they will ever need to know to judge and find lacking.

*

5. College

There are two letters of acceptance on her father’s desk.

One is from MIT. It promises a future in the world of numbers and ratios, coloured by the jeers and laughter and doubt that is sure to follow her every step.

One is from Oxford. It promises a time of adventures and new experiences in another country, its light clouded by ideals of properness she will never fully meet.

It’s college, and though it’s not the rest of her life it’s a defining step in who Antonia Stark is, who she will be, to the world as much as to herself.

Her father is watching her expectantly, eyes as dark as the whiskey in his glass.

The check needs to be sent tomorrow, he says. The decision is yours, he doesn’t say.

And Antonia is eleven, too young and too smart and still smiling with too much teeth. She is four, left alone in her room with no one to comfort her because Starks are made of iron. She is thirteen and disqualified from her school’s competition because it wouldn’t be fair to the other children (to be shown up by a girl three years younger than they are). She is six and boys keep pulling and pulling and pulling her pigtails until she cuts them off.

She is fifteen and she chooses.


Last parts of this ‘verse for today and also the end of the first ‘chapter’. Or as much as this story has chapters at any rate. Nvm ignore me

do we all agree that matt holt is the least responsible holt child? do you think he got banned from mcdonalds? matt holt seems like he got banned from a mcdonalds at one point.