respect hawaiian

People who are telling me that I need to get over the idea that Jennifer Lawrence scratched her butt on a rock in Hawaii, my birth place, need to realize that you guys need to get over yourselves.
I’m not targeting one particular person because I am biased towards her. I am upset about the unprofessional action she did, after she was told not to touch them. Then she had the audacity to laugh about it on national tv. Even Chris Pratt, the man sitting next to her on the show who also lived in the islands for some time, was uncomfortable about it.
You may not believe in our superstitions or traditions, but we ask that you respect our land and in return we will respect you. However, because of her actions I have lost all respect for her and I do not see her as a professional anymore. She deliberately disrespected Hawaiian tradition and many of you will think “get over it,” but if I disrespect your household or your personal space you would be upset too, correct? Same idea. If you come into Hawaii, we will welcome you to our home, our land. If you disrespect our home, we will disrespect you.
Family and respect is big in Hawaii, so don’t tell me to get over something when you have no idea what it’s like to live in someone else’s shoes.

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Stuff has been getting to me lately so I want to show you guys an authentic hula performance. It’s just so annoying to see people do some stupid hollywood version of the hula when it is such an important part of the culture, and so much goes into it. Those costumes and head pieces and leis were probably all made by the dancers themselves, and in a halau being in sync is vital, and the night before a performance they all have to braid their hair and then brush it out right before the performance to get it that way- they all have to look the same, in appearance and choreography. And that hollywood version of the outfit is so stupid, look at these beautiful outfits. So much work and love and pride goes into this dance and then people mock it and the culture. I just wish people cared more.

There was a commercial on TV where these two white girls put a “little hula girl” dance figurine on the dashboard of their car, and it’s just so urgh. Frustrating. Nobody would put a little Mexican figurine in a sombrero on their dashboard (but I did just watch a Party City commercial selling “Mexican” decorations and sombreros for Cinco De Mayo like come on guys). And that new “Aloha” movie coming out- starring all white actors on the Hawaiian islands, doing nothing that has to do with Hawaii, just using it as a prop. And all these rich white people travelling to Hawaii for funsies then coming back saying, “I loved Hawaii, the hotel was beautiful, but those natives are so mean, they are only nice if you are paying them for something” Hm I fucking wonder why- maybe because their land was taken from them and now they are forced to work in these swanky hotels while they live in squalor and have to perform their own sacred cultural dances for these rich tourists’ entertainment. This rant got longer than I wanted so I’ll end it there.

Just please stop mocking the Hawaiian culture.

Moana Rant

Y’all, I just have to get this off my chest:

 My mother is full-blooded Hawaiian, and my father is the whitest man I know. My sister and I are both, respectively, half Hawaiian. We both have the thick, black, curly hair; the gold-toned skin; the big Hawaiian nose; we’ve been taught the folklore and some of the language…so when I saw that Moana was coming out, my heart filled with so much joy, I cried. When I saw the movie, I wept the entire time. FINALLY, a Polynesian princess (and I have to repeat that: POLYNESIAN princess, not just Hawaiian). However, there was this looming dread at the fact that this amazing cultural movie about my people was finally happening. And gotdamn wouldn’t you know I was right to be scared? 

While it fills me with so much happiness to see people love this movie, y’all gotta stop trying to make Moana look like every other disney princess because she ain’t. I respect artists and I understand that there is some leeway in the way you draw, but stop taking away what makes her Polynesian for the sake of your aesthetic. Please. I am begging you. Stop taking away her big beautiful wide nose. Stop taking away her dark golden-undertoned skin. Stop taking away her voluminous, curly, DARK hair. Please just stop. I have waited my entire life to see someone who looks JUST LIKE ME be important in media, and now y’all taking away what makes her Polynesian? Are you serious? 

And another thing: Moana is about the Polynesian people, and all their diversities. The people on Moana’s island are not all one type of Polynesian people (i.e. Maori, Hawaiian, Samoan, Tongan etc.) , they make up all of us. This movie mixes demi-gods and goddesses and folklores from all of our societies, and shows how truly diverse, magical, and sacred all of our cultures are. Please do not act as if you know everything about Poly cultures just from seeing this movie, and do not think that because this movie is out it gives free range for you to have lu’au or wear those cheap grass skirts and flower crowns; LEARN your Polynesian cultures. With this movie becoming influential and important, please let it remind you to be respectful of all Polynesian culture and to educate yourself on all the wonders our different cultures have to offer. Give this space to those of us who are finally having representation and finally get to enjoy our culture being on the big screen for everyone to enjoy and become a part of. 

E pili mau na pomaika`i ia `oe (May blessings ever be with you)

Reasons to watch Lilo and Stitch
  • backgrounds are literally watercolor how rad is that?
  • cute aliens
  • all them round shapes
  • sisters, sisters, there were never such devoted sisters
  • the existence of David Kawena literally the best human ever
  • how they actually respect Hawaiian culture and make fun of tourists
  • music that’s in Hawaiian but impossible not to try and sing along to
  • Hawaii
  • Cobra Bubbles, CIA
  • early 2000s girl-pop version of Elvis Presley at the end
We need to remember: Native Hawaiian Culture > Local Culture

I see this all the time from locals when issues on Hawaiian culture arise, where we think just cause we grew up around da culture, we have any say in how it should or shouldn’t be used.

Lucky we live HI but it doesn’t make us free from harming Native Hawaiians. We who do not have Hawaiian in our bloodlines, are haole to these lands in its original meaning. Yes, Hawai’i is a much more loving place than most and I am so proud to be from Hawai’i, but we are not free of racism, neo-colonialism, etc, including against Hawaiians.

When local culture says one thing but Hawaiian says another, Hawaiian culture wins, because it is HAWAIIAN CULTURE. We as locals, haoles, cannot combat the feelings and lived word of Hawaiians. Ainokea if we grew up with one thing and all of a sudden they saying different. Such as with Hapa. Local culture says its anyone who is mixed with anything. I grew up around that, you grew up around that. But that is false. That is erasure of the true meaning of Hapa, of what the identity of Hapa was born out of, of the Hawaiian culture attached to it. You are not Hapa if you are not part-Hawaiian, no matter what local culture says.

Hawaiian culture always comes before local culture. Respect the culture and respect Native Hawaiians.

OK BUT INDIGENOUS HAWAIIAN GRIF SIBLINGS HEADCANONS

  • GRIF SINGING ‘ALOHA 'OE’ AS A LULLABY EVERY NIGHT EVEN THOUGH HIS VOICE WAS REALLY REALLY SHITTY
  • GRIF TEACHING HIS SISTER ABOUT ALL OF THE STORIES AND TRADITIONS MOM TAUGHT HIM BEFORE SHE LEFT BECAUSE DAD IS WHITE AND DRUNK AND DOESN’T GET IT AND SOMEBODY HAS TO
  • KAIKAINA HAVING SEX WITH EVERYBODY BECAUSE DAMN SHE LOVES SEX BUT LIKE HELL IS SHE FUCKING THE KIDS WHO SIDE WITH THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT LIKE HELL IS SHE FUCKING IGNORANT TOURISTS SHE HAS SOME GODDAMN STANDARDS
  • GRIF HATING SCHOOL BECAUSE FIRST OFF HE HAS A WHOLE WORK DAY AHEAD OF HIM WHEN GETS HOME (THE CIRCUS PAYS SHIT AND DAD PAYS LESS) AND KAIKAINA SINGING SONGS TO HIM TO HELP HIM RELIEVE HIS STRESS
  • GRIF FEELING LIKE HE ISNT A “REAL” NATIVE BECAUSE HIS SKIN IS LIGHTER THAN SISTER’S AND HER SITTING HIM DOWN AND FORCING HIM TO TELL HER STORIES UNTIL HE FEELS BETTER
  • GRIF SINGING 'ALOHA 'OE’ ONE LAST TIME TO SISTER’S GRAVE WHEN SHE FINALLY DIES FOR REAL OR VICE VERSA AND EACH CARRYING ON THE LEGACY EITHER WAY
  • NATIVE HAWAIIAN GRIF SIBLINGS

anonymous asked:

Yes, we must respect the Hawaiian culture and help perpetuate it into the future, I agree with that. But also, Mauna Kea is by far the largest mountain in the world, don't you think it's fair to lend some of it to the very people who are trying to discover the unknown? The majority of the mountain's area is undeveloped, and the majority of the island of Hawaii is undeveloped, one more telescope at the peak shouldn't make a difference.

That’s the mindset everyone has until it’s too late. “Let’s take some of this because, wow, these people have a lot, but we’ll eventually keep taking to the point where they’ll have nothing left.”Hawaiians are the most landless people in the world. Everyone wants to say they have a piece of us. Let us keep what little we have left. Again, is there a way that the other telescopes can contribute to what these universities want?  

“Aloha” and The Continued Legacy of Hollywood’s Backwards, Whitewashed Hawaii

Originally, this began as a response to my friend Mokihana Aki sharing a depressing sound bite on Facebook, from Rachel McAdams in regards to Cameron Crowe’s new movie “Aloha.” I was already quite incensed about the film, for reasons I will outline soon. When I read the following quote, however, what started as an angry Facebook comment thread, turned into my very first blog post. 


The following response was in reference to some criticism the film had met in regards to its portrayal of Hawaii. Quote: “Just my experience of being there and working with Cameron [Crowe] I think he was very respectful of Hawaiian culture and really embraced it. You know we kicked off the film with a traditional Hawaiian blessing that one of the Hawaiian chiefs conducted and we spent a lot of time listening to Hawaiian music and going out and experiencing Hawaiian culture so I think that’s an unfortunate, probably not fair comment from my point of view having been there with him.“



Really…unfortunate? Not fair? In my opinion, if ALL your characters are White in a movie that takes place in Hawaii; if nobody properly pronounces Hawaiian words; and cultural references to Native Hawaiians are not 100% factual (you have Google now, so there’s no excuse for you making stuff up anymore!), then no, I’d have to say you were NOT and are NOT respectful of Hawaii’s people and culture. Oh, and if you’re not fully convinced, then here’s another great sound bite from the director himself: “I say whether you see it this weekend or later on TV or something, check it out because we really honor Hawaii in every frame of this movie.” 


Look, I love you Cameron Crowe. You’ve been one of my favorite filmmakers for years. But seriously? SERIOUSLY? Every frame? Explain to me, then, why the hell there are absolutely NO people of color in this movie’s trailer? Not. A. Single. One. Believe me, I LOOKED! I’m talking main characters, supporting characters, extras…NOTHING. Oh sure, if you’re lucky you might catch a brown blur in the background sea of extras, or see a glimpse of the requisite hula dancers that for some reason always appear on the runway of the airports in these movies set in Hawaii. Yeah, maybe back in the day of Elvis movies that happened, but no WAY does it exist today. 


Oh, and don’t forget the shot of White people making simple trite hula moves…you can’t have a movie in Hawaii without it! Sure, hula is an actual part of Native Hawaiian culture, rooted in sacred religious beliefs. Sure, hula was actually banned for over 50 years by White missionaries, effectively neutering Hawaiian culture for multiple generations. Sure, the Hawaiian language was banned for almost 70 years, reducing the amount of Native speakers to a small, SMALL handful today. But clearly, none of those things are as important as maintaining stupid, ignorant stereotypes and myths about Hawaii, in a time when there is no longer an excuse for perpetuating those images. If Cameron Crowe had set his movie on a Native American reservation, and had his all-White cast run around with feathers and painted faces, howling with their hands over their mouths, he would have been torn apart, right?




Why, then, is Hawaii and its people considered so damn expendable? Why does a place where its culture and history are ripe with factually accurate stories and characters, get reduced to a paradise backdrop mysteriously absent of the racially diverse population it is famous for? If all you want are pretty beaches and lush green valleys in the background, Hollywood, I hear green screen is a highly effective filmmaking tool! 



Lastly, I must address the title of this film: the one Hawaiian word that is synonymous in every tourist or non-Hawaii citizen’s mind with their image of Hawaii and its people. The gimmick of its double meaning (something, I might add, that is common in other languages, INCLUDING ENGLISH) has been snatched by 20th Century Fox’s crack marketing team and roped into becoming fodder for a cheesy tagline on a poster: “Sometimes you have to say goodbye before you can say hello.” Well, if these inept geniuses even bothered to do a simple Google search, they’d know that while the word “aloha” does have multiple meanings including “hello,” “goodbye,” and “love” (feel-good rom com, you guys!), the important meaning of the word is its literal translation: breath of life. 



Now, having not seen this movie yet, I will not discount the possibility that Mr. Crowe somehow managed to take a minute out of his day to learn this, and perhaps even address it at some point in the film. However, using a word that is literally connected to the life spirit of the Hawaiian people, as the title for your archetypal Hollywood romantic dramedy? The one with the all-White cast that takes place in one of the few places in the country where WHITE people are actually the minority? The film that takes such an important word in the Hawaiian culture and strips it of its identity, all for the sake of a cutesy, witty marketing campaign? Yeah, you’re right. That’s TOTALLY honoring and respecting Hawaii. 



Opening today, the film “Aloha” is already receiving mixed reviews, so it’s possible that karma has doled out some form of justice for its crimes against Hawaii. However, with big Hollywood stars and a big Hollywood director behind it, this film could still make a decent amount of money this weekend. For this reason, I beseech you all: do not allow this blatant reimagining of Hawaii to continue. The reality of Hawaii is very different from this image of paradise nirvana and tokenism culture that Hollywood won’t stop ramming down our throats, and there is no longer an excuse for this truth to be ignored or forgotten. While we watch diversity succeed in leaps and bounds on film and TV this year, and the industry scramble to reap the rewards, the people of Hawaii are forced to watch the same atrocious missteps of ‘Hollywood’s Hawaii’ trotted out to the masses without any care for the people it’s marginalizing or the culture it’s rewriting.

When the White settlers first came to Hawaii in the 1700’s, it was the diseases they brought that nearly wiped out the Native Hawaiian population. Now, it’s the warped image of Hawaii, manufactured by the tourism industry and Hollywood’s pop cultural consciousness, that reduces our people to insignificant blurs in the background. The inane hula girl on the taxi cab dashboard. My entire life, I’ve watched the buffoonery of ‘Hollywood’s Hawaii’ paraded across decades of film and television, all the while dreaming of the day when I’d see the Hawaii where I was born and raised, on the big screen. I never expected that I would reach my 28th birthday, and continue to see the same absurd stereotypes I saw in movies made 50 years ago. 



Yet here it is, 2015, with all its modern and technical advancements, and we’re still watching the same hokey nonsense play over and over again like a broken record on the silver screen. In an age where white celebrities in Blackface and Victoria Secret models in Native American headdresses are acknowledged as racist and offensive, it is somehow still perfectly acceptable not just to objectify and typecast Hawaiian culture at every turn, but to assign it an entirely new identity. Hollywood has literally been rewriting Hawaii for decades. The scary thing is, no one seems to notice or care.



The only way this will change is if the people OUTSIDE Hawaii choose to change the prescribed course, and start indoctrinating the current and future generations with a fresh dose of reality and respect. Don’t worry, folks. This isn’t nearly as difficult as it sounds! Remember: all you have to do is Google.

7

In this episode we find out an other big difference between Danny and Steve: Danny believes only in what he sees (and sometimes not even that ;)), while Steve is more of a believer… I guess this makes Danny even more Scully and also makes Steve a little bit Mulder :D

I like that they talk about this matter, they share again something more about who they are, I love the respect Steve shows toward Hawaiian culture, but I also understand Danny’s point of view.

Anyway I chose this particular scene just because it’s funny and I love Steve’s faces ;)

anonymous asked:

Hey you wanna know something cool? So apparently in Hawaiian mythology, owls were used to rescue souls from the underworld and guide armies. (Probably explains the ghost type) It is also known that a Hawaiian god became an owl to protect the Hawaiian people. Out of respect, Hawaiians never point at them. Too bad Pueo owls are endangered :(

Oh that’s really interesting, thanks for telling me! I think it’s cool how owls are universally associated with spiritual and supernatural things. And yes they are lovely owls :‘0