resource: tutorials

Un-uglify new tumblr controls

Tumblr’s new controls were obnoxious, disgusting and just a bad design choice in general, and I couldn’t stand it, so I wrote a script to make it actually look decent enough whilst still maintaining all the functionality. The only thing about it is that the dashboard button is gone, but that’s easily fixed with a separate link somewhere I guess.

It’s small, out of the way in the top right corner, has a transparent background and the buttons are all white with black text, but you can use filter:invert(100%) just like what we did with the old controls. [preview]

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Color Reference Guide to Recognize & Avoid Whitewashing

I’ve made a tutorial on how to color adjust to fix washed out coloringsbut I noticed people aren’t always sure when their coloring needs fixing in the first place. So I’ve made a bunch of colorings you can use to compare your own to. It’s designed to help avoid whitewashing, but also help avoid over-correction.

If you’re not a content creator, you can also use this guide for reblogging as well. :)

Using the Guide

  • Each set comes in three: cool, neutral, and warm. If your coloring is bluer/whiter than the cool tone, consider readjusting.
  • Examples of what might be too pale/bright are beneath each set
  • There are various categories (daytime, night scenes, etc) for each type of scene you might encounter
  • Each coloring has a color palette beneath for the highlights, midtones, and shadows of the character’s face. If you’re having trouble eyeballing it, use the eyedropper tool to double check.

NOTES
1) For the sake of simplicity, I’ve used one character per category, but characters of color are not interchangeable. Identify the skin tone for the character you’re coloring and work with that. This is only meant to give a frame of reference for what is and isn’t whitewashing

2) If any of the colorings look different than what they’ve been stated as (i.e. the cool tones look too warm or some look way too dark to be visible) calibrate your monitor. It means your screen color and gamma needs readjustment.

Guide itself is under the read more!

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6

this was gonna be a tutorial and i guess it still is but if anything it’s just a really long and drawn out “essay” on drawing people with epicanthic folds. one of my biggest pet peeves is people drawing asian people exclusively with the same type of eye they’d give white people or anyone else who typically doesn’t have the fold! however i know that most people are taught with the standard white person eye (google image search for “eye” and it’ll all be pictures of white people’s eyes) so learning to draw epicanthic folds is a consciously learned thing. 

therefore i bring you this, which attempts to break the mechanics of epicanthic folds down into something that’s a bit easier to digest and implement in your own art! 

style can be argued i guess but it’s not that hard to stylize eyes with folds if you do proper observation and research. eyes with epicanthic folds are as diverse as eyes without so it’s not like you have to adhere to a strict model for them (although many people think that you have to) and all it takes to distinguish the two in stylized art (and even in semi/realism once you think about it) is a few lines! like i said this is a learned process but it’ll make your asian characters (and characters of other races even) a bit more interesting and believable.

gif tutorial: colors! all the colors!

alright so i was asked how to make gifsets like this, this and this. basically: how to make very colorful gifsets with 1 main color.

these are the gifs i’ll be showing you how to make:

in this tutorial, i’ll be showing you how to make pink, purple and blue gifsets. there’ll be one section for each tutorial, so if you only want to read one of them, you can press cmd + f and type in “pink tutorial”, “purple tutorial”, or “blue tutorial”. you need to have basic gif skills to follow this tutorial, such as cropping, sharpening & basic understanding of coloring layers (like selective layers, curves, etc).

NOTE 1: especially when making purple and pink gifsets, it’s super easy to end up whitewashing characters of color. please use the advice given in each coloring tutorial on how to avoid whitewashing and don’t let your gifs transform beautiful characters into pale, grey and sick-looking creatures. if you have any questions, feel free to ask me about it!

NOTE 2: this will be a very long post because i like thorough tutorials myself so that’s what i tend to make. it’ll be quite image-heavy and, well, long. really long. so the actual tutorials will be under the cut.

NOTE 3: the coloring pattern for the gif tutorials are more or less the same (i.e. first curves, then levels, and so on), but it’s the color isolation that differs between them.

alright lets get started!

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Road to Success: Before Opening for Commissions

Artist’s Notes

**First off! I made this specifically for DeviantArt, and then realized that it really applies to every artist who is looking to get into the market of freelance work. I apologize that this journal references that site specifically quite a bit, but the information is still solid.

Commissions. Commissions. Commissions!
It’s all anyone on here seems to talk about. It’s like a measure of popularity.
But there’s a lot of danger in opening for commissions before you’re prepared, and that’s what this particular journal is about. Let’s avoid the common commission pitfalls (a journal for another day  ) and get a healthy, fully prepared start!

Build Your Fanbase

I’ve seen some people join deviantArt (or other sites) and instantly expect to get commissions. We’re talking the same day that they sign up.
Sorry, that’s just not how it works. Actually, you’ll be lucky to get commissions on deviantArt at all. DeviantArt is a community of artists. Sure, there are some buyers on here as well, but very rarely will you find regular work on this site. I like deviantArt because it’s a social network with other artists. It’s a place where I can come to make friends and learn. Sure, I can advertise myself on here, but most of my work comes from my Twitter, Tumblr, and own legwork.
I’d recommend establishing yourself with the same username in as many places as you comfortably can. When you’re narrowing down the prospects, I’d say to avoid small, start-up art communities (you know the ones I’m talking about, those “exclusive”, “by invite only” art sites. Who is going to buy your work there?). Make yourself known on established websites where there is already a user base to be a part of. Twitter, Tumblr, Art Station, Behance, deviantArt, LinkedIn, ConceptCookie and even FurAffinity (if you’re into that kind of thing) are all fantastic options.

Understand Pricing and it’s Consequences 

First off, don’t sell for points. Points is quite literally the equivalent of pocket change. 80 points is $1.
That means that if you’re selling a full color image for 500 points (which I see all the time) you’re selling it for $6.25.
$6.25 for a full picture. A full picture that I can promise you’ve spent more than a half an hour on.
I’ll write a full journal on how pricing works, but generally, you should not be selling your work for less than minimum wage per hour.
I’ll go through a lot of other pricing options in the other journal, but keep in mind that you are working on artwork. This is your time and you should be paid for it. Yes, you might absolutely LOVE doing artwork (so do I!) but you should still be paid for creating images for other people.
If you choose not to be paid now, or to be paid in pocket change now, or to be paid for $5/hr now, you’ll likely regret it later. Your “target market” for lower pricing will not be the same as your target market for average pay. People who pay in dA points likely won’t be returning for more work later, and if they do, it’ll be for the same price. People who are willing to pay what your work is worth are more likely to be repeat customers, are likely to talk more about your work if you do a good job, and are, of course, willing to give you the amount that you deserve so that you’re doing less work for the appropriate amount of money. If you spend most of your time targeting the lower-range market you won’t be able to raise your prices later. (For the record, I’m not talking about general watchers and followers, some people just can’t afford to buy art or don’t need it, but they’re no less valuable in terms of having an awesome fan base. We’re strictly talking about clientele here).

Create a Strong Terms of Service Agreement

Do your research!
Don’t just look at other ToS Agreements on deviantArt, many of them are not strong. If you can’t afford to hire an attorney, do some serious Google searching. There are a ton of really good samples of what your ToS should include.
Again, I’m planning a full journal for this as well, but a few points I could make right now are to include;
A) That you own all rights to your work. Make sure that this is a part of your Terms of Service. Yes, it goes without saying that you own what you make, but many times customers have the misinformed idea that because they’ve paid you they automatically own the artwork and can sell it, make prints of it, etc.
B) A clause about what happens if you become ill. I know it’s likely not something you’re thinking about now, but what if you take a commission and suddenly become ill or are involved in an accident of some kind? You’ll want to detail out what happens. Does the customer get a full refund? Do you require an extension on the work deadline? Do you retain their deposit or the payment for the work that’s been completed, but refund the rest? Think about this now, not later.
C) Bounced checks and returned payments. What if the client pays you in a check and it bounces? What happens if they do a charge-back with PayPal? Is there a fee that you’ll need covered? Most companies have a Returned Payment Fee because they don’t want to get stuck with the fee from the bank or processing center. It’s a smart fee to have included in your contract. From a consumer point of view, I know we all hate that fee, but from a business perspective, it’s a smart idea to have.
D) Do you have a Rush Fee? If a client contacts you and says “I need this done in three days time!” and your average turn around is a month, will there be an additional charge? Keep in mind that this means you’ll be putting all your other clients on the back burner, working longer hours than usual and possibly even weekends or holidays - maybe both. Most artists do have an additional charge for this. Think of it as over time.

**Have a Terms of Service before you open for commissions. Not after. Don’t wait for something to happen where you wish you’d had one.** 

Have Samples of Your Work

Weirdly enough, I felt the need to add this in here. I’ve seen a few people open for commissions that they don’t even have examples for. I’ve been contacted by people who have seriously told me “I don’t have any samples of animation, but I’m a really good animator. I work for $50/30 seconds. When do I start?”.
What?
No!
Don’t be that person. If you’re offering character design commissions, have some samples. If you’re offering storyboard commissions, have some samples. Illustration? Have some samples. Badges? Make some samples. Animation? You guessed it. Samples.
By doing this you’re not only showing your potential customers that you can provide the work you’re claiming you can and giving an example of quality, you’re doing yourself a favor by knowing an approximate of how long it’s going to take you to finish the work so you’re not overcharging your customer or short changing yourself.

In Closing

Remember! These steps aren’t just to help you get more commissions, they’re there for your protection. You don’t want to be involved in an all-too-common horror story scenario where a client can take advantage of you, and you don’t want to give your client a horror story about yourself (that they’ll undoubtedly share with every one of their friends and followers).

Protect your client, protect yourself, and protect your business.

10

Hi everyone! 

First of all, I just wanted to thank y'all for all the love on the last tutorial I posted -I’m glad people found it worthy of sharing and reading. I wanted to make this one more in-depth. I don’t think I would call this a “tutorial” to achieve something specific, but a look into the thought process that goes on regarding environments, storytelling and execution. Hopefully you can relate it to your own thought processes you currently have.

Have a good one, guys! If you got questions, do ask ‘em. :)

(Also. I know I’ve been quiet in posting new art lately. A lot of the art I can’t show yet but there is cool stuff on the way.) 

{  Finished piece -original post: Bright Autumn  }

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anonymous asked:

/post/93381216287 how did you keep her hair intact when you cut her out? i can't remove backgrounds without messing up a person's hair :(

Super easy lil trick for removing backgrounds without completely compromising hair integrity (gonna use my favourite baby in the world to explain this because he has the perfect hair for it).

1. Using your weapon of choice (I use the polygonal lasso tool), select the shape of the model’s hair and then click the “Refine Edge” button (highlighted towards the top in the example).

2. Under View Mode, change View to Black & White; under Edge Detection, select Smart Radius and set the Radius to 1.0. LEAVE EVERYTHING ELSE AT 0 (my Shift Edge got rebellious for the screenshot, but really, leave it at 0).

3. Now WITHOUT HITTING OKAY AND WITH THE REFINE EDGE WINDOW STILL OPEN, take your cursor (should be a circle with a plus in the middle) and drag it along the very edge of the black silhouette where the hair is. You should start to see it peeking through in a very defined manner if you’re doing it correctly. Once you’re finished selecting all the hair, hit OK.

4. What Refine Edge does is it seeks to separate the contrasting colours (the off-white backdrop from his dark hair). It will select as much of the background as possible so you can more easily get rid of it.

5. Hit delete. And bam! Instead of an awkward flat edge, you have pretty, mostly intact curls. But because this method is not without its flaws, some parts of the hair can look crispy or it can remove too much in spots. We can fix that…

6. by taking the Smudge tool, setting it to between 1-3 pixels (depending on strand width) with a strength of around 85, and slowly dragging from his hair to create new curls and fill in the bald spots.

I hope that helps!

-Ashley

Tutorial: How to remove background from image but still keep hair intact.
This works best when the background is solid but in the past I have tried it on images with a scenery background & it does work but it’s just a bit more fiddly with the mask & after editing. You’ll need a basic understanding of vector masks, here’s a tutorial if you’re stuck. If the video’s a bit fast & a little confusing I have written down instructions under the cut. It might be useful to watch it full screen.

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theoverobserver  asked:

Help!! I draw a lot and I really want to pick up a style and perfect it, but I can't figure out which one. I draw Anime but I also want to get into semi- cartoonistic/realistic drawings. Do you have any style master lists or advice? Thanks

Hi there, @theoverobserver, thank you for the excellent question!

I would say you should draw whatever you like, and in whatever style you like. However, I really think it’s essential to keep practicing all kinds of styles until you find your own niche. 

 Experimentation is truly key to developing your own, signature style. In fact, it may be fun to draw one character in multiple styles, trying to create multiple iterations with varying levels of realism. 

For instance, I started drawing manga style, but then slowly tried increasing my realism, and found out that while I like manga at times, I mostly love to draw realistic/semi realistic characters. 

You could go search through sites like deviantart/behance and try to find artists you like, and then see if that’s what you’d like your art to be influenced by. This can be a useful exercise, but I do think it’s important to try and create your own style, not copy someone else’s. 

I don’t think style is something you can perfect quickly, and I think being flexible and dynamic will help your art improve in the long run. 

Hopefully this helped you somewhat!

Handpicked Further Reading/Resources: 

  • Stunning artist on dA, FOERVRAENGD / @foervraengd [ follow them!! ] has the greatest series of tutorials ever, and seems to be what you’re looking for: 
  • MANGA to REALISTIC:

Please consider giving this post a reblog/like if you enjoyed it! It helps @art-res reach more people!

More Helpful links: Ask a Question/Request a Tut |Submit a Tutorial | Promote Your Art Commissions to +15 K Dashes | Support my art on DeviantArt / Tumblr ( @astrikos )

soft pastel-y ish giffing + colouring tutorial

ahhhh such a professional title 

so someone requested i do a tutorial on how i make gifsets but they didn’t request a specific set though so i’m just gonna do it on my most recent one (if there are any other ones any one wants to see then drop me an ask

all the gifs above used this colouring although it will not work for all scenes (trust me i learned this the hard way) but with a bit of tweaking it can work for a fair few

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How to record Instagram’s live videos on iOS X

So, as a lot of you know, our dear Co-Captain Floriana Lima has a liking for going live on instagram, and so do we. Only problem is, the lives don’t stay up, and it is not possible to watch them again on instagram once they end. The only way to rewatch them are by actually recording them while they’re streaming. Luckily, there is a way to record your phone’s screen, and we’re going to show you how! 

Don’t forget, she did say she would go live with Chyler soon, so keep an eye open, and a computer nearby ;)

 Here’s how to record your screen: 

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youtube

Tutorial: Manga Colouring

  • Program: Photoshop CS5
  • Level: Beginner
  • Type: detailed, step by step
  • Duration: ~13min
  • Finished Colouring

English isn’t my mother tongue, so please excuse all eventual mistakes. Feel free to ask questions and/or request more tutorials! 

This was requested by anon and @warmvanillasuga; I hope it’s helpful :)

How to add falling snow to a gif:

  • Some people requested this.
  • English is not my first language but I’ll do my best to explain the steps :)
  • I use Photoshop CS6.
  • Like/reblog the post if you find it useful.

1- It’s really simple and everyone can do it. First of all select a picture and a transparent gif. These are the gifs I use in my edits. Resize the image, add some coloring,texture etc.

2- Open you transparent gif another section, resize the gif as the first picture. Convert to video timeline and select the last frame.

3- Take your picture and put it to the top of the gif.

4- Select lighten or screen. I usually select the lighten one.

5- After you select screen or lighten, save your gif.