i was terrified of doing this in undergrad, and now that i’m asked to write them fairly often, i am fondly exasperated when my students don’t know how to ask for them. obviously there’s no single way, but here’s the way i usually do it.

THE FIRST EMAIL

  • should be short & should mainly be asking whether they’re willing to write you the letter
  • should provide only the basics - what the professor absolutely needs to know.
    • the position you’re applying for
    • when the letter would be due
    • optional: if you’re afraid they won’t remember you, a quick line identifying yourself & your relation to them
  • i like to provide an “out,” in case they don’t want to or are unable to write the letter

SAMPLE
Dear Professor X,
I’m applying for a job as an English tutor at the University Student Resource Center, and was wondering if you’d be willing to write me a letter of recommendation for the position. [optional identification: I really enjoyed taking English 300 with you in Winter 2016, and I’m hoping to develop and pass on those skills to other students through this job.] The letter would be due by September 1st - I know you’re very busy, so I completely understand if you’re not able to write one. 
All best,
Your Name

THE SECOND EMAIL

  • they said yes!! amazing.
  • this one can provide a little more information – a link to the job posting, if there is one, or you can write a quick summary of the position, plus a sentence or two about why you’re excited/interested in the job.
  • also tell them where to send the letter!! 
    • directly to the recruiter for the job
    • to you, to add to your application packet
    • upload to an online LoR service or to an application website
  • 99% of the time folks are fine with receiving electronic copies, but if they need to mail a hard copy, let them know up front.

SAMPLE:
Dear Professor X,
Thank you so much! I really appreciate it. Here’s the link to the job listing; the letter should be sent as a .pdf file to the email address at the bottom of the page, anytime before 9/1. Thanks again – I’m hoping that this job will provide me with some teaching experience and the opportunity to work on my own writing. Please let me know if you need any more information!
Best, 
Your Name

WHEN TO SEND A FOLLOW-UP

  • these stress me out real bad but here’s the deal: most professors have a very shaky relationship to deadlines (especially when they have half a dozen more important ones than your piddly LoR). 
  • the upshot: do not be afraid to nudge them. 
  • often they need the nudge and are appreciative of it.
  • when that nudge happens is up to you and how much room you’ve given them before the deadline, and it’ll look different depending on your relationship with that professor.

GRAD SCHOOL LETTERS

  • i offered to send my professors essays that i had written for their classes, especially if i had taken those classes more than a year before asking them to write the letter, just so they could refamiliarize themselves with my work. you can also offer to send them your writing sample, if you haven’t already asked them to look it over for you.
  • honestly i’d recommend asking for these in person bc it’ll give you a chance to talk to them about their grad school experience and your own hopes & aspirations, which will help them write a more personal, fleshed-out letter.
  • one important note: if this letter is intended for use in grad school applications, do not stress out if it’s a little late. most programs do not care, and pretty much all of them accept late letters without a problem. your professor’s ability to meet deadlines does not reflect on you, and professors are intimately familiar with running late on LoRs. they really honestly don’t care. as long as it gets there before too long, you’ll be fine.
  • thank-yous are up to you! keep in mind that many departments have policies about gift-giving. i did give thank-yous to my three major letter writers, but they were handwritten cards & homemade cookies, nothing store-bought or expensive.

witchy-love  asked:

Hi, I'm a new witch with a problem. I have books and an online community to help me, but i barely have any herbs, candles, etc. Im a secret witch as well. any tips?

I have many links full of tips that may prove useful to you!

Budget Magic:

Discreet Magic:

* not my choice of title

I hope that helps! :D

How To Take Notes

Note Taking Methods

How To Make Notes Look Pretty

How To Make Notes Using One Note

Note Taking Printables

3

Hello friends!

Studying for long important exams like the DAT (me (’: ), the MCAT, or even the SAT/ACT requires a lot of time budgeting! Today I was scheduling DAT studying for the next 20 days, and I realized that a progress percentage chart would be really useful  for me because it would allow me to plan goals such as “finish a 1084-page review book” or “watch 46 chemistry videos from the video playlist” long-term! It’s hard to put long arduous tasks like these onto a daily or even weekly schedule - for me, they seem to work better when measured by %-finished.

I made this to use for myself this morning, and then realized that it might be useful for some of you out there, too! So I’ve uploaded it to google drive so you all can use it if it will be helpful in your studies. They come in blue, pink, yellow, and grayscale (for black-and-white printing): >>DOWNLOAD HERE<<

EDIT: I’ve gotten a suggestion from a very nice anon to make the background white so the printable does not use as much ink when printed in color! >>HERE<< is the link the white-background version on GDrive :)

To use this chart, I filled out specific goals on the left hand column and colored in the progress bar in the right in accordance with the percentage of the task or goal I had finished. I also marked dates next to the progress bar so I knew when I should have finished 50%, or 75%, or 100% of a task, etc. Here’s a pic of how I used it:

Keep reading

here’s just a small list of study tips and tricks that i learned over the course of
attempting to take six ap classes all at once (don’t do that to urself pls):

  1. take notes - take all the notes! it doesn’t matter what way you take notes (cornell, etc.) it’s just a really nice way to make sure the material really sticks in your brain
  2. revise said notes - it’s all about beating the curve of forgetting; as long as your keep on revising and re-annotating your notes, you won’t need to super cram on test day. in addition to that, don’t highlight a dense block of text; underline, colour-code, and add notes to the margins. instead, if you just highlight like crazy, you won’t know what to focus on revising. not saying that highlighting is bad, just saying that overhighlighting is bad
  3. actually read the textbook - a lot of teachers assign pages of textbooks but i recommend reading the entirety of the textbooks and working through the examples. sure, it’s a little bit more work, but you end up with a well-rounded view of the topic/subject you’re studying (and i also find that a lot of teachers will skip important topics in the interest of time, so be sure to read the textbook so you don’t miss out)
  4. do all ya homework - so important! do the homework!!!!! you will not succeed if you don’t put in any effort and don’t do any of your work!!!!!!!!!
  5. if you have time do extra problems in your textbook - just for revision/practice!
  6. redo old hw assignments - this helps in revision, esp. in topics like math where you have to physically work out problems to understand concepts; you don’t get math by just reading the textbook, you have to physically DO problems
  7. maybe invest in a review book - it helps some people, but don’t completely rely on it; you still should read the textbook
  8. flashcards are the bomb - they help solidify learning and because of awesome apps like quizLIT (hehe) you can learn/revise on the go
  9. ask questions - the teacher wont bit your head off- they’ll be grateful that at least SOMEONE was paying attention in class
  10. pay attention to the teacher - if your teacher seems to repeat some terms over and over again take that as a hint to revise that, lots of teachers have really effective lectures too and its just a good thing to show respect to others too
  11. make metaphors/analogies for EVERYTHING - for example, think of the declaration of independence as a breakup letter or try to string together events like the revolutionary war together in a narrative style; this helps with memorization of factually-dense topics like the ones in APUSH
  12. study grps are aMAZING - very helpful 10/10 recommend and check out my post on this too
  13. call a friend - don’t be afraid to ask for help. seriously. we all suck at things and its our job to get better
  14. relax once in awhile - you don’t need to study 24/7 to succeed. study smarter, not harder and TREAT YO’ SELF
  15. on the subject of music - listen to music if it helps you, but if you find yourself drifting off or enthusiastically singing to BTS’s new comeback, you gotta stop girl
  16. sleep - don’t pull all-nighters unless you need to; studies show that sleep helps in the consolidation of memories, etc. so get that sleep! that way you’ll be happier and more in the mood to study - its a marathon, not a sprint
  17. find textbook companion sites - very helpful, they usually contain self-quizzes and generally if your teacher uses the chapter tests provided, you can better tell what types of questions will be asked
  18. revise your mistakes - don’t just discard that test with the 94%, make sure you understand what you got wrong so you don’t make the same mistake again
  19. actively hoard your papers - old papers/tests/hw are the best review fodder so don’t loose it!
  20. track your grades - be on top of it always! if you have a missing assignment or if a teacher put in the wrong grade DON’T HESITATE TO EMAIL THEM
  21. find other resources when your teacher sucks at teaching - khanacademy is amazing. enough said
  22. YOUR GRADES DO NOT DETERMINE YOUR SELF WORTH! repeat after me: GRADES DO NOT DETERMINE SELF WORTH!
  23. self-care is important - if your sad tired or angry, YOU WONT GET ANYTHING DONE so do yourself a favor and take a nap or watch a movie, idk
  24. figure out what works for you - i like the pomodoro technique but other people do different things so just do what works
  25. you’re fantastic and you got this
journal jar challenge

100 journal prompts for you to pick out each day: make and decorate a little jar, write all these prompts on bits of paper (or just print them out) and put them in the jar, and then pick out one each day and write about it in your journal. if you are thinking about starting one, this is a good excuse to start!

1. your favourite band right now
2. the last concert you went to
3. dear ______, here is something ive never told you
4. yourself
5. body positivity
6. what kept you awake last night?
7. food
8. some things that make you happy
9. cultural appropriation
10. colours
11. dear past me
12. fluffy blankets
13. highs and lows of today
14. a playlist for when you are feeling sad  
15. how did you feel this morning?
16. your favourite book 
17. your friends
18. ten quotes you love
19. someone you really want to punch
20. dear future me
21. your pets
22. the most fun you have ever had
23. your sunshine
24. what did you dream last night? 
25. what are you worrying about?
26. places you have enjoyed visiting
27. a playlist for when you’re angry
28. what song makes you dance?  
29. draw your feelings
30. someone who inspires you 
31. how was your week?
32. write something down that you can’t tell a soul
33. who, from your past, would you not mind seeing?
34. something that scared you today
35. write a wishlist
36. what are the world’s problems today?
37. ten restaurants you love
38. what is your saddest memory?
39. what are you looking forward to?
40. a playlist for when you are happy
41. your favourite season
42. a headline from the newspaper today
43. what did you learn this week?
44. write a letter to someone you need to forgive (this could be yourself).
45. how do you stand out from the crowd?
46. short term goals
47. what would you like to do today?
48. list your otps
49. what have you been thinking about the most today?
50. your strangest talent
51. thoughts on religion
52. reality check: something you need to realise but can’t admit to yourself
53. do you believe in karma?
54. what is your greatest weakness and strength?
55. do you feel like you belong?
56. five songs that make you smile
57. are you happy with yourself?
58. a memory with a family member
59. why you are grateful for someone
60. where are you right now?
61. someone you admire
62. a good movie you watched recently
63. what can you smell right now?
64. dear ______, i love you because
65. a playlist for when you’re uninspired
66. the worst place you have been to
67. a song that really resonates with you
68. what does your dream room look like?
69. what is the weather like right now?
70. if you wanted someone to really understand who you are, what would they have to read, listen to, and watch?
71. where do you see yourself in 10 years?
72. have you been bullied?
73. are you an artist?
74. one word that describes your mood
75. how are you feeling, pal?
76. do you feel you were born in the wrong era?
77. something that inspires you to become an activist
78. what do you dislike about yourself and why?
79. something that makes you laugh
80. top ten movies to watch
81. who is the most supportive person in your life right now?
82. make a collage that is aesthetically pleasing for you
83. don’t hold back, just vent until your hand hurts
84. if you were an animal, what animal would you be?
85. who do you miss?
86. first five words that come to your mind
87. do you sometimes doubt your existence?
88. a playlist for dancing to
89. long term goals
90. the most disappointed you have ever been
91. how are your relationships with others going?
92. your ideal world
93. paste an image here
94. somewher you would like to be right now
95. why are you upset?
96. talk about your best friend
97. ten people you want to meet
98. a poem you like
99. your favourite story
100. what makes you smile?

100 Acts of Resistance

The first 100 days of Trump regime is critical and where he has the best chances to push for his agenda in the next four years. In townhalls I’ve attended and questions i see people always ask online is wanting specific directions and what concrete things can we do to resist Trump and GOP.

Below are 100 basic action items you can take to resist the Trump and GOP agenda in his first 100 days and in the next four years. These generic action items can be applied to take action on any current issue or on any specific issue you’ve been passionate about for a long time. 

While it’s encouraged to do as many of these as you can, especially in Trump’s first 100 days, the point of the list is to give you different options on actions you can take that will fit within your time and abilities, and it is by no means exhaustive. The goal is to motivate you to take an action no matter how small, and hopefully provide a jumpstart to take bolder actions in resisting fascism: 

  1. Follow all your representatives on social media, esp on Twitter and Facebook
  2. Save all the numbers of your elected officials on your phone & designate a schedule within your day or week to call them
  3. Visit your elected officials’ website, subscribe to their newsletter/events calendar/follow their bills
  4. Call your Senator #1
  5. Call your Senator #2
  6. Call the Senate Leader (Mitch McConnell)
  7. Call your Congressperson
  8. Call the House Speaker (Paul Ryan)
  9. Call the VP office (Mike Pence)
  10. Call the White House Call Donald Trump Hotels
  11. Call your Governor
  12. Call your Mayor/County Executive
  13. Call your City/County Council Member
  14. Call your State Senator
  15. Call your State Representative
  16. Write* your Senator #1
  17. Write* your Senator #2
  18. Write* your Congressperson
  19. Write* your Governor
  20. Write* your Mayor/County Executive
  21. Write* your City/County Council Member
  22. Write* your State Senator
  23. Write* your State Representative
  24. Write the House Speaker
  25. Write the Senate Leader
  26. Write the VP office
  27. Write the White House
  28. After initial letter or call, follow up with your elected officials
  29. Write letters to editors of local newspapers
  30. Attend a protest in your area
  31. Plan/organize a protest in your area
  32. Attend a townhall (with your representatives)
  33. Attend a city/county council meeting
  34. Attend a legislative hearing
  35. Attend a school board meeting
  36. Attend your rep’s public event
  37. Attend a neighborhood community meeting (esp with law enforcement)
  38. Attend a community event (with community leaders & grassroots orgs)
  39. Participate in a community conference call/grassroots webinar
  40. Plan/Host a community event
  41. Sign a petition
  42. Get at least five other people to sign a petition
  43. Start a petition on a local issue
  44. Invite a friend to participate in a protest
  45. Invite a friend to attend a townhall
  46. Invite a friend to a community event
  47. Invite a friend to community call/grassroots webinar
  48. Get a friend to write a letter to the editor of a local paper
  49. Get at least one friend or family member to call/write their elected official, esp those with GOP reps
  50. Schedule a meeting with one of your elected officials
  51. Read and Share news articles (help spread facts, not propaganda news!)
  52. Follow reputable journalists on social media, esp on Twitter & FB
  53. Follow local, regional and national newspapers on social media
  54. Follow government agencies on social media
  55. Follow activists on social media
  56. Follow civil rights organizations on social media
  57. Subscribe to text alerts and newsletters from civil rights organizations
  58. Participate in an online campaign to spread public awareness or get attention of Congress
  59. Volunteer for local affiliates of nationwide civil rights organizations
  60. Volunteer for local democratic party
  61. Volunteer for a local progressive organization
  62. Volunteer in a political campaign
  63. Volunteer for a local community service project (serve.gov)
  64. Volunteer for a civil rights organization (local & national)
  65. Volunteer for an immigrant and refugee organization (local & international)
  66. Volunteer for an LGBT rights organization (local & national)
  67. Volunteer for reproductive rights organization (local & national)
  68. Volunteer for a healthcare/public health organization (local & national)
  69. Volunteer for an anti-poverty/hunger organization (domestic or international)
  70. Volunteer for an anti-homeless organization (local & national)
  71. Volunteer for an anti-trafficking/anti-slavery organization (domestic & int’l)
  72. Volunteer for an humanitarian organization (domestic or international)
  73. Volunteer for a voting rights organization (local & national)
  74. Volunteer for a veterans organization (local & national)
  75. Volunteer for a disabilities organization (local & national)
  76. Volunteer for a climate change organization (domestic & international)
  77. Volunteer for a non-partisan organization (local or international)
  78. Volunteer for a non-governmental organization of your choosing
  79. Donate to a civil rights organization (local & national)
  80. Donate to an immigrant and refugee organization (local & international)
  81. Donate to an LGBT rights organization (local & national)
  82. Donate to a reproductive rights organization (local & national)
  83. Donate to a healthcare/public health organization (local & national)
  84. Donate to an anti-poverty/hunger organization (domestic or international)
  85. Donate to an anti-homelessness organization (local & national)
  86. Donate to an anti-trafficking/anti-slavery organization (domestic & int’l)
  87. Donate to an humanitarian organization (domestic or international)
  88. Donate to a voting rights organization (local & national)
  89. Donate to a veterans organization (local & national)
  90. Donate to a disabilities organization (local & national)
  91. Donate to a climate change organization (domestic & international)
  92. Donate to a non-partisan organization (local or international)
  93. Donate to a non-governmental organization of your choosing
  94. Donate to a local democratic party
  95. Donate to a political campaign
  96. Register to Vote
  97. Get at least one friend or family member to register to vote
  98. Vote on municipal, state and national elections
  99. Get at least one friend or family member to vote
  100. Run for office

*letters, postcards, fax, email, open letters on newspapers

Preventing hand injuries from digital art

I got a question about drawing injuries, and I typed up a pretty lengthy response so I wanted to share it here as well.

I get asked a lot about hand strains and injuries, and it is something most artists have to face one time or another just because we work so hard for our dreams. I personally don’t get strains or injuries, both for art and for piano playing when I still majored in it, two main creative paths where hand/arm injuries are common. My hands rarely feel tired and when they do, I stop drawing. So when I get asked, I usually can only offer the fact that you can find a lot of carpal tunnel exercises on google and there’s nothing else I know about relief exercises, other than I find that flinging my hands also help loosen them up a bit.

The most important thing about this issue is actually prevention rather than relief. I would like to believe this approach is what prevented me from getting injured–I’ve never really been a push through the pain type person, and glorifying suffering and pain as a sign of hard work is definitely unhealthy, as those are huge signals from your body telling you to stop. There are many things that I know for sure strains your hands much more than anything else that I will list below, and I believe that, if it is possible for you, the most efficient way to deal with injury is to find out which of these things is the cause and working around it.

The first big cause is posture; if your arms have no support points (ie you have to hold your elbow up with your muscles or tense your wrist to maintain stability) you will strain much easier, just like how you get tired easier standing at an uncomfortable pose vs a well grounded one. So be sure to seat yourself so that you have somewhere to rest your arm while drawing, while your body is at a relaxed angle with full support. For a normal tablet, rest your arm and wrist somewhere on the table or the tablet. For a Cintiq or tablet monitor, try having it upright so that your elbow can rest on your desk, and your wrist can rest on the cintiq screen, and you only need to use your fingers to control the pen.

The second cause is your grip on the pen. This can be caused by your need for precision/speed of repetitive movement/pressure. Line art, or cross hatching, or pressing hard to get the darkness of the brush you need, are all high stress activities that strains your hand much more than, say, rendering or putting down a base painting. Knowing that, you can:

  • Use a higher brush opacity or turn off pressure sensitivity for opacity to prevent yourself from having to press really hard to get brush impact you want.
  • Go to your wacom tablet preferences if you have one, and set the hardness of the brush so that it’s easier to get the brush opacity/size you want. You want to have the problem of having to try to press lighter for lighter lines, rather than having to press harder for darker/thicker lines. The latter strains much more than the former.
  • If your grip of the pen is too tight purely because the pen is slippery/too small for you/hard to grip, such as old bamboo tablets, there are rubber tablet pen paddings that you can buy online, or you can just use a layer of masking tape all around the grip area to increase friction/grip comfort and make it easier for yourself to hold your pen. A Cintiq or Intuos Pro pen is ideally what you want your pen to feel like: have friction on the surface so your fingers don’t slip, large enough so it rests and takes up space comfortably between your thumb and index fingers without you tensing and curling your hand inwards really hard, and shaped so that your grip is stopped right before the cone of the tip, preventing slipping.

The third cause is the schedule of your drawing. This may or may not be possible to change because for a lot of us, a deadline is a deadline. But try to space your tasks so that you cycle between intense, detailed, hand-straining work, and relaxing, loose, more brainstorming work. The latter is excellent for hand rest while still being productive creative work. For example, if you are drawing comic pages, it might make sense in terms of efficiency to sketch 10 pages, then ink 10 pages, then tone 10 pages. But when you are inking those 10 pages consecutively, that’s when you give your hands no rest and your hand will start to hurt a lot, while you have no choice but to push through the pain to get the work done. Instead, try to draw these pages one by one, or have a few drawings at various stages of completion to rotate between. eg. you work on inking drawing A, then when you feel your hands are strained, switch to putting down loose underpainting for drawing B, switch back to inking drawing A, then start brainstorming drawing C and think more/draw less. Give your hands some natural times to rest up with less intense work, and you get work done without having to lose time by having to really stop drawing altogether.

As tempting as it is to try to feel like you are working as hard as you can to achieve your dreams and aspirations, while feeling guilty about resting/taking the more relaxing route, remember that your hands make your art possible, so treat them well! 

4

PSA FOR FELLOW BORDERLINES!!!

This FREE app, Daylio, is fantastic for recording and observing data about mood changes and stuff. You can record multiple entries per day (I’ve set alarms in my phone to write every two hours) pick a mood rating and activities you’ve done, and add a journal-style entry.

It processes all your data into easy-to-read graphics, so that you can see daily and monthly changes, try to track patterns, see how different activities affect you, and see graphs for your average mood over a month or a year. You can also see graphs for your average mood while doing a specific activity. The activities log is also highly customizable, so your entries will be accurate.

This app is very helpful for tracking patterns and seeing what kind of activities help or hurt you. (For example, if I’m separated from my FP for too long, get isolated for too long, or am in a situation where my relationships feel threatened, it’s bad– but when I travel, eat well, and spend quality time with FP & loved ones, my average mood increases significantly!)


Anyway, I’ll stop rambling now, but please reblog this great resource so it can reach as many borderlines as possible!!! (This is probably useful for other PDs and mood disorders too, actually)

We’re processing over 78 years of this man’s daily diary entries:

“But collections can be hard to summarize; 78+ years of diary entries contain multitudes. The preoccupations of a 13 year-old at boarding school are different from those of a 28 year-old trying to make it as a writer in New York City and struggling with his homosexuality; and even if the John Baxter Black of 1960 is still recognizable in the John Baxter Black of 2000, the world he’s moving through and reacting to has changed a great deal.”

Learn more about our process.

Spells for Serenity, Calming, Relaxation, and Peace

Updated: July 21st, 2016