residence life

when you’ve played a certain video game over than ten times already but you go on tumblr and see some cool gifs and pictures and you’re like “o, fuck it man, I’m gonna replay”

Overrated First Year Advice

Disclaimer: I don’t mean to discredit the posts that have these suggestions in them… However, I know that for people going into first year university, it can be stressful seeing pages and pages of “must-dos” and feeling like you have to do them all. As always, different things work for different people! 

Talking to Profs 

  1. Getting to know profs personally. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to profs personally, don’t feel like you have to. In upper years, it can be really valuable to know profs for recommendations, etc. but in first year this is less important. Profs also don’t usually mark your work in first year, so you don’t need to suck up to them for good grades. 
  2. Going to office hours every week. Going to office hours can be very valuable if you have questions about the course or an assignments. However, I see a lot of posts telling students to go every week even if they don’t have a question. You don’t need to do this unless you want to! Often times, profs will even request that you talk to your TA before them.
  3. Emailing the prof if you miss class. Unless you go to a very small school, the prof is not going to notice if you miss class. You don’t need to email them telling them why you were absent, you can just go to a different section of the lecture or get the notes from someone. (If you have labs/tutorials/seminars, the same does not apply!! Email your TA.) 

Studying and Grades

  1. Starting to study for tests six weeks in advance. This is one piece of advice that always baffles me. The semester is only 12 weeks long (usually), so if you have a quiz in week 6, you can’t start studying for it much before week 4 or 5. Also, there is no way you will retain the finer details of things if you learned them 6 weeks before writing the test. 
  2. Guaranteeing a 4.0. I see a ton of posts telling students how to guarantee a 4.0 average or straight As. But honestly, as much as you do all of the readings and go to lectures and follow all of the studyblr advice out there, you can still get a TA who won’t give any mark higher than an 80. Just try your best and know that even though getting high marks is great, it is not the only indicator of success in uni. 
  3. Sitting in the front of the class. This is not a necessity. A lot of people post that if the prof can see your face and remember you, you will get better grades. However, in first year, the prof doesn’t mark your papers usually and even if they did, your paper doesn’t have a photo of you on it. Also, they teach so many classes I doubt they just naturally remember the first three rows of each one and no one else. Just sit where you are comfortable and can pay attention and see, and you will do fine. 
  4. Choosing your major in high school or based on what job you think you will get. If you think you want to major in something and then it turns out you hate it, that is fine! Your major should be a subject you are passionate about and can get good grades in, not something that you chose in high school or will “guarantee” you a good job (although, its also okay if your major is all of the above). 
  5. Taking full notes on a topic before the lecture. If you are going to the lecture with a ton of info already, it is easier to get distracted or to feel like you don’t need the lectures at all. Instead, take notes in the lecture and then supplement them with notes from readings or bonus material rather than the opposite way. 

Textbooks

  1. Buying textbooks online. I definitely think that buying textbooks online can be a good idea, but sometimes it is just easier to buy them from the bookstore. For example, if you are not sure if a site is legit/the book will come in time/its the right edition, etc. it might just be safer to get it in person or buy it used on campus from an upper year. (Remember, you can probably sell it next year!) 
  2. Buying old editions of textbooks. If you have the two books side by side and can tell that they are very similar, go for it. But often times, two different editions are totally different and can just mess you up. Science and math books often have different practice questions, and even in social sciences and humanities, the content can change drastically in one edition. 

Lifestyle/Personal

  1. Buying extra storage and furnishing for your dorm. Make sure you do a virtual room tour or talk to someone about the layout before you buy a ton of storage. Most dorm rooms that I have been in have a ton of storage (mine has a closet, a huge desk, shelves to the ceiling, a dresser, and cabinets for extra storage). You don’t want to show up with way too much stuff. 
  2. Keeping 1000 things in your backpack. If you live on campus, you don’t actually need to carry every single thing on earth in your bag. It will get annoying carrying around a heavy backpack while walking. Unless you are going to the library for a huge study sesh or can’t make it back to your room all day, pack lightly! 
  3. Avoiding wearing “freshman clothes”. No one cares what you are wearing. People often wear pajamas or just track pants and a baggy t-shirt to class or the caf. If you like dressing up, that’s great! But don’t feel like certain clothes are off limits. 
  4. Living at home meaning you aren’t independent. Posts that look down upon living at home or going to your home university are garbage posts in my opinion. Being able to live away from home is a privilege, and many people are not financially, physically, or emotionally able to do that. If you are living at home, do not feel bad about it. You are still an adult and you are still independent. 

Hope this helps reduce some rising freshman anxiety! And remember, if you do want to follow any of the original tips, that is okay too. :) 

In need of more active people to follow.

Reblog or like incase you’re posting the following.
• Video games in general, although mostly..
• The Last of Us
• Life is Strange
• Dragon Age
• Persona 5 or any Persona game really
• Dishonored
• Uncharted
• Bloodborne
• Dark Souls
• Resident Evil
• Silent Hill
• The Evil Within
• The Wolf Among Us
• The Walking Dead
• Both Borderlands and Tales From the Borderlands
• The Witcher
• Skyrim
• Outlast
• Alice Madness Returns
• Final Fantasy
• Until Dawn
• Tomb Raider
• Assassins Creed
• Overwatch
• Saints Row
• BioShock
• OXENFREE
• Gone Home
• Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture
• Devil May Cry
• Mortal Kombat
• Catherine
• Red Dead Redemption

In Portal, quite understandably, the first thing curious players do is use quantum physics to check out their own ass. The second thing they do is try to put one portal on top of the other. If you know anything about portals, you obviously know this would create the kind of paradox that rips apart the universe, so players are not allowed to do it.

But ripping apart the universe is the endgame of most Internet users, so a Youtuber named CrowbCat used a custom map to squish himself between two portals. It didn’t quite rip apart reality, but it came close:

Strangely, only the top of your head remains immune to the effects of cosmic deconstruction.

6 Absurd Questions Gamers Went To Great Lengths To Answer

College Packing Do’s and Don’ts

I am currently working on an exhaustive college packing list printable, which will hopefully go out next week. But today, I thought I would do a teaser post including some items that you absolutely should or should not bring to your dorm! 

General Advice

Look at what is going to be in your room first, and don’t start buying until then. For example, if your room has a trashcan, you don’t need to bring an additional trash can.  

Do’s

  • Organizers for around your room. Go to the dollar store and pick out lots of plastic organizers, bins, and baskets for around your room. The key to keeping such a small space like a dorm room clean is making sure everything has a place. Things like school supplies, makeup, keys, random samples, etc. all need a place to live or else your room will get chaotic.
  • Bath robe and shower shoes. I know, saying you need shower shoes is kind of beaten to death at this point. But seriously, don’t even go into the bathroom without flip flops on. And a bath robe is just nice, so that you don’t have to walk around in a towel.
  • Kettle and mini fridge. Save a ton of money by making your own instant coffee or tea in the morning. And having a mini fridge is a necessity for water, snacks, and alcohol. I recommend getting one with a freezer!
  • Fan. This depends on how old your school is, but many res buildings don’t have air conditioning.
  • Cleaning supplies. You’ll want a few supplies on hand to keep your room clean, namely a duster, Windex, and Lysol wipes. However, that is basically all you will need. You don’t need to bring your own broom and vacuum.
  • Batteries, extension cords, and surge protectors. Until you get to the room, you won’t know how your outlets are set up, so extension cords might be a necessity. Batteries and surge protectors are just necessities.
  • Documents, like health and insurance information, your SIN number, and copies of your res agreement. If you need to pick up a prescription or apply for a job, you will need these important documents!
  • First aid kit. Get a pencil case or makeup bag and fill it with the first aid essentials. Pain killers, Polysporin, Band-Aids, Midol, an Ace bandage, etc. But just like with cleaning supplies, don’t go to crazy with things you won’t actually use.

Don’ts

  • Extra furniture and storage, at least until you have done a room tour. I always see packing lists saying to bring an ottoman or a beanbag chair. I disagree. Your room will probably already be cramped, and you will end up sitting on your bed all the time anyways. When it comes to storage, most dorm rooms actually have quite a bit. Having giant Rubbermaid bins and rolling storage carts might just be a waste of space. 
  • Microwave or hot plate. There will likely be a microwave and even a stove on your floor. A microwave takes too much space, and a hot plate is a fire hazard in a small room. You won’t be using them that much anyways.
  • Area rug, curtains, and other large decorations. Definitely bring some photos and small decorative items, but bringing large things like this is a waste of space in the car, as well as money.
  • Iron. Some lists also recommend you bring an iron, but unless you are devoting hours a week to laundry, you’re never going to use it. Most college students don’t even separate whites and colours, let alone iron.
  • Printer. Unless for some reason you are going to be printing hundreds of pages a week, this is not needed. You will probably end up doing readings online and a lot of work is submitted online as well. You can get pages printed for 5 cents, and even when you total the number of pages printed, it will probably be a lot less than buying a printer and paying for ink refills throughout the year.
Bulletin Board ideas "Master List"

I found a bunch of my old ideas for Door Decs, Bulletin Boards, AND Programs. Unfortunately won’t have time to complete the ideas that are listed here, but I hope that you all can find some inspiration from them! I’ll add on to this as I think of more and inform you all when I do!

This post is designated for BULLETIN BOARDS! There are separate posts for Door Decs and Programs. I left out common ideas that you see pretty often.

NOTE: I’m not including things that I plan on completing this semester, as I will make separate posts for these when they’re completed :)

Here you go! (It’s super long)

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MEDICAL BOOKS

If you’re looking for some medical (non-textbook) books to read in your limited amount of spare time, check out some of my favorites below:

The House of God by Samuel Shem

A classic pre-medical school book. It details residency life in the 1970s. You can talk about this book with almost any medical student or attending. It is practically a medical school requirement. 

Intern: A Doctor’s Initiation by Sandeep Jauhar

A more modern look into medicine residency intern year from the perspective of Cardiologist Dr. Sandeep Jauhar. Comes with the highs and lows you can expect. After having been through 6 months of residency, I would say it is very accurate.

Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story by Ben Carson. Just because I find Ben Carson incompetent as a politician does not mean I do not respect him as a doctor. He is a phenomenal pediatric neurosurgeon and this book details his story.

On Doctoring: Stories, Poems, Essays by Richard Reynolds

A book of stories and poems from doctors throughout time and also from famous poets and authors depicting their views of medicine.

Private Practice: In the Early Twentieth-Century Medical Office of Dr. Richard Cabot by Christopher Crenner

An interesting look into a Boston medicine clinic from the early 1900′s. With excerpts from old patient notes which I found very interesting. 

And if you have an interest is something more dark:

Blind Eye by James B. Stewart

The real story of a doctor murderer from the 1990′s who killed multiple patients without getting caught for several years.

Devil in the White City by Erik Larson 

The story of the World’s Fair in Chicago in the late 1800′s. A great look into the history of Chicago and the murderous doctor who roamed its streets.

And lastly:

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. Just a great book in general. My favorite.

Suggested by other users:

The Making of a Woman Surgeon by Dr. Elizabeth Morgan

Suggested by http://thetay-in-the-757.tumblr.com

This book is my all time favorite, as I am a female aspiring to work in the healthcare system myself. Dr. Morgan chronicles her own journey in the male-dominated arena of medicine in the 1970s and 1980s, as she struggles to maintain an appropriate balance between remaining empathetic towards her patients and yet must toe the line of not becoming too emotionally involved with her patients so that she burns out, as well as maintaining her own femininity in a man’s world.

When Breath Become Air by Dr. Paul Kalanithi

Suggested by http://nandemokandemo.tumblr.com

When Breath Becomes Air is an autobiography written by an esteemed neurosurgeon who discovers he has Stage IV lung cancer in his final stages of residency. It appeals to not only medical students, with his profound impressions of cadaver dissection and his first life and deaths, but also to current medical professionals by questioning philosophical domains of mortality and what a meaningful life is, as well as to non-medical professionals with moving thoughts on family, life, death and meaning. It is not a novel to be missed by any person.

Doctors Who Are Moms Say They Face Discrimination At Work

“If you become chief resident are you just going to get pregnant and have a baby?” asked the silver-haired male attending physician as I sat interviewing for the prestigious academic position of chief internal medicine resident. “That’s what all the female chiefs do, and I’m tired of it,” he added, shaking his head in clear disgust.

Gobsmacked by the blatant sexism of his interview technique, I laughed nervously and made some lame joke about working so much that I barely had time to see my husband, let alone make babies with him. Feeling absolutely professionally alone, with no good means of reporting the incident, I quietly pulled my application and plowed on through residency and life, eventually giving birth to a son at the very end of my training.

My experience is hardly unique: 4 out of 5 physician mothers say they experience workplace discrimination, according the results of a study published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Continue reading

Fun Doctor Facts

After spending the last two weeks working exclusively in the clinic I thought I’d share some of my experiences through a little known list of doctor facts*. Enjoy.

  • There is a huge doctor surplus, each physician at my clinic has about 20 patients, max
  • When not seeing patients I’m just sitting in the back room playing on tumblr and pintrest
  • Before walking into an exam room I sometimes ask to be called out so that I can continue playing tumblr and pintrest
  • I can diagnose anything over the phone, I only make you come in because your $10 copay is paying for my boat
  • Anything you come in with can be cured by a pill that only has to be taken once a month and works even if you forget to pick it up from the pharmacy
  • This pill is also completely paid for by your insurance
  • It also has no side effects
  • The only reason I recommend flu vaccinations is because big pharma pays me like a million dollars for every shot I give
  • When you arrive 45 minutes for an appointment and I say I’ll squeeze you in, remember that I only have like 20 patients total. So be sure to complain loudly to everyone who walks by and to swear loudly at me when I finally get in. Without your complaining I’d never learn to be on time
  • The fact you dropped out of MA school half way through definitely makes you more qualified to make a medical diagnosis than me
  • In fact, the only reason I went to college, medical school, and residency is because I’m really dumb and couldn’t learn everything as fast as you could
  • Other people who are more qualified to give medical opinions than me: your friends, the internet, celebrities, your neighbor the nursing assistant
  • The only reason I order blood work is to feed the lab vampire
  • There are only two medical professions, doctors and nurses. All men are doctors, all women are nurses
  • We get everything in the office for free, so please help yourself to all the tongue depressors, gloves, and otoscopes you can carry
  • There are only two pills in the world, the white one and the pink one, so I totally know which medicine you are on by the color of the pill you take
  • Your runny nose is allergies, but in case it’s something else I’m going to give you a z pack and order a head CT

*None of these are facts. Enjoy your satire.

favorite canonically lgbt+ characters (in celebration of pride month)
↳ 4. arizona robbins