Take a Virtual Tour of NASA

Welcome to NASA! Today, we’re taking you behind-the-scenes for a virtual tour looking at our cutting-edge work and humanity’s destiny in deep space!

Starting at 1:30 p.m., we will host a series of Facebook Live events from each of our 10 field centers across the country. Take a look at where we’ll be taking you…

Glenn Research Center
1:30 p.m. EDT

Our Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH will host a tour of its Electric Propulsion Lab. This lab is where we test solar propulsion technologies that are critical to powering spacecraft for our deep-space missions. The Electric Propulsion Laboratory houses two huge vacuum chambers that simulate the space environment.

Marshall Space Flight Center
1:50 p.m. EDT

Our Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL will host a tour from a Marshall test stand where structural loads testing is performed on parts of our Space Launch System rocket. Once built, this will be the world’s most powerful rocket and will launch humans farther into space than ever before.

Stennis Space Center
2:10 p.m. EDT

Our Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, MS will take viewers on a tour of their test stands to learn about rocket engine testing from their Test Control Center.

Armstrong Flight Research Center
2:30 p.m. EDT 

Our Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, CA will host a tour from their aircraft hangar and Simulator Lab where viewers can learn about our X-Planes program. What’s an X-Plane? They are a variety of flight demonstration vehicles that are used to test advanced technologies and revolutionary designs.

Johnson Space Center
2:50 p.m. EDT

Our Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX will take viewers on a virtual exploration trip through the mockups of the International Space Station and inside our deep-space exploration vehicle, the Orion spacecraft!

Ames Research Center
3:10 p.m. EDT

Our Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley will bring viewers into its Arc Jet Facility, a plasma wind tunnel used to simulate the extreme heat of spacecraft atmospheric entry.

Kennedy Space Center
3:30 p.m. EDT

Our Kennedy Space Center in Florida will bring viewers inside the Vehicle Assembly Building to learn about how we’re preparing for the first launch of America’s next big rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.

Langley Research Center
3:50 p.m. EDT

Our Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia will bring viewers inside its 14-by-22-foot wind tunnel, where aerodynamic projects are tested.

Goddard Space Flight Center
4:10 p.m. EDT

Our Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD will discuss the upcoming United States total solar eclipse and host its tour from the Space Weather Lab, a large multi-screen room where data from the sun is analyzed and studied.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory
4:30 p.m. EDT

Our Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA will bring viewers to the Spacecraft Assembly Facility to learn about robotic exploration of the solar system.

So, make sure to join us for all or part of our virtual tour today, starting at 1:30 p.m. EDT! Discover more about the work we’re doing at NASA and be sure to ask your questions in the comment section of each Facebook Live event! 

Additional details and viewing information available HERE

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

West African schoolgirls take starring role in engineering competition in Senegal

The Pan-African Robotics competition (PARC) in the Senegalese capital Dakar on Saturday reflects the growing consciousness of science education as a top priority for a government growing the economy and getting development off the ground.

Rows of young women from Senegal, The Gambia and Mali distinct in their various uniforms – blue headscarves, black pinafores and white polo shirts – screamed for their teams as robots picked up plastic cones and dropped them onto markers, all adamant they would win.

Senegal’s Mariama-Ba all-girls academy won the high school category for a “made in Africa” pump solution to flooding, and girls were well represented in the winning 11-15 age group on Saturday after showing off their robotics skills.

“Our generation is definitely the one,” said Umu Tarawally, a 14-year-old Gambian who aspires to be a doctor and patiently explained to an assembled audience of dignitaries how groundnut shells could be converted into fuel.

Her friends, she added, were telling her they want to become engineers following a week of robot and tech workshops.

niloiv  asked:

do you think it's necessary to go to film school to succeed in the industry? im self taught and ive produced my own work before but i go to a small liberal arts college

Hi @niloiv!

I believe that you can make it in the film industry with or without film school. There are plenty of great filmmakers who never went to film school and there are many that did. For me, personally, I needed film school because of my personality, the way I learn, and other factors. However, my situation certainly does not apply to everybody. Many people don’t want or need to go to film school and that’s great, too!

You are self-taught? Wonderful! Keep it up. I’m self-taught in regards to script supervising so even though I am at film school, I know learning a specific job on your own is completely possible. I do recommend that you research the crap out of the field you are interested in and reach out to people in the industry to ask them questions, expand your network (so you can work with more/different professional crew members), and possibly get a job or internship.

In a similar post I gave some resources that might be helpful.

Best,

Jules

why you should not dismiss research unless you rly truly mean it

Internet, I am a queer researcher of queer health and I have something to say.

A few weeks back, a study went viral about the relationship between marriage equality policy and queer teen suicide rates, and a lot of people reacted thusly: “queer mental health is better when we’re not discriminated against! BREAKING: SKY IS BLUE, WATER IS WET”

This happens a lot. People see research about a thing ~Everyone Already Knows~ and they mock it. Now I want to make two things really clear:

1. Everyone does not already know.

2. This shit can lose these projects their funding.

Did you know that media coverage is a crucial factor in funding allocation? When we submit our application for grant renewal, we have to provide a list of news articles about our research so they can decide whether the public cares enough about us to let us keep doing our work. And most research doesn’t get all that much coverage, so individual reactions can really matter. If the primary reaction to our publications is eyerolling, we legitimately might not be able to continue.

I’ve seen some frustration from people who believe this research funding would be better put to use “actually helping” the affected populations instead of–I don’t know, pinning them under microscopes or whatever it is they think we do. But funding for policy initiatives is driven by research. I know you wish politicians would listen to individual voices telling them where the problems are, but that’s honestly not a smart way to direct limited resources. We need solid evidence. And a lot of the areas that need the most attention aren’t obvious–who knew bisexual people are at a much higher risk for physical and mental health disparities than gay and lesbian people? Who would have guessed that transgender folks are more likely than any other group (including straight people) to be military veterans, but overwhelmingly don’t claim their benefits? I’m sure some people noticed these patterns, but they definitely weren’t common knowledge within the queer communities I’ve grown up around, and those findings are leading to direct action as we speak.

I get that it can be frustrating to feel like your identity is being reduced to facts and figures for the benefit of red tape. But trust me, the researchers aren’t your enemy here. Most of us are queer too. All of us are just as frustrated by this crap as you are. We are doing our best, and I swear to you this work really is making a difference. Please don’t sabotage it.

Writing With Color – Featured Research Guides

Although WWC shares resources when we can and bring some to the table ourselves, we don’t exist to seek outside sources for one’s writing; this is ultimately the writer’s job. Even so, we’re more than happy to offer guidance on the What, Where and How of doing research for your inclusive writing. 

Take a look at some of the research help & resources complied below:

Research

Research Sources

WWC Tags and Help

General Research

Cultural and Religious Research 

Historical Research

Fantasy Sci-Fi & Research

Name Research/Resources

Resources

Cultural and Religious Resources

WWC Naming Resources/Guides

–WWC

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wildlifefirst
 Meet the nodosaur — the plant-eating armored dinosaur! Discovered by miners in Alberta, it is the best-preserved fossil of its kind.

Science in Space!

What science is headed to the International Space Station with Orbital ATK’s cargo resupply launch? From investigations that study magnetic cell culturing to crystal growth, let’s take a look…

Orbital ATK is targeted to launch its Cygnus spacecraft into orbit on April 18, delivering tons of cargo, supplies and experiments to the crew onboard.

Efficacy and Metabolism of Azonafide Antibody-Drug Conjugates in Microgravity Investigation

In microgravity, cancer cells grow in 3-D. Structures that closely resemble their form in the human body, which allows us to better test the efficacy of a drug. This experiment tests new antibody drug conjugates.

These conjugates combine an immune-activating drug with antibodies and target only cancer cells, which could potentially increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy and potentially reduce the associated side-effects. Results from this investigation could help inform drug design for cancer patients, as well as more insight into how microgravity effects a drug’s performance.

Genes in Space

The Genes in Space-2 experiment aims to understand how the regulation of telomeres (protective caps on the tips of chromosomes) can change during spaceflight. Julian Rubinfien, 16-year-old DNA scientist and now space researcher, is sending his experiment to space as part of this investigation. 

3-D Cell Culturing in Space

Cells cultured in space spontaneously grow in 3-D, as opposed to cells cultured on Earth which grow in 2-D, resulting in characteristics more representative of how cells grow and function in living organisms. The Magnetic 3-D Cell Culture for Biological Research in Microgravity investigation will test magnetized cells and tools that may make it easier to handle cells and cell cultures.

This could help investigators improve the ability to reproduce similar investigations on Earth.

SUBSA

The Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) investigation was originally operated successfully aboard the space station in 2002. 

Although it has been updated with modernized software, data acquisition, high definition video and communications interfaces, its objective remains the same: advance our understanding of the processes involved in semiconductor crystal growth. 

Space Debris

Out-of-function satellites, spent rocket stages and other debris frequently reenter Earth’s atmosphere, where most of it breaks up and disintegrates before hitting the ground. However, some larger objects can survive. The Thermal Protection Material Flight Test and Reentry Data Collection (RED-Data2) investigation will study a new type of recording device that rides alongside of a spacecraft reentering the Earth’s atmosphere. Along the way, it will record data about the extreme conditions it encounters, something scientists have been unable to test on a large scale thus afar.

Understanding what happens to a spacecraft as it reenters the atmosphere could lead to increased accuracy of spacecraft breakup predictions, an improved design of future spacecraft and the development of materials that can resist the extreme heat and pressure of returning to Earth. 

IceCube CubeSat

IceCube, a small satellite known as a CubeSat, will measure cloud ice using an 883-Gigahertz radiometer. Used to predict weather and climate models, IceCube will collect the first global map of cloud-induced radiances. 

The key objective for this investigation is to raise the technology readiness level, a NASA assessment that measures a technology’s maturity level.

Advanced Plant Habitat

Joining the space station’s growing list of facilities is the Advanced Plant Habitat, a fully enclosed, environmentally controlled plant habitat used to conduct plant bioscience research. This habitat integrates proven microgravity plant growth processes with newly-developed technologies to increase overall efficiency and reliability. 

The ability to cultivate plants for food and oxygen generation aboard the space station is a key step in the planning of longer-duration, deep space missions where frequent resupply missions may not be a possibility.

Watch Launch!

Orbital ATK and United Launch Alliance (ULA) are targeting Tuesday, April 18 for launch of the Cygnus cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station. Liftoff is currently slated for 11 a.m. EST.

Watch live HERE.

You can also watch the launch live in 360! This will be the world’s first live 360-degree stream of a rocket launch. Watch the 360 stream HERE.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

What Science is Launching to Space?

The tenth SpaceX cargo resupply mission launched to the International Space Station on Feb. 18, and is carrying science ranging from protein crystal growth studies to Earth science payloads. Here’s a rundown of some of the highlights heading to the orbiting laboratory.

The CASIS PCG 5 investigation will crystallize a human monoclonal antibody, developed by Merck Research Labs, that is currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of immunological disease. Results from this investigation have the potential to improve the way monoclonal antibody treatments are administered on Earth.

Without proteins, the human body would be unable to repair, regulate or protect itself. Crystallizing proteins provides better views of their structure, which helps scientists to better understand how they function. Often times, proteins crystallized in microgravity are of higher quality than those crystallized on Earth. LMM Biophysics 1 explores that phenomena by examining the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. Once scientists understand how these proteins function, they can be used to design new drugs that interact with the protein in specific ways and fight disease.

Much like LMM Biophysics 1, LMM Biophysics 3 aims to use crystallography to examine molecules that are too small to be seen under a microscope, in order to best predict what types of drugs will interact best with certain kinds of proteins. LMM Biophysics 3 will look specifically into which types of crystals thrive and benefit from growth in microgravity, where Earth’s gravity won’t interfere with their formation. Currently, the success rate is poor for crystals grown even in the best of laboratories. High quality, space-grown crystals could improve research for a wide range of diseases, as well as microgravity-related problems such as radiation damage, bone loss and muscle atrophy.

Nanobiosym Predictive Pathogen Mutation Study (Nanobiosym Genes) will analyze two strains of bacterial mutations aboard the station, providing data that may be helpful in refining models of drug resistance and support the development of better medicines to counteract the resistant strains.

During the Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells investigation, crew members will observe cell growth and morphological characteristics in microgravity and analyze gene expression profiles of cells grown on the station. This information will provide insight into how human cancers start and spread, which aids in the development of prevention and treatment plans. Results from this investigation could lead to the treatment of disease and injury in space, as well as provide a way to improve stem cell production for human therapy on Earth.

The Lightning Imaging Sensor will measure the amount, rate and energy of lightning as it strikes around the world. Understanding the processes that cause lightning and the connections between lightning and subsequent severe weather events is a key to improving weather predictions and saving life and property. 

From the vantage of the station, the LIS instrument will sample lightning over a wider geographical area than any previous sensor.

Future robotic spacecraft will need advanced autopilot systems to help them safely navigate and rendezvous with other objects, as they will be operating thousands of miles from Earth. 

The Raven (STP-H5 Raven) studies a real-time spacecraft navigation system that provides the eyes and intelligence to see a target and steer toward it safely. Research from Raven can be applied toward unmanned vehicles both on Earth and in space, including potential use for systems in NASA’s future human deep space exploration.

SAGE III will measure stratospheric ozone, aerosols, and other trace gases by locking onto the sun or moon and scanning a thin profile of Earth’s atmosphere.

These measurements will allow national and international leaders to make informed policy decisions regarding the protection and preservation of Earth’s ozone layer. Ozone in the atmosphere protects Earth’s inhabitants, including humans, plants and animals, from harmful radiation from the sun, which can cause long-term problems such as cataracts, cancer and reduced crop yield.

Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect (Rodent Research-4) a U.S. National Laboratory investigation sponsored by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, studies what prevents other vertebrates such as rodents and humans from re-growing lost bone and tissue, and how microgravity conditions impact the process. 

Results will provide a new understanding of the biological reasons behind a human’s inability to grow a lost limb at the wound site, and could lead to new treatment options for the more than 30% of the patient.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

reaxeons  asked:

I searched in a lot of tags already but was wondering if there was a specific tag that would go more in depth for black hair in post-apoclyptic settings. I only found one post. I'm specifically looking for care and maintainance of 4b hair, and styles that would be best for a fallout universe situation, as well as styles that would be most likely based off of the 1950's and what to take into consideration when one goes from having the means to take care of hair to suddenly no clean water

Black Hairstyles for the Apocalypse II: Post-Nuclear  

For a situation like the Fallout game universe, post-nuclear with limited/no clean water, I can only reinforce what has already been said in Black Hairstyles for the Apocalypse; a character with afro hair would need those dependable protective styles on lock down (braids, dreadlocks, etc. look up and take your pick of protective natural styles), more so with little to no safe water to dip her head into.  

AFRO HAIR CARE RESEARCH

Everything you read up on regarding afro hair’s needs is still relevant; Black hair generally needs lots of moisture and protection.

Afro hair routines tend to involve a lot of water, oils, gels, butters and creams. You mention the character’s hair type is 4b, but hair type isn’t even the most important factor when it comes to Black hair maintenance. 4A, 4B, AC, or a mixture of– these numbers are more of a general assessment of what that hair type looks like, needs and reacts, but every individual is different. Hair width, density, and porosity is super, if not more important. Research, research, research. This information is quite accessible nowadays.

My favorite natural hair site is www.naturallycurly.com/. Pinterest has an addictive mash-up of natural hair tips, info and DIY solutions too. Note that doesn’t mean everything is relevant to your character, or even accurate so i’d check with other sources on any information you find.

Important Takeaway: Water to moisturize + Oil to keep it in.

Hair needs water (or water-based moisturizer, typically referred to as leave-in conditioner) to moisturize, and oil to seal it in lest it deplete rapidly (take it from me; my hair gulps down any bit of moisture it gets). 

Most oils do not moisturize by themselves because it cannot penetrate the hair shaft (save a privileged few like coconut oil).

Research key terms: natural hair + moisturizing/sealing, L.O.C. method

If your character has a protective style in most of the time, i’d also be researching “natural hair care with [x].” Though hair needs lessen, they do not disappear.

SOLUTIONS IN NUCLEAR APOCALYPSE

Depending on what resources can be scraped up, there may be opportunity to make or find items that would work as extra hair protection that add and seal in moisture, or even a silk scarf or bandana for extra coverage and for sleeping.

Whether a character does come across these things is mostly out of their control, so the protection that comes with a long-term style like braids is the main tool they’d have to rely on.

As for the 1950s: If this is America, you could look up African American hairstyles in the 50s but the popular styles you’ll see will likely be unfitting for the apocalypse, especially one of this nature. Straight, loosened-textured looks for afro hair won’t thrive well and will be sweated out to one’s natural state quickly, plus their hair weakened from the straightening process. 

However, there were some braided styles popular in the 50s (unspecific to Black people) that could be done for afro hair and would serve as protection. 

For example: the “crown braid” comes up a lot in a quick search (See the image above). Not sure how much one would care to style their hair to stay “with the time’s” in this situation, but that’s for you to work out.

SUMMARY:

Protection is the key here. Reliable long-term styles like braids that tuck in the ends endure breakage and tangling way more than any free-flowing style. It’s that low manipulation and vulnerability to the elements (and hands) that’s key.

For other maintenance questions, do your research and see what you come up with in terms of what the character may scavenge and make do with.

~Colette

JK Rowling gets so much hate for lack of racial representation in Fantastic Beasts, but from what I’ve seen it’s mostly non-British people who complain about it. You do realise that JKR is English, as am I, and we don’t get told anything at all about American history? Like ever? She could have researched, but that doesn’t mean she gets to change the entire cast just for you. You guys wouldn’t be happy if she did anyway. Stop thinking you’re entitled to say who to cast in movies based on HER books and HER world.

How To Do Basic Research

We get a lot of questions that boil down to, “I can’t find this thing so I’m asking you.” One of us will type in a few keywords into Google, and like a freakin’ Christmas miracle a bazillion results show up.

No bueno, folks.

We’re all here because we’re writers. Writing is hard. Research is hard, no doubt about that, but we’re talking about basic search skills. And I get it. I’m one of those people that will look for something in the fridge for fifteen minutes, not see it, and go buy another, but we’ve blown straight past ridiculous and into ridonkulous. 

Here’s an example. I don’t remember the finer points about The Treaty of Westphalia. This is distressing to me. You know what I do first?

I begin typing into my Safari search bar, and to what do my wondering eyes does appear?

Sweet Flying Spaghetti Monster! Google and Wikipedia have read my mind. I hit enter on my keyboard and…

Names, dates, locations, words I don’t know, it’s like a million genius oompa loompas condensed everything I’d need to get a basic understanding of this topic and organized the shit out of it. Near the bottom, there’s further resources, with citations no less! Let me forever sing their praises. And you want to know what? Truth is stranger than fiction and there are thousands of volunteers, many who are experts on topics, maintaining Wikipedia. Right now. Every day. All day. It’s like the one thing the internet sort of gets right.

Should it be your only resource? No, but when you have no idea where to begin, it’s a damn good place to start.

-Graphei