republic of new africa

"Sweet Creature' - iTunes
  • #1 Argentina
  • #1 Belarus
  • #1 Brazil
  • #1 Egypt
  • #1 Estonia
  • #1 Finland
  • #1 Hungary
  • #1 Jordan 
  • #1 Latvia
  • #1 Lithuania
  • #1 Netherlands
  • #1 Nicaragua 
  • #1 Panama
  • #1 Peru
  • #1 Poland 
  • #1 Romania
  • #1 Saudi Arabia
  • #1 Singapore 
  • #1 Slovenia 
  • #1 Sweden

  • #2 Costa Rica
  • #2 Hungary
  • #2 Italy
  • #2 United States
  • #2 Mexico
  • #3 Norway
  • #3 Denmark
  • #3 Cyprus
  • #4 Malta 
  • #4 Portugal
  • #4 Spain
  • #4 United Arab Emirates
  • #5 France
  • #5 Greece
  • #5 Philippines
  • #5 Turkey
  • #6 Austria
  • #6 Canada
  • #6 Chile
  • #8 Israel
  • #8 Russia
  • #10 Ireland
  • #11 Lebanon
  • #11 Slovakia
  • #14 India
  • #15 United Kingdom
  • #16 Bolivia
  • #16 Switzerland
  • #17 Moldova 
  • #19 Czech Republic
  • #19 South Africa
  • #21 Germany
  • #21 Ukraine
  • #22 New Zealand
  • #25 Luxembourg
  • #26 Belgium
  • #30 Malaysia
  • #31 Indonesia
  • #38 Colombia
  • #57 Australia
  • #79 Thailand
  • #105 Hong Kong
  • #114 Singapore

6

they/them/theirs pronouns. do not delete caption

art by rommy torrico, rommytorrico.com

and for this week:

No nos dejen solas! A todas les pedimos que luchen con nosotras!- Comandante Ramona y Mayor Ana María. Para la ‪Comandante Ramona‬, Mayor Ana Maria and all the mujeres indigenas fuertes, bellas y luchadoras del ‪EZLN‬ and for all the indigenous women that are still fighting, resisting, surviving and fucking thriving in our countries. I will follow you till the ends of the earth. Todo para el pueblo, siempre.

Revolutionaries die but the revolution don’t.- Yuri Kochiyama. Double whammy today (since it is the month to celebrate our API/A community and to celebrate all the mujeres) with the incredibly powerful ‪#‎YuriKochiyama‬. Everything about this woman oozes strength. In her early 20s (following the detention and death of her father, who the FBI believed was Japanese spy), Yuri was incarcerated and placed in a Japanese internment camp in Arkansas. Based on her experience of oppression in the camps, her awareness of social justice peaked and the activist vein within her started pumping hard. Once released, she moved to Harlem and as the civil rights movement started gaining momentum, her commitment to social justice deepened. From organizing boycotts as part of the Harlem Parent’s Committee in order to demand a thriving educational environment for inner-city kids, to working alongside the Republic of New Africa and other Black liberation orgs, there’s nothing she didn’t do. Her entire life was dedicated to activism, particularly focusing on denouncing US imperialism, doing organizing work to liberate political prisoners, and pushing for the US government to publicly recognize and apologize for its injustices toward the API community, specifically the Japanese internment camps. She also shared a friendship with Malcolm X (if you look at images of Malcolm’s death, you’ll see she was at his side, cradling his head when he passed). Yuri passed away last year at 93 years young. Immense gratitude and respect for your work toward liberation and solidarity. Rest in power, you radical soul

I got my civil rights!- Marsha P. Johnson. The beautiful month of March is finally upon us, and with it comes the celebration of the mujer, past, present and future story. I wanted to start off with the powerful Marsha P. Johnson, one of the founders of STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) and an amazing activist. She is credited for being the first to fight back during the raid at the Stonewall Inn (which is now known as the Stonewall Riots). That was the night of her birthday. She and best friend Sylvia Rivera, worked with the Young Lords and the Black Panthers on various occasions. They also made it their mission to actively organize around QTPOC issues such as police brutality and homelessness (they created a shelter for homeless qtpoc youth and drag queens). Marsha was a black, bisexual, gender non conforming woman, drag queen, sex worker and activist. Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson. Remember her name. If you didn’t know that trans women of color have always been at the frontlines of movements, now you do. Remember that. Trans women of color are most at risk of hate violence and police brutality and/or negligence. Remember that. 8 TRANS WOMEN, 7 WHO WERE OF COLOR, HAVE BEEN MURDERED IN THE LAST TWO MONTHS. REMEMBER THAT. And if your movement, or feminism or efforts of protection and liberation are not trans-inclusive or are constantly silencing and erasing the existence of trans folks OR if you are only angry when white or white-passing trans folks are being taken from us but do NOTHING when our black and brown trans siblings are being murdered, then you can get the hell out of here with that and get the hell away from me. ‪Marsha P. Johnson,‬ rest in so much power.

We have to learn to say the word “home” without splitting our tongues.- ‪Key Ballah‬. This whole month is ‪#‎wcw‬ on my IG and it’s still Wednesday somewhere so #wcw it is. Truth time- Pooh is completely crushing on Key Ballah’s poetry. If you don’t know who Key is or if you’ve never read any of her poetry, go visit her website, keywrites.com, and immediately after you’ve gotten your fill of feelings for the night, mosey on over to your preferred online book dealer and buy her book (Preparing My Daughter for Rain: notes on how to heal and survive). It’ll be the best decision you make in the next couple of hours. This woman is an amazing powerhouse of poetry, emotion, beauty and magic. Hands down, she’s easily in my list of top 5 poets. All the love to you, @keyballah beautiful brown girl poet support badass artists of color always always always.

Mira como nos hablan de libertad cuando de ella nos privan en realidad.- Violeta Parra. This is the first Chilean making a debut in my series. Anita Tijoux, Victor Jara, Pablo Neruda, Isabel Allende, Jorge Gonzalez y la gente Mapuche will also be making appearances cos you know I have to rep my tierra linda. Time to pay homage to a fellow compa, la Chilenita cantautora Violeta Parra. Violeta has to be the most important female folk singer and storyteller of Chile. This woman lived through so much and you can hear that when you listen to her music. La lucha, la desafianza y una voz desgarrante that shakes you right down to your core. Linda Violetita que se fue p'al cielo. Gracias por tu voz, tu arte (she was a visual artist, as well) y tu fuerza de amar.

You give me the sweetest taboo, that’s why I’m in love with you- Sade Adu. ‪Sade‬ played a really big part of my life growing up. I think hers was one of the first CDs my mom ever bought when we first got to this country. I distinctly remember it being on repeat, and even though my mother didn’t have full grasp of English at the time, she still sang along as best she could. Music that makes you remember and that transports you to a specific time in your life is to be cherished. Almost 21 years later and here I am, still listening to this queen. Timeless.

Queen Mother Moore, born July 27, 1898

Queen Mother Moore was a Black nationalist and Pan Africanist leader in the U.S. for over 60 years. In the 1920s she was a member of Marcus Garvey’s United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), then in the 1930s joined the campaign to free the Scottsboro Nine and through that joined the Communist Party, which she was a member of until the party dropped its support for Black self-determination.

She organized the first Black rent strikes in New York City and helped form the Harriet Tubman Association, which worked to organize Black women workers including domestic workers. She was president of the Universal Association of Ethiopian Women and the Committee for Reparations for Descendants of U.S. Slaves. In 1955 she helped begin a campaign demanding that the U.S. government pay reparations to Black people for slavery and ongoing oppression. She joined Malcolm X’s Organization of Afro-American Unity. She was a founder of the African American Cultural Foundation, Inc., which led the fight against usage of the slave term “Negro”. In 1957, Moore presented a petition to the United Nations and a second in 1959, arguing for self-determination, against genocide, for land and reparations.

In the 1960s she was a founding member of the Republic of New Africa which advocated Black self-determination in the Black Belt South. Taking the first of many trips to Africa in 1972 to attend Kwame Nkrumah’s funeral, she was given the honorary name "Queen Mother” by members of the Ashanti people in Ghana.

Queen Mother Moore died in 1996 at the age of 98.

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

Why We Should Never Forget Malcolm X On His Birthday

The self-defined “Black Nationalist Freedom Fighter” Minister Malcolm X would have been 89 years old on May 19, 2014. While the American spin doctors have been largely successful in shaping a narrative of Dr. Martin Luther King into a two second sound bite of “I have a dream”, they have been less victorious in painting Malcolm into the corner of “By any means necessary”. The image makers of society are more than happy to dismiss Malcolm X and leave him in the dusk bin of history as irrelevant. These two iconic martyrs of the 1960’s era are still dangerous to the status-quo today in 2014, if properly researched and understood.

They both were real human beings, with strengths and shortcomings. They were not angelic figures without faults. They were sons, husbands, fathers etc. just like many of us. They both were apart of organizations, Martin (Southern Christian Leadership Conference), Malcolm (Nation of Islam, later Organization for Afro-American Unity & Muslim Mosque Inc.). These men didn’t not operate as lone superstars, rather were key figures in their respective organizations and a larger movement with many formations.

Minister Malcolm X stood at the crossroads in many ways for great contributing groups to the African/Black community in America and around the world. Looking backward and forward in his life we will find him intersecting and influencing formations including: Universal Negro Improvement Association, Nation of Islam, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Black Panther Party, Revolutionary Action Movement, Republic of New Africa, African Independence Movements/Countries, Civil Rights and Black Power formations of all stripes. His analysis and communication skills are worthy of our attention today.

The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley, his speeches “Message to the Grassroots” and “The Ballot or the Bullet” are good starting points for study. It is our responsibility to define for ourselves who and what is important in our history. Minister Malcolm X is very important, happy birthday ancestor!

Written by Kofi Taharka

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Brother Malcolm “ El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz” X

youtube

Robert F.Williams on Black Seft Defense - RNA

our #LIVESOS album is now out in Australia, Austria, Bosnia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Fiji, Finland, Germany, Macedonia, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland !! it comes out everywhere else on Monday. WE HOPE YOU LOVE IT x http://po.st/jrctxd

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Watch on ausetkmt.tumblr.com

Firing Line with William F. Buckley Jr. “The Republic of New Africa”

If You are a Student of The Black Revolution Watch This - and Reblog

This is a very important Historical Document for Black Revolutionaries. This is one of the only known Television interviews of The President of the Republic of New Africa - Milton Henry / Omari Obadeli. 

huffingtonpost.com
10 Things You Didn't Know About Rosa Parks

1. Parks had been thrown off the bus a decade earlier by the same bus driver – for refusing to pay in the front and go around to the back to board. She had avoided that driver’s bus for twelve years because she knew well the risks of angering drivers, all of whom were white and carried guns. Her own mother had been threatened with physical violence by a bus driver, in front of Parks who was a child at the time. Parks’ neighbor had been killed for his bus stand, and teenage protester Claudette Colvin, among others, had recently been badly manhandled by the police.

2. Parks was a lifelong believer in self-defense. Malcolm X was her personal hero. Her family kept a gun in the house, including during the boycott, because of the daily terror of white violence. As a child, when pushed by a white boy, she pushed back. His mother threatened to kill her, but Parks stood her ground. Another time, she held a brick up to a white bully, daring him to follow through on his threat to hit her. He went away. When the Klu Klux Klan went on rampages through her childhood town, Pine Level, Ala., her grandfather would sit on the porch all night with his rifle. Rosa stayed awake some nights, keeping vigil with him.

3. Her husband was her political partner. Parks said Raymond was “the first real activist I ever met.” Initially she wasn’t romantically interested because Raymond was more light-skinned than she preferred, but she became impressed with his boldness and “that he refused to be intimidated by white people.” When they met he was working to free the nine Scottsboro boys and she joined these efforts after they were married. At Raymond’s urging, Parks, who had to drop out in the eleventh grade to care for her sick grandmother, returned to high school and got her diploma. Raymond’s input was crucial to Parks’ political development and their partnership sustained her political work over many decades.

4. Many of Parks’ ancestors were Indians. She noted this to a friend who was surprised when in private Parks removed her hairpins and revealed thick braids of wavy hair that fell below her waist. Her husband, she said, liked her hair long and she kept it that way for many years after his death, although she never wore it down in public. Aware of the racial politics of hair and appearance, she tucked it away in a series of braids and buns – maintaining a clear division between her public presentation and private person.

5. Parks’ arrest had grave consequences for her family’s health and economic well-being. After her arrest, Parks was continually threatened, such that her mother talked for hours on the phone to keep the line busy from constant death threats. Parks and her husband lost their jobs after her stand and didn’t find full employment for nearly ten years. Even as she made fundraising appearances across the country, Parks and her family were at times nearly destitute. She developed painful stomach ulcers and a heart condition, and suffered from chronic insomnia. Raymond, unnerved by the relentless harassment and death threats, began drinking heavily and suffered two nervous breakdowns. The black press, culminating in JETmagazine’s July 1960 story on “the bus boycott’s forgotten woman,” exposed the depth of Parks’ financial need, leading civil rights groups to finally provide some assistance.

6. Parks spent more than half of her life in the North. The Parks family had to leave Montgomery eight months after the boycott ended. She lived for most of that time in Detroit in the heart of the ghetto, just a mile from the epicenter of the 1967 Detroit riot. There, she spent nearly five decades organizing and protesting racial inequality in “the promised land that wasn’t.”

7. In 1965 Parks got her first paid political position, after over two decades of political work. After volunteering for Congressman John Conyers’s long shot political campaign,

Parks helped secure his primary victory by convincing Martin Luther King, Jr. to come to Detroit on Conyers’s behalf. He later hired her to work with constituents as an administrative assistant in his Detroit office. For the first time since her bus stand, Parks finally had a salary, access to health insurance, and a pension – and the restoration of dignity that a formal paid position allowed.

8. Parks was far more radical than has been understood. She worked alongside the Black Power movement, particularly around issues such as reparations, black history, anti-police brutality, freedom for black political prisoners, independent black political power, and economic justice. She attended the Black Political Convention in Gary and the Black Power conference in Philadelphia. She journeyed to Lowndes County, Alabama to support the movement there, spoke at the Poor People’s Campaign, helped organize support committees on behalf of black political prisoners such as the Wilmington 10 and Imari Obadele of the Republic of New Africa, and paid a visit of support to the Black Panther school in Oakland, CA.

9. Parks was an internationalist. She was an early opponent of the Vietnam War in the early 1960s, a member of The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, and a supporter of the Winter Soldier hearings in Detroit and the Jeannette Rankin Brigade protest in D.C. In the 1980s, she protested apartheid and U.S. complicity, joining a picket outside the South African embassy and opposed U.S. policy in Central America. Eight days after 9/11, she joined other activists in a letter calling on the United States to work with the international community and no retaliation or war.

10. Parks was a lifelong activist and a hero to many, including Nelson Mandela. After his release from prison, he told her, “You sustained me while I was in prison all those years.”

From Dr. Mutulu Shakur to Nobuko Miamoto

Nobuko,

From your last discussion concerning your visit to Yuri I yearned for her to be free, something that we do not like to say to each other. But most of my life Yuri’s spirit has been a comforting factor in all matters to our lives in struggle. A true ally and sister, friend and comforter. The last stages of her mental capacity must have been a task for her to comprehend. But knowing her and the many agendas she entertained, no thought, no statement, no directive did not have a precise objective. She was a person with a driving thirst to accomplish, and in her next life we better get on our p’s and q’s. She will be guiding our lazy spirits that yearn for rest. We must answer Yuri’s call and her example of a thriving spirit in all stages of existence.

She called my name and remembered my love for her. I am thankful. For me it’s an affirmation of the role she will play in my life at her next stage. I will always love her and remember her. Hear from you later Yuri. Enjoy the ride. I see your beautiful smile already.

Fate is a strange and twisted fiber that runs through the material of our lives. The inevitable meeting between Yuri and I was not by chance. The combined destiny of our lives, at least for me, was spiritual. We followed each other in a dynamic evolution. I benefited extraordinarily from sister Yuri’s sacrifices and audacity in the struggle.

She became a bridge to her world that I did not know. I began to see through her eyes, meeting brothers and sisters of I Wor Kuen, discovering acupuncture from her introduction. And she followed me to places, unbeknownst to my then young mind, in search for the truth. As part of the Republic of New Africa, we went together to Mount Bayou Mississippi to El Malik. She followed to help me watch my steps, never untangling or disloyal to our collective fate.

I’m not missing you Yuri, for you are within me. Your life has set a standard with which solidarity is built. There are very few in the world that can compare a lifestyle I committed myself to over these years to give honor to your mentorship. I’m so thankful for your example. Much of what our struggle has accomplished, you have been a driving force. I am so thankful.

I take the prerogative to thank you for the many who are waiting for you in the universe, and the many who are unaware of your transition. We love you so very dearly. I will continue to follow your example, and spread that special love for life and justice all over the world.

It is said that still waters run deep. But your love, Yuri, was never still, yet very deep. Troubled waters was when you shined and made love manifest. Such love is always in the eyes of the stars.

We will never forget WA 6-7412. Look out comrades out there in the universe! Here she comes!!! What a show. And to the Kochiyama family, lest we forget, love goes on forever because it is born in a part of us that cannot die. I love you all and thank you for being Yuri’s rock and inspiration.

Love you always.
Stiff resistance,
Your brother,
Dr. Mutulu Shakur.

P.S.
For all the P.O.W.’S, P.P.’S, exiles and martyrs.

Dr. Mutulu Shakur is a Black nationalist political prisoner and acupuncturist. He is currently incarcerated in the U.S. Penitentiary, Victorville, in Adelanto, CA.

Today would have been Huey Newton’s 72nd birthday. His version of “stand your ground” was a little less popular in certain circles.

“The genius of Huey P. Newton; Minister of Defense, Black Panther Party. “Introduction by Eldridge Cleaver. Ministry of Information, [the Black Panther Party], San Francisco. [1970?], 31p., wraps, unobtrusive internal rubberstamp indicating withdrawal from a library, no other markings. Includes Newton’s message of welcome to Robert F. Williams, addressed as President of the Republic of New Africa, upon his return to the US in 1969. 

Via Bolerium Books

(from The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks by Jeanne Theoharis)

1. Parks had been thrown off the bus a decade earlier by the same bus driver – for refusing to pay in the front and go around to the back to board. She had avoided that driver’s bus for twelve years because she knew well the risks of angering drivers, all of whom were white and carried guns. Her own mother had been threatened with physical violence by a bus driver, in front of Parks who was a child at the time. Parks’ neighbor had been killed for his bus stand, and teenage protester Claudette Colvin, among others, had recently been badly manhandled by the police.

2. Parks was a lifelong believer in self-defense. Malcolm X was her personal hero. Her family kept a gun in the house, including during the boycott, because of the daily terror of white violence. As a child, when pushed by a white boy, she pushed back. His mother threatened to kill her, but Parks stood her ground. Another time, she held a brick up to a white bully, daring him to follow through on his threat to hit her. He went away. When the Klu Klux Klan went on rampages through her childhood town, Pine Level, Ala., her grandfather would sit on the porch all night with his rifle. Rosa stayed awake some nights, keeping vigil with him.

3. Her husband was her political partner. Parks said Raymond was “the first real activist I ever met.” Initially she wasn’t romantically interested because Raymond was more light-skinned than she preferred, but she became impressed with his boldness and “that he refused to be intimidated by white people.” When they met he was working to free the nine Scottsboro boys and she joined these efforts after they were married. At Raymond’s urging, Parks, who had to drop out in the eleventh grade to care for her sick grandmother, returned to high school and got her diploma. Raymond’s input was crucial to Parks’ political development and their partnership sustained her political work over many decades.

4. Many of Parks’ ancestors were Indians. She noted this to a friend who was surprised when in private Parks removed her hairpins and revealed thick braids of wavy hair that fell below her waist. Her husband, she said, liked her hair long and she kept it that way for many years after his death, although she never wore it down in public. Aware of the racial politics of hair and appearance, she tucked it away in a series of braids and buns – maintaining a clear division between her public presentation and private person.

5. Parks’ arrest had grave consequences for her family’s health and economic well-being. After her arrest, Parks was continually threatened, such that her mother talked for hours on the phone to keep the line busy from constant death threats. Parks and her husband lost their jobs after her stand and didn’t find full employment for nearly ten years. Even as she made fundraising appearances across the country, Parks and her family were at times nearly destitute. She developed painful stomach ulcers and a heart condition, and suffered from chronic insomnia. Raymond, unnerved by the relentless harassment and death threats, began drinking heavily and suffered two nervous breakdowns. The black press, culminating in JET magazine’s July 1960 story on “the bus boycott’s forgotten woman,” exposed the depth of Parks’ financial need, leading civil rights groups to finally provide some assistance.

6. Parks spent more than half of her life in the North. The Parks family had to leave Montgomery eight months after the boycott ended. She lived for most of that time in Detroit in the heart of the ghetto, just a mile from the epicenter of the 1967 Detroit riot. There, she spent nearly five decades organizing and protesting racial inequality in “the promised land that wasn’t.”

7. In 1965 Parks got her first paid political position, after over two decades of political work. After volunteering for Congressman John Conyers’s long shot political campaign,

Parks helped secure his primary victory by convincing Martin Luther King, Jr. to come to Detroit on Conyers’s behalf. He later hired her to work with constituents as an administrative assistant in his Detroit office. For the first time since her bus stand, Parks finally had a salary, access to health insurance, and a pension – and the restoration of dignity that a formal paid position allowed.

8. Parks was far more radical than has been understood. She worked alongside the Black Power movement, particularly around issues such as reparations, black history, anti-police brutality, freedom for black political prisoners, independent black political power, and economic justice. She attended the Black Political Convention in Gary and the Black Power conference in Philadelphia. She journeyed to Lowndes County, Alabama to support the movement there, spoke at the Poor People’s Campaign, helped organize support committees on behalf of black political prisoners such as the Wilmington 10 and Imari Obadele of the Republic of New Africa, and paid a visit of support to the Black Panther school in Oakland, CA.

9. Parks was an internationalist. She was an early opponent of the Vietnam War in the early 1960s, a member of The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, and a supporter of the Winter Soldier hearings in Detroit and the Jeannette Rankin Brigade protest in D.C. In the 1980s, she protested apartheid and U.S. complicity, joining a picket outside the South African embassy and opposed U.S. policy in Central America. Eight days after 9/11, she joined other activists in a letter calling on the United States to work with the international community and no retaliation or war.

10. Parks was a lifelong activist and a hero to many, including Nelson Mandela. After his release from prison, he told her, “You sustained me while I was in prison all those years.”

posted by: swearimnotangry