reproductive roots

Chakras Imbalances

Chakra is a Sanskrit word and it means “Wheel” or “Vortex” because that is what it looks like when we look at it. Each Chakra is like a solid ball of energy interpenetrating the physical body, in the same way that a magnetic field can interpenetrate the physical body.

The Chakras are not physical, they are the aspects of consciousness in the same way that the Auras are aspects of consciousness. The Chakras are more dense than the Auras but not as dense as the physical body.

Chakras interact with the physical body through two major vehicles, the endocrine system and the nervous system. Each of the seven main Chakras discussed here are associated with one of the seven endocrine glands and also with a particular group of nerves called a Plexus.

Thus, each of these Chakra’s can be associated with particular parts of the body and particular functions within the body controlled by that Plexus or that endocrine gland associated with that Chakra.

BASE/ROOT CHAKRA: reproductive glands. It is the centre of physical energy, grounding and self-preservation. The Root Chakra governs the back, feet, hips, spine and legs.

If you tend to be fearful or nervous, your Root Chakra is probably under-active. You would easily feel unwelcome. If this Chakra is over-active, you may be very materialistic and greedy. You are probably obsessed with being secure and resist change.

SACRAL CHAKRA: sexual organs, bladder, bowel and lower intestine. This Chakra is about feeling and sexuality. When it is open, your feelings flow freely and are expressed without you being over emotional. 


If you tend to be stiff and unemotional or have a poker face, the Sacral Chakra is under-active. You are not very open to people. If this Chakra is over active, you tend to be emotional all the time. You will feel emotionally attached to people and can be very sexual.

SOLAR PLEXUS CHAKRA: This Chakra is about asserting yourself in a group. When it is open, you feel in control and you have sufficient self esteem. When this Chakra is under-active you tend to be passive and indecisive.You are probably timid and don’t get what you want. If this Chakra is over-active you are domineering and probably even aggressive.

HEART CHAKRA: As the Heart Chakra is about Love, kindness and affection, when it is open, you are compassionate and friendly, you work at harmonious relationships.
When your Heart Chakra is under-active, you are cold and distant. If this Chakra is over-active, you are suffocating people with your Love and your Love probably has quite selfish reasons.

THROAT CHAKRA: The Throat Chakra governs the throat, thyroid, mouth, teeth, tongue and jaw.
This Chakra is about self expression and talking. When it is open, you have no problems expressing yourself and you might be doing so in a creative way. When this Chakra is under-active, you tend to not speak as much and you probably are introverted and shy. Not speaking the truth may block this Chakra. If this Chakra is over-active, you tend to speak to much, usually to domineer and keep people at a distance. You are a bad listener if this is the case.

THIRD EYE CHAKRA: This Chakra is about insight and visualisation. When it is open, you have a good intuition. You may tend to fantasize. If it is under-active you are not very good at thinking for yourself and you may tend to rely on authoritative people. You may be rigid in your thinking, relying on beliefs too much. You might even get confused easily. If this Chakra is over-active, you may live in a world of fantasy too much. In excessive cases hallucinations are possible.

CROWN CHAKRA: This Chakra is about wisdom and being one with the world. When this Chakra is open, you are unprejudiced and quite aware of the world and yourself.
If it is under-active, you are not very aware spiritually. You are probably quite rigid in your thinking. If this Chakra is over-active, you are probably intellectualising things too much. You may be addicted to spirituality and probably ignoring your bodily needs.

Info from: Healingfromtheheart.co.uk, Timothy Pope.

Here’s How We Can Bring People Together on the Abortion Debate

By focusing on “red states” and regional culture, Take Root has managed to create a space to talk divisive issues without the typical divisiveness. By expanding the conversation from just abortion to reproductive justice, they are able to create a space where advocates from several different fields can work together, rather than treating justice as a zero sum game. They explain their focus on reproductive justice as “the right to have children, not to have children, and to parent the children we have in safe and healthy environments.” This allows participants to “see the connections between poverty and food access in rural and urban environments, histories of coercive sterilization of women of color, the disparity in impacts of criminalization of drugs and its effects on families, gender self-determination and gender violence, and access to contraception, transition services, sexual health and consent information.” They even had sessions on climate change!

Industrial farming is one of the worst crimes in history

The fate of industrially farmed animals is one of the most pressing ethical questions of our time. Tens of billions of sentient beings, each with complex sensations and emotions, live and die on a production line

by Yuval Noah Harari

Animals are the main victims of history, and the treatment of domesticated animals in industrial farms is perhaps the worst crime in history. The march of human progress is strewn with dead animals. Even tens of thousands of years ago, our stone age ancestors were already responsible for a series of ecological disasters. When the first humans reached Australia about 45,000 years ago, they quickly drove to extinction 90% of its large animals. This was the first significant impact that Homo sapiens had on the planet’s ecosystem. It was not the last.

About 15,000 years ago, humans colonised America, wiping out in the process about 75% of its large mammals. Numerous other species disappeared from Africa, from Eurasia and from the myriad islands around their coasts. The archaeological record of country after country tells the same sad story. The tragedy opens with a scene showing a rich and varied population of large animals, without any trace of Homo sapiens. In scene two, humans appear, evidenced by a fossilised bone, a spear point, or perhaps a campfire. Scene three quickly follows, in which men and women occupy centre-stage and most large animals, along with many smaller ones, have gone. Altogether, sapiens drove to extinction about 50% of all the large terrestrial mammals of the planet before they planted the first wheat field, shaped the first metal tool, wrote the first text or struck the first coin.

The next major landmark in human-animal relations was the agricultural revolution: the process by which we turned from nomadic hunter-gatherers into farmers living in permanent settlements. It involved the appearance of a completely new life-form on Earth: domesticated animals. Initially, this development might seem to have been of minor importance, as humans only managed to domesticate fewer than 20 species of mammals and birds, compared with the countless thousands of species that remained “wild”. Yet, with the passing of the centuries, this novel life-form became the norm. Today, more than 90% of all large animals are domesticated (“large” denotes animals that weigh at least a few kilograms). Consider the chicken, for example. Ten thousand years ago, it was a rare bird that was confined to small niches of South Asia. Today, billions of chickens live on almost every continent and island, bar Antarctica. The domesticated chicken is probably the most widespread bird in the annals of planet Earth. If you measure success in terms of numbers, chickens, cows and pigs are the most successful animals ever.

Alas, domesticated species paid for their unparalleled collective success with unprecedented individual suffering. The animal kingdom has known many types of pain and misery for millions of years. Yet the agricultural revolution created completely new kinds of suffering, ones that only worsened with the passing of the generations.

At first sight, domesticated animals may seem much better off than their wild cousins and ancestors. Wild buffaloes spend their days searching for food, water and shelter, and are constantly threatened by lions, parasites, floods and droughts. Domesticated cattle, by contrast, enjoy care and protection from humans. People provide cows and calves with food, water and shelter, they treat their diseases, and protect them from predators and natural disasters. True, most cows and calves sooner or later find themselves in the slaughterhouse. Yet does that make their fate any worse than that of wild buffaloes? Is it better to be devoured by a lion than slaughtered by a man? Are crocodile teeth kinder than steel blades?

What makes the existence of domesticated farm animals particularly cruel is not just the way in which they die but above all how they live. Two competing factors have shaped the living conditions of farm animals: on the one hand, humans want meat, milk, eggs, leather, animal muscle-power and amusement; on the other, humans have to ensure the long-term survival and reproduction of farm animals. Theoretically, this should protect animals from extreme cruelty. If a farmer milks his cow without providing her with food and water, milk production will dwindle, and the cow herself will quickly die. Unfortunately, humans can cause tremendous suffering to farm animals in other ways, even while ensuring their survival and reproduction. The root of the problem is that domesticated animals have inherited from their wild ancestors many physical, emotional and social needs that are redundant in farms. Farmers routinely ignore these needs without paying any economic price. They lock animals in tiny cages, mutilate their horns and tails, separate mothers from offspring, and selectively breed monstrosities. The animals suffer greatly, yet they live on and multiply….

Read on:- http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/sep/25/industrial-farming-one-worst-crimes-history-ethical-question