representation of race

Something cringey I’ve noticed while re-watching my favorite sitcoms is the “other-ization” of minorities by simply using their ethnicity as a modifier. “It must’ve been that Indian food; oh it was the weird Korean place; oh it’s the weird Chinese brand.”

I think it can be totally cool to embrace and poke fun at relatable things about our myriad of cultures. But if the joke is just “say an ethnic name and that’s the joke,” that’s a cheap stab at the exotic and scary stereotype of “the other.”

I’ve seen this ethnic other-ized punchline in nearly every sitcom: Parks & Rec, Friends, Seinfeld, Brooklyn 99, The Office, Arrested Development. I love many of these sitcoms—but I cringe at the sudden exclusionary humor, especially about “weird Asian stuff.”

Asian punchline humor always has been low-hanging fruit and easy-mode for “comedy” writers because it will never see protest and seems harmless. Too many Asian-Americans follow along, just happy for the representation at all, and always in fear of looking like “we’re not team players.”

The next time you watch any sitcom, be on the look-out for random Asian/foreigner/exotic punchline. Sometimes it really is funny and I laugh too. But it’s also lazy writing, alienating, and reminds me as an Asian-American that I will always be seen as a second class invisible non-being.

i really love it when mixed race actors play characters who acknowledge they’re mixed (even if they have physical traits that don’t make their heritage obvious) like i love in parks and rec that april speaks spanish and talks about being puerto rican, i love how rainbow in blackish struggles with her biracial identity, i love how koen in cleverman feels disconnected from his people because his mother is white and vanessa hudgens’ character in powerless is also half Filipino - i love that this is happening more and more because growing up as mixed, so often you see mixed people in media and they’re portrayed as one or the other and its so important we create media that doesn’t encourage internalized racism and encourages mixed kids to accept their identities are both whole and multifaceted i just hope we see more mixed representation for mixed poc as well as poc mixed with white 

The thing I loved most about “Thin Ice” (and I loved the whole episode) was that when Bill expressed concern for her safety in 19th Century London, The Doctor didn’t wave it off (the way Ten did to Martha). She wasn’t the only Black person there like she thought she’d be, but that didn’t automatically mean she’d be OK. In The Shakespeare Code, Ten pointed to the two Black women, and that was it, it was a non-issue. And don’t get me started on how she was treated Family of Blood… Twelve made it pretty clear he would not allow Bill to be treated like that.

If you’re not into Doctor Who or quit watching it, this season is a good time to start up (again). It’s a fresh start (you don’t need to have seen previous seasons to follow it) and so far it’s seriously good.

It astounds me how often we fail at being able to comprehend two complex concepts at the same time.

I’ve been seeing this post going around in two forms, about how Rogue One (which I have yet to see, so please NO SPOILERS) has an extreme lack of women (including background characters). That’s a really good, important point to discuss. And then there’s a post bashing that same article, pointing to the fact that the film highlights many non-white men and dismissing the article as white feminism.

No.

Both of these may be correct.

The ability of a film to have great representation for men of different races, creeds, abilities and backgrounds does not for a moment contradict the inability of the film to have adequate representation for women of any race, creed, ability or background.

This is why I hate the “trash fire” all-or-nothing mentality. It cannot cope with the notion that something can be good and bad at the same time, in different corners and contexts. For example: something can be great for racial representation and terrible for LGBTQ+ representation. The former does not automatically make the thing great; the latter does not automatically make the thing terrible. (Key word: automatically.)

Not only that, things can have different meanings to different people based on their different experiences. For someone mixed race Asian-white, a main character like Chloe Bennet’s on Agents of SHIELD may be hugely important. For someone black, the show’s troubling history of killing off most of its black characters may be deeply problematic. Neither is wrong. 

Personal experiences shape our interpretations of things. Experiences are not universal. The world is not comprised of absolutes. The stunning lack of women in film (at every layer) intersects, of course, with the stunning lack of non-white people in film (at every layer), but neither is more or less important than the other. (Especially since the doubly stunning lack of non-white women in film is something we should talk about more.) It is not “white feminism” to point out that a film with ten character posters had only one devoted to a (white) woman (even if she is the lead), just because the remaining men are non-white. Nor is it misogynistic to appreciate the film’s focus on (male) non-white heroes.

Complex concepts can coexist.

So Netflix really out there cancelling out of the best shows? Sense8 was amazing, it had good LGBT representation, characters with different races and cultures, beautiful cinematography, interesting plots and an amazing writing.

They also had the nerve to cancel The Get Down earlier this month, a show were the cast was 99% Black/Latinx and now they are coming for the only diverse show left.

Netflix actually keep 13 reasons why that didn’t even needed a second season because it was legit only ONE BOOK, Hannah is dead and the 13 reasons are known plus the producers of the show ignored the warnings and got people wih mental illness suicidal but of course money and mainstream media speaks louder.

Sense8 and The Get Down deserved better. The LGBT community deserves better and so did the minorities represented in those shows. To everyone that didn’t got to see sense8 I recommend you to do so and fall in love with the beauty that was the show and the intriguing plot lines.

I understand that both series had a big budget but if the reason to cancel sense8 was the expensive locations then for anyone who watched the season 2 finale knows that for season 3 location wasn’t going to be an issue. PLUS Netflix did a terrible job promoting both shows so idk how they could’ve expected a bigger audience.

There are people who complain about gender/race/sexuality being “the defining characteristic” of female characters, LGBT+ characters, and characters of color, but have no problem at all with the fifty billion straight white cis male characters whose defining characteristic is being a straight white cis male.

It’s pretty messed up that non- straight/white/cis/male characters are automatically accused of “forced diversity” or “pushing an agenda” but straight white cis male characters are just allowed to be.

anonymous asked:

hey so i just saw a post that said steven universe is the worst kind of show because it's full of faux progression. it's supposed to have positive female and race representation, but the gems don't actually have any gender or race. and it's supposed to have positive lgbt representation, but there's only one canon healthy gay couple and they're rarely seen on-screen. what are your thoughts about this?

i feel like that kind of statement neglects both the crew’s intentions - which is to bring representation to cartoons - and how representation works. if thousands of girls see themselves, and feel like it’s ok to love like pearl, ruby and sapphire do, then a never-mentioned-in-show ‘technicality’ isn’t gonna stop that. if black girls find a role model in garnet, the gems being aliens isn’t gonna stop that. i don’t think the sci-fi angle ruins representation, and i feel the agender argument is often brought up to like… “de-gay” the show, which is ridiculous both because of the amount of gay non-binary people out there, and because the gems i mentioned have only shown attraction to other gems (/human women, counting mystery s).

Originally posted by l3luepearl

Originally posted by oathkeeper-of-tarth

Originally posted by mei-roses-and-blood

Originally posted by gayfandomblog

Originally posted by imabiggernerdthanyou

like… this isn’t subtle, debatable or baiting. it’s not trying to score “points” with anyone. it just exists, naturally, as a form of love in the show. and remember that steven universe isn’t a romance - it’s a kids show. there’s probably never gonna be a couple we see every episode. 

in the same vein, i feel rose quartz, lars and sadie are interesting, nuanced characters who are probably bisexual (especially rose, like… her interactions with pearl. all of rainbow quartz. crew statements. “both of you”). we have mr smiley and mr frowney, if you want confirmed gay human characters. if indian girls see themselves in connie, that’s representation. if kids feel like it’s ok to be neither a boy or girl, like stevonnie, that’s an amazing step forward too. it’s interesting to hear ruby and sapphire are “rarely” shown onscreen, considering how many complaints i’ve heard that we see them “too much” compared to garnet, and that their episodes focus “too much” on their relationship.

regardless, the representation is completely intentional. rebecca sugar is cartoon network’s first female show creator, and openly bisexual herself. plenty of the crew are non-white and non-straight, and they care deeply about creating more diverse cartoons. the crew have talked about this many times. they’ve been transparent about rupphire and pearlrose being canon. matt burnett said on stevonnie, after seeing how much they meant to people, that he now wants to include them in more episodes - this was way back in the day, and he’s since made good on that. they’ve also been clear they don’t want to take representation from anyone: it’s ok to think of gems as a “one-gender race”, and it’s ok to think of them as girls - they call each other girls, after all. 

you can argue about how those characters are portrayed, or how a certain issue is tackled, of course… but you cannot deny that the intention is there. the show’s representation in a mainstream cartoon is trailblazing in many ways, and no matter if you’ve suddenly decided su sucks because of whatever other reason, we should really give some credit where due. 

Why is it that people on Tumblr are content to have crumbs thrown at them? Why do they throw temper tantrums when adaptations or remakes don’t feature lazy race and gender bends when they could be lobbying for original characters who don’t have to ride the coattails of established white or male characters? The people here are so ass backwards.

It’s come to the point where I’m actually dreading new movie announcements, because the Problematic Police have to swoop in and be all “Well, now, why can’t Batman be played by a woman of color?”

smol-bon-bon  asked:

What made you wanna do drag?

I think drag is such a beautiful rebellious queer artform that meshes so many things that I love about art - performance, makeup, aesthetics, a telling of whatever story you want to tell. It’s something I’ve wanted to do since I was a kid, and quite frankly, did as a kid but I considered it cosplay but looking back, I was totally doing drag.

In its origins, it enabled queer people to live a fantasy they couldn’t live due to the restrictions and prejudice the LGBT+ community faced. It gave homeless queer people an ability to make a buck for food while also feeling beautiful and fabulous. It’s not just getting on stage, and doing a death drop. Yes a lot of it is performance, and nowadays drag is huge because of mainstream tv shows. But it started as a “fuck you” at cisheteronormative standards placed upon queer people, it was always us questioning what gender even meant and breaking down those walls of the gender binary and gender roles. It was always us sharing our own intimate queer experience with our community. 

I’m talking about drag as the artform. Naturally, with how big drag is, there are people who will be misogynistic, transphobic, etc but these people do not represent drag or what drag has done for SO many people and certainly 100% go against the founders of the art. I’m really fortunate to be in Miami cause the drag scene down here is so vast in its representation. All shapes, all races, all ethnicities, all gender identities, everything. They embrace with open arms whatever fantasy you want to create and immediately denounce those who try to be racist/transphobic/misogynistic/lesbophobic/biphobic/etc literally any type of prejudice is 100% not tolerated. That’s the drag community I know and the only one I’m ever willing to be a part of.

I started drag because I love theater, and I love costuming. But the draw that I had to drag was different than the draw I have for theater or constructing an outfit. Plays/Musicals don’t fulfill me in the same way Drag does and it’s because of that unique queer experience I mentioned earlier. I don’t see Andro Gin as a role, but as a facet that I couldn’t ordinarily express. I know they look like a creature, and is camp but there’s a lot of realness and truth behind his persona that’s very embedded in who I am as a person. I’m comfortable being AFAB so this isn’t me coming out as trans/nonbinary but I think as queer people there’s always more going on under the surface that’s more complex when it comes to our gender expression than cishetero individuals could understand. The friends and community I’ve gained from this art I’ll cherish forever. Their stories, their fantasy, their talent, has been such a treat to be a part of and cheerlead. And then to have that love reciprocated back? It’s just been an incredible ride. 

anonymous asked:

Hi. Sorry my English really bad. I see your thread on twitter about poc. Can me (white girl) say 'SH has much POC' so i not have to say 'sh have one chinese man, one half mexico half lebanese woman, etc.' Or is it mean to say? Please educate me!!! Thank in advance.

Okay, I’m going to clarify the proper use of the term people/person of color (POC).

Where does POC come from?
It’s important to note that the term of color came from people-first language so it would not be quite right to say POC women or POC actors. It’s not the worst if you do this but it’s still awkward in the “ATM machine” sense. You should instead say women of color or actors of color.

When can you use the term POC?
POC is a great term to quickly encompass all non-white people, especially when referring to instances where they appear as a group like your example with a diverse cast containing many different races and ethnicities. Using it in that case is 100% fine. 

When should you not use POC?
When referring to individuals or to media that speaks directly to a specific race, it’s important not to throw it under the umbrella of POC. Magnus is an Asian* bisexual; Moonlight is about a gay black man. These characters and stories speak specifically to certain groups, so designating it as overall “POC” media erases the individual race/ethnicity for whom the characters/stories speak to.

*Truthfully, even “Asian” is a bit of a large umbrella because Asians are a huge diverse group within themselves. Issues that affect East Asians do not always overlap with those that affect South East Asians do not always overlap with those that affect South Asians. For example, my sister, a SE Asian who is very light, does not have same difficulties moving through airport security as her husband does, who is South Asian.

Why is it not okay?
This erasure is significant because for several reasons:

1. It leads people to assume that POC can be interchangeable. And when people feel that one “POC” can stand in to represent “diversity” for all POC, it results in them thinking they’ve done enough to cast one or two brown people and call it a day. So when I talk about how I don’t have a lot of rep, I get given a long list of non-white characters as if to say, “You have these, why are you still complaining? Isn’t it enough?”

First of all, even with the entire list of POC it isn’t enough to make up for the number of white characters that have dominated media for decades and second of all, once you reduce that already small list to their individual races/ethnicities, there’s even less.

2. It results in people not understanding the specific stereotypes that apply to certain races/ethnicities. For example, Magnus is especially susceptible to desexualization and feminization as an Asian man so things that are okay to talk about with him (i.e. being very…large) would not be okay to do with a character who is a black man, as black men are frequently hypersexualized.

Why do POC sometimes use the term POC instead of their race then?
These questions spawned after Harry did, in fact, use the term person of color and I want to clarify that a person of color using that particular term to stand in solidarity with other people of color is completely different than white people using it to lump us all together. For those of us who aren’t white, I think it was clear to us what he was doing – underlining the importance of any LGBT+ POC being recognized over white LGBT+ – which is a nuance I guess gets lost when you are outside the community.

So yes, some of us under specific circumstances will choose to use the identifier POC rather than our specific race for purposes of solidarity. However, as I said in that thread, white people cannot stand in solidarity with us. They can only stand beside us as allies. So it carries completely different connotations when used by them. It only serves to throw all POC under the same umbrella.

Anyway, I hope this helps clear things up; I realize it can be complex and especially on social media platforms where people like to type shorthand, it’s easy to just throw it in wherever. And frankly, some of us are guilty of this, too. But basically, just remember that while diversity of all kinds is important to all people of color, each race/ethnicity has unique issues to overcome and unique experiences they identify with. So the continued use of POC as an umbrella perpetuates the idea that one “POC rep” is enough for all of us and meant to be shared among us, which is a concept that really needs to end if we are to further push diversity in media.

Valentina IS congenial and does not need to provide emotional labor to any of the other season 9 drag queens!

Farrah Moan is like the annoying ex that won’t leave you alone. If Valentina doesn’t fuck wit you, she don’t fuck with you. Also, Valentina has her own shit to take care of. From what it sounds like, Valentina is very aware of issues around representation, especially for Latinx 1st gen folk. She knows that its much bigger than her just lip synching on stage. She has a lot of pressure on her shoulders that the white queens on the show (yeah, Sasha Velour and others) cannot begin to understand. Valentina is the brown gay boy from the hood that “made it.” She’s trying her best to “represent us well” (whatever that may mean). So what if she didn’t get to know the other queens on the show? She was there to play the game. 

A famous line from the show is “This Is Not Rupaul’s Best Friends Race.” It comes from an intense fight and the line is used to justify why queens begin to fight in the competition. Valentina did not fight with anyone but STILL got torn apart because she did not “get to know anybody on the show” and did not participate in being “best friends on RuPaul’s Drag Race” with the rest of the drag queens.

Im sure Valentina has her familia, her main amigxs that she is centering first within this larger success (or at least I would hope so lol). She doesn’t need to bring people into her life if she doesn’t want to. If theres anything to learn from this is that we need to respect another persons space, time, availability and capacity to provide any type of emotional labor cuz that shit also varies depending on your class, ethno-racial background, immigration status, gender, sexuality ETC! 

anonymous asked:

Sorry if I'm bothering you but can you share why you think avatar is bad?

hoo boy man ur asking for a lot bc that show is a complete and utter M E S S. first, heres the main phrase my tibetan ass wants u to think about: its a show using asian/indigenous ppl and their devastating histories made by ignorant weeaboo white men. I want to write about it in detail bc i’ve always wanted to say something about this but never rly got around to doing it. maybe ill send this in letter format to the writers lol. anyways im going to split this up into parts. I’ll put a readmore bc its kinda long

@bryankonietzko take a nice long look if u still use tumblr lmao

Keep reading

Bless Steven Universe for

-showing an innocent boy/girl sleepover

-casual/confident child crushes

-healthy homosexual relationships

-agender representation

-extreme diversity in races/ positive use of usually negative racial stereotypes

-strong females/mostly female characters

-mostly POC characters

-original fantasy 

-original/non-overused plotlines

-extensive background and lore

-multiple strong characters with mental disabilities

-body positivity

-fleshed-out characters

-accurate reactions to real-world problems

-Garnet

-misogynistic characters viewed poorly

-rude/selfish characters viewed poorly

-content little kids find funny and older viewers find meaningful

-good messages about positivity and acceptance all around

listen

arabic women never get to see themselves ever. i cant think of one character other than Fareeha and Ana that is portrayed positively 

dont erase them being Arabic to suit your agenda, alright? They’re Arabic. Yes, they’re Egyptian, but they are not African American. Please listen to Arabic women when we tell you our thoughts and feelings on representation of people of our race. 

Dear Valentina, from another Mexican

The thing is you can say you “represent” something similar to Selena’s did in the 90s, and that your following is under represented in the media

I call bullshit, representation is Diego Luna stayed true to his accent in a Star Wars lead role, Becky G being the first LGBT super hero in a movie, Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu helped mother fucking Leonardo DiCaprio won his Oscar, Iñárritu fucking won best movie & director for like 3 years in a row in the Oscars, Alfonso Cuarón also did it, Emanuel Lubezki winning Oscars too, Gael García Bernal is fucking Mozart in the Jungle, Salma Hayek is being in the business for 15 years or so, even Obama send his regrets when Juan Gabriel passed away, THAT’S REPRESENTATION

Yeah you are a gay drag Queen and that’s really important in a Trump-era but what’s the difference? THAT THEY ARE DOING SOMETHING, you are just sitting there smiling and looking like Linda Evangelista, just being a tchotchke, get involved in something, politics, social movements, even learning one more song from Isabel Pantoja maybe ??

You are here and you are queer now get there or get lose ✌✌ póngase las pilas mija