renaissance influence

anonymous asked:

how do you come up with all the character designs??

To be completely honest, anon, I never follow a specific method when I draw character designs. Sometimes they’re done at completely random with no particular thought, and sometimes they’re done with specific characters in mind. But! With that said, I do have certain keys that I tend to follow.

The main key is to keep things interesting. But that’s more simple than said. What makes a character look interesting? What makes them stand out?

I’ll try to demonstrate my thought process as well as I can.

The first thing to keep in mind is to remember that your first design, even the finished version, is nothing more than a concept. Yes, even when it’s all done and you think it looks perfect, remind yourself that it’s not. Time will pass, and you will make adjustments at some point. Sometimes, it’ll be a complete redesign, and sometimes, it’s just a small detail. Either way, it’s important to remember that the design you end up with is, in fact, not the end result.

To some people it might help to draw out really quick scribbles of random designs to see which one speaks to you the most. I highly recommend this, and I’ve done this a lot! Again, my methods vary depending on mood or situation. From beginners to professionals, the scribble method works just as well. Here’s an example of some concept art of Dorian from Dragon Age Inquisition.

As you can tell, the artist tried out several looks on a model before settling with a design they liked. (Sighs… Teach me your ways, bioware…)

Some prefer to draw a model that they can draw the clothes on, some go completely wild, which is also perfectly fine, draw the “scribbles” in whichever way suits you, as shown here and here — just remember to keep it quick and simple; save the details for the design you end up liking the most!

  • (With that said, I want to mention that this tutorial will be more focusing on the design parts than the character appearance, because i feel like faces and bodies deserves it’s own tutorial (it’d be all too much for one post).)

Okay, let’s start designing. For the sake of demonstration, I’ll use two different ways of thinking and genres. On the left, I’ll draw a more ‘random’ design, going more on impulse rather than thinking of a certain character. The only thing I have in mind is that I want the genre to be Sci-Fi, so let’s call her that. On the right, I’ll try to keep a character in mind, with the genre being Fantasy for comparison to Sci-Fi, so let’s name him Fantasy. Remember, if you do have a certain character in mind, creating a character becomes much more complex, but more interesting. (In my opinion). You need to remember that what they do and who they are will, and must, show in their design in some way. Unless, of course, it’s purposely done the opposite, in which case you have to be even more careful. Remember, every detail will say something about them! For example, say a character loathes makeup. Why would they be wearing it? Unless you have a really good explanation, don’t draw them with makeup. Basic logic, and it would fit their character. (Note: NOT an excuse, if you do something just to ‘prove’ it to basic logic, then it’s an excuse. If it’s done intentionally and with good reasoning, then it will not come off as unwise.)

Back to the designs — I wanted to keep it fairly plain for the sake of easier explanation. Perhaps minor characters, or perhaps purposely down-played for the sake of character image. I wanted to give Sci-Fi a nice, strapless and form-fitting dress, I wanted her to look sweet, and I wanted Fantasy to be kind of creepy, eyes-on-you kind of guy, not someone who’s too fancy, but not lacking in money either since he knows his way around things. The way he rubs his fingers makes him seem kinda eager for something.

Does the designs I drew above translate any of this at all? As I can imagine you guessed: no, it does not. It just looks like Anyonewearing Clothes™ with hair doesn’t say much, either.  ™.

Perhaps if we add colour…

Colour theory will be a different tutorials altogether, but I’ll cover the basics. As you can see, these colours do not flatter each other, and it does not make the clothes look any more interesting. For Sci-Fi, I wanted her clothes to be cute and colourful, but she only ended up looking like I’ve dropped the basic colours of MS Paint on her. The reason why that is is because the hues do not differ from each other. If i were to make the drawing in grayscale, you would see little to no contrast difference between the colours. Even when you’re going for a certain palette, such as pastel, you must make sure that the contrast and hues are complementary. Only, only break this rule if you know about this rule already and have practiced it. You must learn the rules before bending them. Patience is key. You will learn to do your own method with time, but being ignorant and oblivious is poison if you want to improve. Don’t be afraid to matching darker colours with lighter ones, and don’t be afraid to play around with the hues. (For example, making the skirt more red than magenta, etc.)

Now, for Fantasy, I wanted him to seem like the guy who could afford expensive dyes, but he wouldn’t bathe in them (but he probably wants to). I wanted a vibrant red to show that knowing that red can be an aggressive or passionate colour, and is often also associated with danger or sex. Perhaps he has a violent nature, maybe he’s really passionate about something, or perhaps, he really loves to sleep with people. Judging by his body language and expression, some of those traits certainly seem to suit him. The colour most vibrant, the one to stick out the most, is the colour that will say the most about the characters. Secondary colours is just as important, too. The colours chosen, however? It makes him look like a badly decorated christmas tree. The problem is, like Sci-Fi, the lack of contrast and hue (you can barely tell the difference between the boots and the pants). Not only that, but also uncomplimentary colours. Green and red are two completely different colours, as is the case with many other colours. To make them more appealing to the eye, you need to adjust the contrasts between them, making one darker or lighter, and you also need to tone down the vibrance. Since I wanted red to be the primary colour, the vibrancy turned down would be the green colour, etc.

Now, the first step to making the design a bit more interesting is to look up references. I know, not too fun, but you can make it so. I highly recommend getting Pureref for this. While you can have your own design in mind, your own ideas, it always helps to look up references of pictures that inspire you. You’ll find things you would likely never have thought about on your own. The ideas with both Sci-Fi and Fantasy remains the same, but the tweaks made made them already more unique and stand out, and you’re starting to really see the look that you were going for. For Sci-Fi, I kept the strapless look, I even made the skirt form-fitting, and I even kept her boots. The difference was the silhouette. Don’t be afraid to go bold with your designs and shapes! Make them stand out! Chances are they aren’t as bold as you think. Yes, it’s the uncomfortable ‘go outside your comfort zone’ method. Trust me, after a while it won’t be uncomfortable. You’ll just have to believe in yourself and what you’re drawing. If you want to make unique characters, you need to think unique. You might have personally wanted to wear what Sci-Fi wore before, but she is, after all, not you. Even if Sci-fi is a more random design, you are drawing what she would wear, in her settings. Same with Fantasy. He, too, remains the same as before. He has boots, pants, and a shirt, just like before, but this time with more renaissance (?) influence. Instead of an ordinary collar, I gave him frills, hinting about his status, and added them on his sleeves as well. The shirt itself is a peasant blouse, and while I don’t imagine him being a peasant, it’s either saying that he’s more relaxed about the way he dresses, or, he’s not as rich as he’d like to be. For both of them, I also adjusted their hairstyles. I gave Sci-Fi some lovely, long hair with relaxed locks drooping down to enhance that sweet look I was going for. Fantasy got long hair as well, and while it has definitely been taken care off, judging by how slicked back it is, it’s not perfect, and intentionally so. Perhaps he doesn’t care — or maybe he he think it looks good as it is.

Don’t be afraid to make changes if something about the design doesn’t seem right to you. Does Sci-Fi’s dress really need to be sleeveless? Would Fantasy really walk around in a blouse? What would the differences you’ve made say about the characters? Giving Sci-Fi those details makes her look a little more dressed up — perhaps it’s a uniform of some sort?

Think about the limitations you have. If you’re drawing modern or historical characters, you will have to be more careful with how much you change with the look. Would the characters, in their settings, actually wear that? Would it suit the world the live in, does it suit the look you’re going for? Make careful decisions when thinking about this. If you need to make drastic changes, I suggest you start a new drawing entirely. Sometimes it’s better to start fresh to think fresh.

It’s worth mentioning, also, that when looking at references, if it okay to bend the rules, especially if it’s a fantasy or sci-fi setting. Use your references as inspirations, not as a hard must. Go by instinct, even if you have a character in mind!

Notice the repeated patterns. For Sci-Fi, there’s little hard-edged shapes, except around her shoulders and boots. This is why it reminded me of a uniform of some sort — notice, also, how her design has a lot of cut-outs, which is a repeated pattern as well. For Fantasy, I decided to make his design overall more sharp, with a lot of pointed shapes. I made the sleeves loose, to make him look just a little less formal, and with buttons as well for a repeated pattern.

Remember to add accessories! They might be subtle, and to so some even unnoticeable, but they are important, and they are noticeable in their own light. You won’t notice the rings of a character who has their hands in their pockets, but as soon as they bring the fingers to their lips to giggle, you’ll certainly notice them when they are big, and shaped like skulls. No accecories says a lot about the characters as well. Disney’s Rapunzel does’nt not even have shoes — no accessories whatsoever, but Flynn Rider, however, has very visible belts, straps and a pouch. What does that say about them? Why does a thief need pouches? Does the girl locked indoors all her life need jewelry to decorate herself with and shoes to protect the floor from being covered in mud? Accessories are statement pieces, even from the most simple ribbon to a thick, studded, leather belt. I feel like Sci-Fi would enjoy taking care of her hair, so I put more volume to her hair and added hair pins to show that. With that, I added gloves and a rather odd bracelet — since i felt her outfit looked like a uniform of some sort, but not a professional one, but perhaps a game promoter, I wanted to finish that off with some ‘unneeded’, stylistic gloves. With Fantasy, I added add a big ribbon to his hair, to bring more light to his status, while keeping a few careless hairs in front of his face. In addition to this, I decided to add big, bulky rings, but also keeping a very small, subtle necklace hidden behind his frilled collar, and some decorations on his boots as well, repeating the pattern on his jacket for a finished look.

Note that small details such as these can be tricky if you’re an animator, hence why in cartoons details like these are either not existent or extremely simplified — if you don’t animate, there’s no reason for you not to add details. Don’t limit yourself!

It’s worth mentioning that bigger garments, such as outerwear, capes, etc, will make more of an impact and statement once you finish the design. The more space they take, the more important they will seem. As a general rule, one should save this for main and supportive characters and their villains. That’s not to say that minor or background characters can’t have capes and jackets — it all depends on how you draw them, how much space they take, and how much detail and thought you’re giving them. It doesn’t also mean that important characters all need large garments, but it’s definitely something worth keeping in mind.

And this is how the ‘finished’ look ends up like. It’s not perfect, and certainly needs more work (more time and effort!) but it certainly stands out more than the first example I showed you. Notice how the same palette was used, but keep in mind what I said about the hue and the contrasting colours. They’re less in-your-face now, and more complimentary. Naturally, shading is extremely useful if you want to finish the looks, because it allows you to add more details and more texture to the designs. 

With that said, when you colour, you might notice that you want to add more to your character designs — such as the green stripes on Sci-Fi, or the vivid, red details on Fantasy. 

However, as mentioned before, note that this is not the finished result. It’s a concept, and it should not be overthinked or overworked. Once you’ve spent a certain amount of time on one design, let it go and work on a new one later. You may draw the same design again, but improved, or you might find yourself draw a new design entirely. Both are fine and both options should be explored and tried out!

I hope that helped you. ♥ If you want to check out more of my tutorials, you can find them here.

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100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #54

Playboy Magazine Artists:

Erich Sokol (1933-2003) Doug Sneyd (1931-) 

Rowland B. Wilson (1930-2005) Eldon Dedini (1921-2006)

Edmond Kiraz (1923-)

Country: Sokol; Austria. Sneyd; Canada. 

Wilson, Dedini; USA. Kiraz; Egypt, France

Famous for: Playboy Magazine illustrations, cartoons, gag strips, comics, pinup artwork, animation, character design

Influenced: Arthur Pins, Shane Glines, Jon Kricfalusi, Bruce Timm, Disney Animation, 

Influenced by: Renaissance sensibilities, Fashion Illustration, Newspaper Comics, Book Illustration, Editorial Illustration, Political cartoons

Though (obviously) primarily focusing on photos of nude and semi-nude women, Playboy Magazine became a great avenue for illustrators and cartoonists across the globe, employing some top talents such as the ones listed below. Many of these artists were the first to combine humorous cartoon illustration with a more erotic edge, before the advent and explosion of the underground comic movement.

Erich Sokol: Born in Vienna, Austria, Erich Sokol had an interest in art from an early age, and contributed illustrations to many Austrian and German publications. Beginning in the late 1950s, he became a regular contributor to Playboy Magazine as a result of his prowess in painting heavily stylized and attractive female characters. Sokol passed away in 2003 and has since become one of Austria’s most celebrated cartoonists and draftsmen.

Doug Sneyd: Starting work as an artist at some of Canada’s largest advertising studios, Doug Sneyd is one of Playboy’s most prolific artists, with a slew of over 400 gag cartoons appearing in the publication since 1964. As with most Playboy cartoonists, his work is embodied by a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor coupled with appealing stylized characters and caricatures.

Rowland B. Wilson: Born in Texas, Wilson was a gag cartoonist and production artist for many leading publications, including Playboy and TV Guide, Esquire, The New Yorker and more. As time went on, Wilson also created pre-production concept artwork for some of Disney’s features such as The Little Mermaid, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Tarzan and Hercules. 

Eldon Dedini: Dedini was yet another one of Playboy’s mainstays, often injecting elements and characters of fantasy and mythology into his illustrations. Besides Playboy, Dedini worked for many other publications, including The New Yorker and Esquire. Dedini studied at the Chouinard Institute, where many of Disney’s veteran artists were formally trained in the arts. Dedini passed away in 2006 at the age of 84. 

Edmond Kiraz: Born Kirazian in 1923, Kiraz is an Armenian cartoonist and illustrator from Cairo, who later emigrated to post WWII Paris. He would begin his career with more politically-oriented cartoons, later switching to humor, leading him to work for Playboy. Kiraz developed a very distinct visual style, combining a very sophisticated color palette and design sense with quirky, heavily stylized and elongated fashion-illustration-like figures.  

A Peek at the Food of Terratus.

Since I love world-building and food, I figured a post looking at the food and agricultural products in Tyranny was something that I had to do. I’m listing ingredients and crops here, but could be persuaded to come up with a cuisine and meal post much, much, later.

Because the game takes place mostly in the Tiers, most of this information may be only pertinent to them, if something can be linked back to the North or the rest of the Empire, I’ll make sure to mention it. Another thing to note is that a decent number of the consumable items use art assets from Pillars of Eternity, a very different setting with different influences, and that makes it a little murkier to interpret how it could fit into Tyranny’s setting.

The format will be a list (again) of named edibles found or mentioned in-game, separated into food groups. And thanks to everyone who helped me with this list or tolerated my yammering about it, you know who you are!

NOTE: VERY MUCH A WORK-IN-PROGRESS, I WILL ADD MORE IF I FIND MORE, LIKE MY OTHER LORE POSTS

WARNING: MILD TYRANNY SPOILERS

Keep reading

Michelangelo and Mucha?

Michelangelo was without a doubt one of the most influential artists in the history of Western Art. His paintings and sculpture had a pronounced impact upon the work of his peers and successors for several generations. This can be clearly seen in the work of Raphael…

Sebastino del Piombo…

Daniele da Volterra…

Giulio Clovio…

Pellegrino Tebaldi…

Vincenzo Danti…

Francesco Salviati…

Rosso Fiorentino…

Bronzino…

Allesandro Allori…

Tiziano Vecellio (Titian)…

Tintoretto…

Juan Fernández Navarrete…

Frans Floris…

Hendrick Goltzius…

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio…

Domenico Zampieri…

Sir Peter Paul Rubens…

The Rococo and Neo-Classicism witnessed a decline in interest in Michelangelo’s work which would have been seen as too dramatic… even “vulgar” for the tastes of the time. With the onset of Romanticism, there was a “Ri-conoscere”… a rediscovery and acknowledgement of Michelangelo’s genius. We clearly see the Italian Renaissance master’s influence in the works of Delacroix…

Théodore Géricault…

Henri Fuseli…

William Blake…

Jean–Baptiste Carpeaux…

Auguste Rodin…

Michelangelo’s influence continued well into the 20th century. The grandiose superhuman forms… and the explosive movement or dynamism of Michelangelo’s figures can be seen echoed in the work of many Modernist artists… including Aristide Maillol…

Henri Matisse…

Diego Rivera…

Fernand Henri Léger…

Max Beckmann…

… and on through Lucian Freud…

… and contemporaries such as Daniel Ludwig:

I never thought in the least, however, of Alphonse Mucha as one of those artists that was influenced by Michelangelo… in any shape or form. That was until today. In my own paintings I am currently making extensive use of pattern and decoration. Gustav Klimt and Alphonse Mucha… as well as Botticelli, this stunning painting by Robert Burns:

… Phoebe Traquair…

and other artists are among those I frequently look at. As I browsed through a book on Mucha today I was suddenly struck by these two paintings:

As I looked at these two paintings I was suddenly struck by how much they seem to echo Michelangelo’s Libyan Sibyl:

Mucha’s print, Topaz, from the series on Gemstones even seemed to pick up on Michelangelo’s use of color in the draperies. Reversed…

… the similarity seems even more obvious. 

Of course it could all just be coincidence… the parallels that I see could all but be in my mind’s eye. But then again… thinking on Michelangelo… I was struck by another manner in which his paintings share a resemblance to the graphics of Mucha. Both artists have little interest in placing the figure in a believable realistic space. Unlike Raphael, Titian, Leonardo, or most other painters of the late Renaissance, Michelangelo has little use for landscape or background. He remains a sculptor in the sense that the human form… its motion or gesture… is all. Where Rembrandt speaks through the face… and the suggestion of emotions comes through facial expression…

… Michelangelo speaks through the gestures of the human body… almost as if he were a choreographer and his super-human figures dancers:

Mucha shares this expression through the movement of the human body with his great Renaissance predecessor. I have long been struck by the manner in which Mucha’s works convey movement… almost the elegance of dance… albeit far more “feminine” than that of Michelangelo. Of course he employs far more decorative elements… patterns, flowers, draperies, and halos…

Certainly, I would not begin to suggest that Mucha is anywhere near the same level of artistic genius as Michelangelo. What I am suggesting is that I see a shared interest in expression through the movement of the human body first and foremost… something that I strive for in my own work as well.

4

Highclere Castle is a country house in Hampshire, England. Highclere Castle is the country seat of the Earl of Carnarvon, the Herbert family. In 1692 Robert Swayer bequeathed a mansion at Highclere to his only daughter Margaret, the first wife of the 8th Earl of Pembroke. Their second son Robert Sawyer Herbert inherited Highclere, began its picture collection en created the garden temples. His nephew (and heir) Henry Herbert was created Baron Porchester and 1st Earl of Carnarvon by George III. Between 1839 and 1842 the house was remodeled and largely rebuilt for the 3rd Earl by Sir Charles Barry. The house is in the Jacobethan style reflecting the Victorian revival of English architecture of the late 16th and early 17th century, when Tudor architecture was being challenged by newly arrived Renaissance influences. In 1878 the interiors of Highclere Castle were complete. In 2009 the castle needed major repairs, with only the ground and first floors remaining usable. As of late 2012 the Earl and Lady Carnarvon have stated that a dramatic increase in the number of paying visitors has allowed them to begin major repairs. This increase in visitors is obviously a reaction to the major success of Downton Abbey. Highclere Castle is used as the Grantham Estate in this period drama.   

People who rail on the quality of Disney’s visual design vs. the quality of its concept art just… don’t know what they’re talking about. It’s so easy to cherry-pick pieces of concept art you think are “prettier,” point at the finished product, and say “THIS IS LAZY AND DISNEY SUCKS”

Like by all means Disney sucks in many ways but don’t use those valid criticisms to dredge up petty complaints that show nothing but complete ignorance of how animated movies are made and blatant disregard for the amount of work that goes into the process

Concept art is supposed to be rougher, looser, and more grandiose than the finished product. It is the product of several artists putting all of their time and energy into creating visual ideas that, after months and months of reworking, are decided on and put into the film. If a concept artist has an idea it is their job to turn it into an image. Keep in mind that concept artists are (usually) not animators. They can pour all of their talents and energy into creating one concept piece. The job of the animator is to make that come to life, and sometimes that’s simply not possible for them to with certain concept designs do given time and budget restraints. What a concept artist spends hours on, the animator has to spend MONTHS on. So the concept work needs to be easy ENOUGH to turn into a moving image. Not easy. Easy ENOUGH

To use a specific example of concept art vs. the finished product, let’s look at the often-lambasted Tangled. Claire Keane is an amazing painter, greatly influenced by renaissance styles, and that shows in her concept work for Tangled. The results are gorgeous. But they’re commonly juxtaposed to images from the finished film and presented as superior visuals that, for no reason other than sucking, Disney chose not to put in the film

That’s simply not the case though. There are so many factors that prevent concept pieces from being fully recreated in a film, from the nitpicking of executives deciding what a film needs to be profitable (remember that corporate Disney and Disney Animation Studios are not entirely the same beast), to the technical limitations of computer animation. Everything you see in a finished product was created by someone who spent countless hours creating it. Nothing and I mean NOTHING in animation is simple. Even if something looks simplistic, it’s not. Which is why complex concept designs have to be watered down. The filmmakers need to decide on the best elements of the concept art and streamline them BEFORE animation even begins. The final product being a simplified version of the concept art is NOT laziness

Also, as with almost all issues the studio is blamed for, Disney is not the only guilty party. Y'all could dredge up concept art for aaaany other studio’s films and the differences between finished product and concept art would be just as vast in most cases. If you’re gonna criticize this aspect of animation, stop pretending Disney is the only studio that does this JUST because you feel like railing on it

Disney has some serious problems and I’m not here to excuse or defend that. And sometimes you just see something in concept art that you think would have been cool. There’s nothing wrong with that. But this is such a pointedly-petty argument that demeans the work of so many artists and shows a wide lack of understanding of the complications of making animated films

imo the renaissance was influenced as much by the rise of capitalism as it was by the ideas of humanisim but take a wild guess which one your AP history textbook wants to focus on