reminder of the wars

being reminded of what prowl was like before the war just makes me…really sad. sure, he was always hard to get along with, but he cared about people. and i’m sure he still does, but it’s buried under four million years of moral compromises and “doing what needs to be done.”

i know a vacation isn’t gonna undo the effects of a lifetime of war, but i hope prowl’s time on luna-1 helps him recapture some of that compassion

Empire’s End confirms that Armitage Hux is not some poor child who was raised to be cruel, but instead chose to be so on his own.

This becomes plain when he is given his first command of fellow children. He sits alone in a room with his peers and decides to test his authority. His first order is this: “I want you to hit the boy to the right of you. Hard.”

The boy obeys immediately, and Armitage “feels a strange and sinister buzz of excitement” as he watches the boy bleed.

He could have issued any command: “take off your shoes and give them to me”, “quack like a duck”, or even “shut your eyes”. He chooses none of these, and instead moves immediately to violence. His goal is to cause harm to others–and it is a goal that is not influenced by anyone else. It is his choice. The decision rewards him with excitement and a thrill, and thus the foundation for his character is born: a cruel, sadistic monster who revels in genocide and hurting the innocent. 

3

February 19th 1942: Japanese internment begins

On this day in 1942, US President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 which allowed the military to relocate Japanese-Americans to internment camps. A climate of paranoia descended on the US following the attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan, which prompted the US to join the Second World War. Americans of Japanese ancestry became targets for persecution, as there were fears that they would collude with Japan and pose a national security threat. This came to a head with FDR’s executive order, which led to 120,000 Japanese-Americans being rounded up and held in camps. The constitutionality of the controversial measure was upheld by the Supreme Court in Korematsu v. United States (1944). Interned Americans suffered great material and personal hardship, with most people losing their property and some losing their lives to illness or the violence of camp sentries. The victims of internment and their families eventually received an official government apology in 1988 and reparations began in the 1990s. This dark episode of American history is often forgotten in the narrative of US involvement in the Second World War, but Japanese internment poses a stark reminder of the dangers of paranoia and scapegoating.

happy star wars day! friendly reminder that marcia lucas edited the original trilogy and literally saved them from being a complete mess. these films would be nothing without her. it was nonsensical, with underdeveloped characters, and she worked tirelessly. she made them what they are, and gets no credit because she’s a woman, and she’s george lucas’ ex wife. so happy star wars day to marcia, the true unsung hero of these nerdy space movies 💓❤️

I still miss you but it’s not the same anymore. I won’t call and I refuse to let my hands reach out for you because I have learned the hard way that you are not a place I can rest upon. You were never a safe place for me to reside in and there was nothing sacred about the way you disarmed me if it was only for your convenience. I became soft for you. I lost my fear of stepping out into the open and I did it for you. I never should have. I should have retrieved my heart on the day where all the casualties began to pile up on my side of the battlefield. And even then, in the death of everything good that I used to be, I still found ways to love you. Maybe they weren’t always good. But I did my best. Even from here, years after the soil has forgotten all the blood I spilled there, I am still loving you in the only way I know how- with my hands at my side, a phone call log that doesn’t remember your phone number and a heart that still loves you but has grown too tired to try to make a home amidst your war zone.

10

It’s interesting because Star Wars continues to evolve and George when watching that scene, he really liked it, but then he went “Uhhh, we have to take that scene out.” “Why, George?” “Because the Sith can’t become ghosts. That’s not what they do. They’re so concerned with their corporeal existence, and wealth, and power that they can’t think beyond that. They don’t think about the afterlife. That’s why they’re all afraid to die. That’s why they’re always trying to figure out how to cheat death.” […] So that scene was cut. But that’s the cool thing about The Clone Wars. It’s the last George Lucas produced Star Wars. And there’s so much you can learn about that mythology by watching that show very carefully.