rememberance,

Facts are facts, you can bury justice because you’re powerful, but truth has never had a grave in history, you can’t bury the truth.
— 

Assadour Guzelian, an Armenian whose family suffered during the Armenian genocide, discussing whether the genocide should be more widely recognised - following Turkish denials.

The forced march of Armenians being deported to Syria (source)

While there was sustained long-term persecution and confiscation of property, the genocide itself is said to have begun on the 24th April 1915, when the Ottoman Empire began the systematic extermination of its Armenian minority.  Up to an estimated 1.5 million Armenians were killed during the genocide, during death marches into the Syrian desert in a concentration camps which grouped Armenians together with little water or food and in numerous massacres and mass killings took place from 1915 through to the end of the First World War.  This April marks the 100th anniversary of the genocide.  

Sources:

Armenian Genocide of 1915: An Overview, New York Times, (source)
Armenian National Institute (source)

I saw the film Doctor Zhivago when I was 14 years old, growing up in Columbia, S.C. I was thunderstruck by the movie and its main character — the Russian poet-doctor Yuri Zhivago, played by Sharif.

The 1965 film, directed by David Lean, is based on Boris Pasternak’s novel set during the Russian Revolution. The film’s dramatic history, sweeping scenery and burning love story between Zhivago and Lara, played by Julie Christie, transfixed me.

I saw it over and over and fell madly in love with Yuri Zhivago. I even wrote to MGM asking for an 8-by-10 glossy photo of him.

I never heard back from the studio, but as I made my way to the Paris hotel where Sharif lived at the time, I carried in my bag a small wallet that I’d kept since high school.

In the front slot was a picture of Yuri Zhivago that I’d cut out of a magazine and laminated. I still had the wallet after all these years and thought I might show it to Sharif — and admit my girlhood crush.

Of course, he probably wouldn’t care, I thought. He was probably arrogant. And he certainly would have no time for such silliness.

After waiting downstairs for a few minutes, I was taken up to Sharif’s small suite.

When he opened the door, I thought he looked amazing. He would have been 80 or 81 at the time, but he still had those same emotion-filled, penetrating brown eyes.

There I was, with Yuri Zhivago.

Eleanor Beardsley: Fond Memories — And Regrets — On Learning Of Omar Sharif’s Death

Photo: Courtesy of NPR Correspondent Eleanor Beardsley

3

Korean War Memorial

Today a monument commemorating Britain’s involvement in the Korean War was unveiled in London.  The Korean War is frequently described as ‘The Forgotten War’ around the world, this is certainly the case in the UK.   

Between 1950 and 1953 the British armed forces contributed approximately 82,000 personnel to the UN Mandated intervention led by the United States.   Britain lost over 1,000 men killed during the war however, this is dwarfed by the larger human cost of the war with almost 3 million military and civilian casualties recorded.

The United Kingdom is one of the last major combatants to commemorate the conflict with an official memorial.  The Memorial itself consists of a bronze statue of a British soldier wearing a raincloak, with his Lee-Enfield Rifle No.4 slung and his helmet in hand.  Sculpted by Philip Jackson, the statue stands in front of an obelisk of portland stone with 'The Korean War 1950 - 1953 simply inscribed.  The memorial was paid for by the Republic of Korea in honour of the efforts of British servicemen during the war. 

Britain’s military personnel involved in the conflict were mainly drawn from the veteran cadre of the British Army and the thousands of young men who were serving their National Service.  Today, 320 veterans of the war were present for the unveiling of the Memorial, the culmination of many years campaigning for commemoration of their service.  

Described as 'The Forgotten War’ in part because of its inconclusive 'end’ and partly because it its general lack of media coverage and public recognition.  Even during the conflict the war garnered little attention from the war weary British public.  It is often said that it is overshadowed by the Second World War which preceded and, at least in America, the Vietnam War which followed it.   In a sad irony, the British press have neglected to widely cover the dedication of the memorial, but at least the conflict now has a lasting memorial.

Sources:

Images Source

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Kyle Vasquez, 16

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Daniel Rohrbough, 15

Today marks the 15th anniversary of the Columbine High School Massacre. When most people talk about the event, emphasis is put onto the shooters and questioning their motives. Rarely are the names of the victims shown. I’d like to ask that instead, the focus this time be on remembering the victims and their families. 

“Freddy was a talented editor and a trusted reader of some of George Plimpton’s finest work, including his best seller Paper Lion. She also worked intimately with a group of creative personalities, including Plimpton, Christopher Cerf, and Tony Hendra, on Not the New York Times, a spoof of the paper they put out when the Times was on strike in 1978.”

Remembering Freddy Plimpton

“I cried when I went to see Into the Woods. Yes, I cried during the sad part at the end, but I also cried during the opening number when the main theme starts and all the characters begin singing together, which isn’t even remotely sad. Into the Woods was the first musical I remember seeing when I was 8, and seeing the show that had changed my life so much, up on the big screen, for the entire world to appreciate, brought me to tears.”

Jonas Brothers are officially broken up
Jonas Brothers was the first band I fangirl’d over


Jonas Brothers was my first concert I was dying to go to


Jonas Brothers was also the best concert I have ever been to


Jonas Brothers introduced me to the life of a fangirl


Jonas Brothers were the reason why I was so close to one of my really good friends


All my walls were covered in Jonas Brothers posters


My 4year old brother was named Jonas because of my obsession


and now Jonas Brothers are over