release shows

what she says: I’m fine 

what she means: I don’t understand why they can’t professionally record broadway shows and release them to the public, there would be no need for bootlegs, broadway fans FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD could watch, it would help expand the theatre community and preserves something that is so beautiful and special to so many people.

9

Watch: This video of Black parents talking to their kids about police brutality will break your heart

Though this shouldn’t have to be the case, teaching their children to deal with the police is often a lesson that Black parents have to instill in their children at an early age. A heartbreaking new video released on Monday shows just what those conversations can look like. 

Gifs: WatchCut Video

Hey everyone, so if you don’t know what’s going on: yesterday, footage from Marvel’s Black Panther was released showing the romantic f/f relationship between Okoye/Ayo, characters from the comics the movie will be using as inspiration for the story. 

(x)

Of course, many fans were overjoyed to hear this, as we have been waiting for lgbt+ representation in MCU for a long time. However, Marvel has since retracted this, and released a statement saying that the relationship between these two women will not be depicted romantically:


This is more than disappointing to many, many people. We were teased with the possibility of representation, only to have it taken away from us. It’s long past the time for Marvel to step up and start telling more diverse stories, and we are tired of waiting. 

What can you do to help? Please, please, spare a moment to reach out to Marvel, their producers, representatives, etc etc, on twitter, using the hashtag #LetAyoHaveAGirlfriend. Social media is such an amazing tool and we can use it to make our voices be heard, and maybe make a change. I think it’s really important for us to try. 

Please take a moment to signal boost this post as well… the more awareness spread the better! It would mean the world to myself and so many Marvel fans if we were to have a canon, lgbt female character in the MCU.

Honestly?

No other show is going to make an impact on TV as much as The Legend of Korra. Like, go on, do your best. But having Korra – the main character, a tomboyish, bisexual, PoC who is mental ill and was physically disabled – end up with Asami – a beautiful, bisexual, saint of an heiress, who can kick ass despite losing both her parents, one of whom was a helping a bunch of terrorists – raised the bar so fucking high for both cartoons, tv shows, and even games when it comes to representation. 

Franchesca Ramsey lands Comedy Central pilot

  • On Tuesday, Comedy Central announced that comedian Franchesca Ramsey ( @chescaleigh on Tumblr) secured a pilot for an untitled project for the network.
  • According to Comedy Central’s press release, Ramsey’s new show will feature a set of comedians that will tackle some of the most pressing social and political issues.
  •  The project will “will heal America through brutal comedy, surprising guests, and breakdowns of the most pressing cultural issues you never knew you cared about,” the release said.
  • Ramsey will also serve as executive producer of the show, alongside Eric Brown, Andrew Kornhaber and Kara Welker. Read more (4/19/17)

NOTE: This post has been corrected. It previously stated incorrectly that Ramsey is the first black woman to have a Comedy Central pilot. Jessica Williams developed a show with the network in 2016. 

KPOP boy groups in 2020

bts: still so much teen angst. rapmonster ran out of novels to base the mv’s on, therefore their newest concept contains spongebob references., hoseoks face is now used as the sun on korean weather forecasts, jungkook has accidentally one a gold medal at the olympic games. twice.

ikon: haven’t had a comeback in years. YG claims they’re still working on it, but he actually put them somewhere in his dungeon, he can’t just remember WHERE

exo: all busy with their solo activities, the only thing they released this year is a compilation of baekhyun screaming while playing video games. still win ‘album of the year’

big bang: the korean anthem is now fantastic baby, the flag the poster for their next comeback. this is what happens when you let G-Dragon join the military

monsta x: still haven’t won on a music show, still release awesome music, but hey, they crafted their own awards now and are still doing their thing, so it’s okay

seventeen: have lost a few members. can’t have a comeback until somebody finds an explanation why they are still called seventeen. Woozi hijacked a recording studio and is now releasing his own music. 

shinee: since sm ran out of crazy ideas for their new album their next concept features ‘the cool and elegant tunes of minnesongs of the 11th century’. they still manage to involve hip thrusts and shirtless performances. so authentic. 

got7: bambam managed to become a huge internet meme, retired from being a singer because ‘he achieved anything he ever dreamed of’ 

Hexer | Pilot

Here it is, finally, Hexer’s Pilot! 

Trigger Warnings: Blood and Strong Language 

If you like what you see here then please think about contributing to our Kickstarter HERE 

Failing that, if you liked it, please share it where you can. That would be such a huge help to us!

We would really appreciate it. There’s so much more to come and we have the entire first series planned and ready to go. 

Also, to anyone who doesn’t feel like they’re represented in media we really hope you saw at least a little something here that made you say “Hey, that’s me!” because if so then that’s our job done. We promise that there is even more inclusion to come and we’re really excited to try and make it for you. 

Perhaps give this post a like, or like the pilot itself and if you can’t watch now then maybe add it to your Watch Later on YouTube :) 

We hope this was worth the wait, guys! 

Thank you so much for watching x

HAPPY BIRTHDAY EYCTE!

the last shadow puppets - everything you’ve come to expect // 01 april 2016

Can Conscious K-Pop Cross Over? BTS & BigHit Entertainment CEO ‘Hitman’ Bang on Taking America

On April 2, BTS played the fifth and final date of a sold-out U.S. arena run, performing to the shrieking fans who helped the group’s second full-length album, Wings, become the first K-pop project to crack the top 40 of the Billboard 200 in 2016. Since debuting in 2013, the seven-piece boy band has become a commercial behemoth in its native South Korea while continuing to make inroads within American pop culture. “Change,” an English-language hip-hop collaboration between BTS member Rap Monster and U.S. star Wale, was released three days before the kickoff of the stateside run.

“Change” touches on topics like voting rights and online harassment, while some of BTS’ biggest hits have addressed mental health. “Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically,” says BTS member Suga. Although K-pop music generally steers away from controversy, Rap Monster says that remaining outspoken “is important to us. And the bigger the voice we get, the more powerful our words become.”

A new BTS album is already underway and more U.S. dates might be on the way later this year. Bang Si Hyuk, the CEO and Executive Producer of label/management agency BigHit Entertainment who is better known as “Hitman” Bang, hints at “special features” designed for international listeners but thinks BTS will continue playing to its base.

“I’m not a believer in releasing full English songs to the U.S. market, like many K-pop artists have,” Bang tells Billboard in his first-ever interview with American press. “We must focus on what we do best as K-pop artists and producers and maybe add some special features to which international or U.S. music fans can feel attached. That is the best way for me to put K-pop into the mainstream U.S. music market and, in that regard, BTS will participate and perform in a way that is not much different from what they have been doing in the last three years. We’re adjusting and improving the way we do shows on the tour to meet the international or global level and expectations so that anyone, regardless of their culture and background, can enjoy BTS music and performances.”

Bang is sure to add that the group will be “very active and responsive in releasing new songs that would come out of collaborations with international artists, like 'Change.’” And, looking ahead, both the CEO and band see their most recent accomplishments as inspiration to achieve even more in the future.

“I’m so excited and thrilled at the response to the U.S. tour,” Bang says. “It’s still overwhelming and unbelievable at some point. I even further feel responsible for producing better music and production for fans around the world and I’d definitely think harder on what makes fans enthusiastic and passionate about BTS music and the band.” Meanwhile, the ambition within the group is perhaps best felt when member V winks that the group has “grander goals”; as if arena shows are just the beginning of what he and his band mates plan to accomplish around the world.

Below read on for an extended interview with BTS held before the tour kicked off. All member answers are taken via a translator except for Rap Monster.

With five arena shows, this tour is so huge and I think the main reason for that and why you guys are doing so well in America is because you sing about personal topics. Why is that so important to talk about in your music?

​Suga: Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically. I think that young people feel the same way about similar issues and BTS wants to cheer them up with our songs and talk about our feelings and social issues.

Rap Monster: These topics, like you said, they’re important, right? They should be told by someone. Someone should talk about it. And if someone should talk about it, then it feels like we have to talk about it. It’s very much an honor that we get power and attention from our fans them when we use our voices more. It’s important to us and the bigger the voice that we get, the more powerful that our words become.

These topics – loneliness, mental health, bullying – you don’t hear about in K-pop or even Korean culture much. Or, really, in American pop music either. Have you ever worried it might get a negative or opposite response?

​Suga: There are people who think negatively and there have been people who react negatively towards BTS’ music. But I think it’s way more important to make music with those issues because I think it’s important to encourage people to fight for those issues and, through the music, have a resolution for those issues. But I’m going to continue to talk about those issues through the music anyway. [Laughs]

Do you think K-pop needs to get more personal to gain a wider audience? Would you like to see that more in future?

Rap Monster: We still need some party songs, we still need some light love songs. I love to listen to them and feel the vibe from that. Everyone has their luggage and their shadows, but it’s up to everyone’s own [devices]. But we’re us. I think if we talk about it and if it gets more voice and attention, then maybe there are a lot of people in the world that accept us start to talk about those issues. I think that’s the change.

I thought “Spring Day” was a really big musical moment for you guys. Not only did it do really well on the charts, but this time you were showing a progression in thinking and a message of hope. The idea of recovering and winter moving to spring. Was that a conscious decision?

Rap Monster: It’s just like what you said, that was one step further. We’re always talking about the crises, the sorrows and youth’s feelings of getting lost. In many [television] programs, when we’d introduce our new album, I’d always talk about the word “recovery.” Like you said, it’s all about the recovery. Winter going to spring. The middle of the winter going to the spring. You got that.

​Suga: In addition to being what we are as BTS, we wanted to bring some changes and we actually wanted to evolve as a group. We wanted to show our many colors, but we still want to console others and give hope to others.

Something that was unique was all the solo songs on the Wings album. You’ve done mixtapes, but instead of full-fledged solo or unit releases, you got to show your different sides of yourselves. Why was that necessary?

Jin: The solo tracks were important because it was personal, an individual story and it was represented in the way that we are good at it. We worked a lot on each track and that’s why it was important to each of us.

Rap Monster: When I get questions about why is K-pop is so popular; I always tell them K-pop is like a great mix of music, videos, visuals, choreography, social media and real-life contents. Making the solo tracks on the album was quite a venture, but it’s connected to the concept. Like, when you watch the “I Need U” video, everyone has their own crises and characters. It’s kind of connected to our real personalities and characters, but the solo songs have their own characters and personalities. It’s all connected. It’s a mixture and that’s why people get interested in the concepts.

Speaking of solo songs, “Change” recently came out. Rap Monster, you and Wale are talking about different-but-similar issues when South Korea and America are both having interesting political times. Did you guys have a chance to discuss your different viewpoints?

Rap Monster: We didn’t have the time to get into it deeply, but I’m always watching the news about Trump and America; I always watch. When he first suggested a collaboration, I was like, “What should we do?” We could just do you know, a common hip-hop song, but I wanted to do a little more special. We have our political situation in Korea and the students are very angry. So, I think, if we talked about what’s going on, then we’ll have a real special collaboration. I think my guess was right and it became special.

Do you see or feel your influence among other groups in the industry?

​Jungkook: When we debuted back in 2013, we were influenced by our sunbaenim [Korean word for “senior”]. Over the years, as we watched other younger groups, we know they talk about us, they cover us and they follow us. I think they’re saying in interviews that they learned a lot from us and that makes us feel great. Being a sunbaenim, we want to be a good influence and be a better role model to other groups.

Last question, are you happy?

V: For now, we are very happy as we are, as a group, together. And I think we are happy because we are walking on the same path, walking the same direction. We wanted to get Daesang [Best of the Year award], but we have it already so our goal is to make great music, to share it with our fans.

Rap Monster: And a worldwide, stadium tour. That’s the goal.

V: We have grander goals.

© Jeff Benjamin @ Billboard

Beyoncé wins a Peabody Award for ‘Lemonade’

  • Congratulations to Beyoncé, whose visual album Lemonade continues to earn awards more than a year after its release. 
  • Alongside television shows like Atlanta and Veep, EW reported Thursday that Lemonade won a Peabody Award in the entertainment category.
  • According to its website, the Peabody Awards recognize powerful storytelling. 
  • Fun fact: Disgraced host Bill O’Reilly once lied about winning a Peabody.
  • The 2017 awards were announced just one day after old footage circulated of Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) calling out Bill O'Reilly — who was fired from his Fox News gig Wednesday — for claiming to win a Peabody Award when, in fact, he never did. Read more (4/20/17)

follow @the-movemnt

Note for USAians who have access to the Starz apps

Starz releases its shows for users of the apps at midnight on the day of airing.

Basically, you’ll get American Gods 21 hours before it airs on the cable channel. 

Use this information wisely.

[170406] Can Conscious K-Pop Cross Over? BTS & BigHit Entertainment CEO 'Hitman' Bang on Taking America

On April 2, BTS played the fifth and final date of a sold-out U.S. arena run, performing to the shrieking fans who helped the group’s second full-length album, Wings, become the first K-pop project to crack the top 40 of the Billboard 200 in 2016. Since debuting in 2013, the seven-piece boy band has become a commercial behemoth in its native South Korea while continuing to make inroads within American pop culture. “Change,” an English-language hip-hop collaboration between BTS member Rap Monster and U.S. star Wale, was released three days before the kickoff of the stateside run.

“Change” touches on topics like voting rights and online harassment, while some of BTS’ biggest hits have addressed mental health. “Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically,” says BTS member Suga. Although K-pop music generally steers away from controversy, Rap Monster says that remaining outspoken “is important to us. And the bigger the voice we get, the more powerful our words become.”

A new BTS album is already underway and more U.S. dates might be on the way later this year. Bang Si Hyuk, the CEO and Executive Producer of label/management agency BigHit Entertainment who is better known as “Hitman” Bang, hints at “special features” designed for international listeners but thinks BTS will continue playing to its base.

“I’m not a believer in releasing full English songs to the U.S. market, like many K-pop artists have,” Bang tells Billboard in his first-ever interview with American press. “We must focus on what we do best as K-pop artists and producers and maybe add some special features to which international or U.S. music fans can feel attached. That is the best way for me to put K-pop into the mainstream U.S. music market and, in that regard, BTS will participate and perform in a way that is not much different from what they have been doing in the last three years. We’re adjusting and improving the way we do shows on the tour to meet the international or global level and expectations so that anyone, regardless of their culture and background, can enjoy BTS music and performances.”

Bang is sure to add that the group will be “very active and responsive in releasing new songs that would come out of collaborations with international artists, like ‘Change.’” And, looking ahead, both the CEO and band see their most recent accomplishments as inspiration to achieve even more in the future.

“I’m so excited and thrilled at the response to the U.S. tour,” Bang says. “It’s still overwhelming and unbelievable at some point. I even further feel responsible for producing better music and production for fans around the world and I’d definitely think harder on what makes fans enthusiastic and passionate about BTS music and the band.” Meanwhile, the ambition within the group is perhaps best felt when member V winks that the group has “grander goals”; as if arena shows are just the beginning of what he and his band mates plan to accomplish around the world.

Below read on for an extended interview with BTS held before the tour kicked off. All member answers are taken via a translator except for Rap Monster.

With five arena shows, this tour is so huge and I think the main reason for that and why you guys are doing so well in America is because you sing about personal topics. Why is that so important to talk about in your music?

​Suga: Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically. I think that young people feel the same way about similar issues and BTS wants to cheer them up with our songs and talk about our feelings and social issues.

Rap Monster: These topics, like you said, they’re important, right? They should be told by someone. Someone should talk about it. And if someone should talk about it, then it feels like we have to talk about it. It’s very much an honor that we get power and attention from our fans them when we use our voices more. It’s important to us and the bigger the voice that we get, the more powerful that our words become.

These topics – loneliness, mental health, bullying – you don’t hear about in K-pop or even Korean culture much. Or, really, in American pop music either. Have you ever worried it might get a negative or opposite response?

​Suga: There are people who think negatively and there have been people who react negatively towards BTS’ music. But I think it’s way more important to make music with those issues because I think it’s important to encourage people to fight for those issues and, through the music, have a resolution for those issues. But I’m going to continue to talk about those issues through the music anyway. [Laughs]

Do you think K-pop needs to get more personal to gain a wider audience? Would you like to see that more in future?

Rap Monster: We still need some party songs, we still need some light love songs. I love to listen to them and feel the vibe from that. Everyone has their luggage and their shadows, but it’s up to everyone’s own [devices]. But we’re us. I think if we talk about it and if it gets more voice and attention, then maybe there are a lot of people in the world that accept us start to talk about those issues. I think that’s the change.

I thought “Spring Day” was a really big musical moment for you guys. Not only did it do really well on the charts, but this time you were showing a progression in thinking and a message of hope. The idea of recovering and winter moving to spring. Was that a conscious decision?

Rap Monster: It’s just like what you said, that was one step further. We’re always talking about the crises, the sorrows and youth’s feelings of getting lost. In many [television] programs, when we’d introduce our new album, I’d always talk about the word “recovery.” Like you said, it’s all about the recovery. Winter going to spring. The middle of the winter going to the spring. You got that.

​Suga: In addition to being what we are as BTS, we wanted to bring some changes and we actually wanted to evolve as a group. We wanted to show our many colors, but we still want to console others and give hope to others.

Something that was unique was all the solo songs on the Wings album. You’ve done mixtapes, but instead of full-fledged solo or unit releases, you got to show your different sides of yourselves. Why was that necessary?

Jin: The solo tracks were important because it was personal, an individual story and it was represented in the way that we are good at it. We worked a lot on each track and that’s why it was important to each of us.

Rap Monster: When I get questions about why is K-pop is so popular; I always tell them K-pop is like a great mix of music, videos, visuals, choreography, social media and real-life contents. Making the solo tracks on the album was quite a venture, but it’s connected to the concept. Like, when you watch the “I Need U” video, everyone has their own crises and characters. It’s kind of connected to our real personalities and characters, but the solo songs have their own characters and personalities. It’s all connected. It’s a mixture and that’s why people get interested in the concepts.

Speaking of solo songs, “Change” recently came out. Rap Monster, you and Wale are talking about different-but-similar issues when South Korea and America are both having interesting political times. Did you guys have a chance to discuss your different viewpoints?

Rap Monster: We didn’t have the time to get into it deeply, but I’m always watching the news about Trump and America; I always watch. When he first suggested a collaboration, I was like, “What should we do?” We could just do you know, a common hip-hop song, but I wanted to do a little more special. We have our political situation in Korea and the students are very angry. So, I think, if we talked about what’s going on, then we’ll have a real special collaboration. I think my guess was right and it became special.

Do you see or feel your influence among other groups in the industry?

​Jungkook: When we debuted back in 2013, we were influenced by our sunbaenim [Korean word for “senior”]. Over the years, as we watched other younger groups, we know they talk about us, they cover us and they follow us. I think they’re saying in interviews that they learned a lot from us and that makes us feel great. Being a sunbaenim, we want to be a good influence and be a better role model to other groups.

Last question, are you happy?

V: For now, we are very happy as we are, as a group, together. And I think we are happy because we are walking on the same path, walking the same direction. We wanted to get Daesang [Best of the Year award], but we have it already so our goal is to make great music, to share it with our fans.

Rap Monster: And a worldwide, stadium tour. That’s the goal.

V: We have grander goals.

© billboard

2

Richard Madden as Peter Leigh in Oasis

get this - a Thai show about gay love refuses to cast gay men in the roles of gay men (I know, unbelievable)

they (the organizer of the show) released a statement saying that they were searching only for straight actors because they felt they would fit the roles (of gay men) better

not only did they basically admit that they’re not creating their series for anyone but straight fangirls by saying something like that (because they can still ship themselves with the straight actors even if they somewhat or completely believe in their OTPs), they’ve also used a really popular, openly gay rising actor, Newyear Kitiwhut (part of an internet-famous Thai gay couple) to draw attention, only to drop him in the final stages of auditions (he brought in a lot of fans and supporters to the show by auditioning)

it also shows that they don’t really care about the content they are creating and the story they are telling, just the popularity of it (even if the organizer of the show is gay himself, he still only wanted straight men to play the roles)

you can read the full translation of the statement here + the opinion of the person who translated

the show is called 2Moons The Series