reducing mortality

6-Month Update for Trump Voters

So after six months, has he delivered what he promised you?

1. He told you he’d repeal Obamacare and replace it with something “beautiful.” You bought it. But he didn’t repeal and he didn’t replace. (Just as well: His plan would have knocked at least 22 million off health insurance, including many of you.)

2. He told you he’d cut your taxes. You bought it. But tax “reform” is stalled. And if it ever moves, the only ones whose taxes will be cut are the wealthy.

3. He told you he’d invest $1 trillion in our nation’ crumbling infrastructure. You bought it. But his infrastructure plan, which was really a giveaway to rich investors, is also stalled.

4. He said he’d clean the Washington swamp. You bought it. But he’s brought into his administration more billionaires, CEOs, and Wall Street moguls than in any administration in history, to make laws that will enrich their businesses, along with former lobbyists, lawyers and consultants who are crafting new policies for the same industries they recently worked for.

5. He said he’d use his business experience to whip the White House into shape. You bought it. But he created the most chaotic, dysfunctional, back-stabbing White House in modern history, in which no one is in charge.

6. He said he’d close “special interest loopholes that have been so good for Wall Street investors but unfair to American workers.“ You bought it. But he picked a Wall Street financier Stephen Schwarzman to run his strategic and policy forum, who compares closing those loopholes to Hitler’s invasion of Poland.

7. He told you he’d “bring down drug prices” by making deals with drug companies. You bought it. But now the White House says that promise is “inoperative.”

8. He said that on Day One he’d label China a “currency manipulator.” You bought it. But then he met with China’s president and declared "China is not a currency manipulator.”

9. He said he wouldn’t bomb Syria. You bought it. But then he bombed Syria.

10. He called Barack Obama “the vacationer-in-Chief” and accused him of playing more rounds of golf than Tiger Woods. He promised to never be the kind of president who took cushy vacations on the taxpayer’s dime, not when there was so much important work to be done. You bought it. But in his first 6 months he has spent more taxpayer money on vacations than Obama did in the first 3 years of his presidency. Not to mention all the money taxpayers are spending protecting his family, including his two sons who travel all over the world on Trump business.

11. He said he’d force companies to keep jobs in America. You believed him. But despite their promises, Carrier, Ford, GM, and the rest are shipping jobs to Mexico and China.

12. He said he’d create coal jobs. You believe him. He hasn’t. But here’s what he has done: Since 1965 a federal program called the Appalachian Regional Commission has spent $23 billion helping communities in coal states fund job retraining, reclaim land, and provide desperately needed social services. A.R.C. helped cut poverty rates almost in half, double the percentage of high-school graduates, and reduce infant mortality by two-thirds. Trump’s first proposed budget eliminates A.R.C.

Hattie Alexander (1901-1968) was a pediatrician and microbiologist, and one of the first scientists to ever study antibiotic resistance. She is best known for developing the first effective treatment against Haemophilus influenzae, a fatal disease for infants and young children.

She received her M.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1930, and went on to become an instructor and researcher for Columbia University. The antiserum she developed against the disease helped reduce mortality from 100% to less than 25%. In 1964 she became the first female president of the American Pediatric Society.

30 Things to Love About Exercise (None of Which Have Anything to Do with Your Weight, Your Size, or What You Look Like)

I got this from the book called  “ The Unapologetic Fat Girl’s Guide to Exercise and Other Incendiary Acts” by Hanne Blank. I found it both enlightning and motivational, so I decidd to share :)

1. Working out is an immune-system booster, which is great since no one actually enjoys being a mobile snot fountain.

2. Exercise builds ferociously sturdy little old ladies (and men): it’s fantastic for your bones, reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s, and improves balance and coordination.

3. Exercise reduces symptoms of both depression and anxiety. Organic, legal DIY mellowness is a pretty sweet side effect.

4. Working out helps regulate your blood pressure, reducing the effects of things like traffic jams and not being allowed to strangle that one coworker who really, really needs it.

5. Exercising makes you smarter: research shows that exercise incorporating complex movement, especially, makes people learn better and faster.

6. Working out hath charms to soothe the savage metabolic system, encouraging insulin sensitivity and making diabetes management a little easier.

7. Regular exercise tends to generate major mojo. And by mojo, I mean increased sex drive and sexual responsivity. Yeah, baby.

8. If you suffer from insomnia, exercise helps, and not just because it tires you out; it also helps your body regulate its own rhythms.

9. Workouts boost levels of neurochemicals like dopamine and serotonin, which is like getting a biochemical massage in terms of counteracting stress.

10. You’ll be able to sing louder and dive deeper with your improved lung capacity.

11. Your joints get stronger and less prone to injuries and diseases, including tricky ones like repetitive stress injuries and arthritis.

12. It enables you to satisfy those urges to reenact dance numbers from Broadway musicals. So what if you’re in the grocery store?

13. Will you be able to snatch a speeding bullet out of the air? Maybe not, but working out does improve people’s reaction time.

14. Endorphins—mmmmm, sweet, sweet endorphins: the “runner’s high” isn’t just for runners, ya know.

15. Outrunning the zombies.

16. It makes you strong. You never know when you’ll need to be that person who can carry the suitcase full of gold bars through the airport without anyone being able to tell that it’s so heavy.

17. Your body and your brain get superbly and thoroughly oxygenated, which tends to make you feel peppy and full of mischief.

18. Most of us like to think we’re flexible people who can roll with the punches. Exercising makes it more likely that it’ll literally be true, not just figuratively.

19. If, God forbid, you should get sick, being a regular exerciser can help reduce the length and severity of your illness. It has even been shown to reduce cancer mortality for some kinds of cancer.

20. Exercise can help pregnancy and labor go a lot more smoothly. Afterward, it helps you keep up with the kid.

21. Probiotics and antacids have their place, but if you want to give your digestive system the best possible advantage, there’s nothing like fiber, water, and exercise.

22. Physical competence—just knowing you can count on your body to do stuff effectively and without trouble—is pretty damn nice.

23. It makes your heart happy and efficient to the point that your resting heart rate may get lower.

24. Four words: Exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis— exercising can increase the number of mitochondria in your muscle cells, which is just completely geeky cool.

25. Stamina: “Another ten rounds? Sure,” you say. “Bring it … if you can.”

26. You’re much less likely to fall and much more likely to be able to get right back up and brush yourself off if you do.

27. It’s kind of nice not to think twice about getting down on the floor to look for that thing that just rolled under the entertainment center or about how you’ll get up again.

28. It’s eco-friendly. No matter how much you sweat or howhard you breathe, you will not produce toxic waste or greenhouse gases.

29. It gives you a bulletproof excuse. “Sorry, Aunt Linda, of course I’d love to hear all about your colonoscopy, but I have to go or I’ll be late to Pilates.”

30. Juicy ideas and spicy epiphanies seem to be attracted to sweat and gym socks. Moving your body is a fantastic way to jump-start your brain.

30 THINGS TO LOVE ABOUT EXERCISE (None of Which Have Anything to Do with Your Weight, Your Size, or What You Look Like)

1. Working out is an immune-system booster, which is great since no one actually enjoys being a mobile snot fountain.

2. Exercise builds ferociously sturdy little old ladies (and men): it’s fantastic for your bones, reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s, and improves balance and coordination.

3. Exercise reduces symptoms of both depression and anxiety. Organic, legal DIY mellowness is a pretty sweet side effect.

4. Working out helps regulate your blood pressure, reducing the effects of things like traffic jams and not being allowed to strangle that one coworker who really, really needs it.

5. Exercising makes you smarter: research shows that exercise incorporating complex movement, especially, makes people learn better and faster.

6. Working out hath charms to soothe the savage metabolic system, encouraging insulin sensitivity and making diabetes management a little easier.

7. Regular exercise tends to generate major mojo. And by mojo, I mean increased sex drive and sexual responsivity. Yeah, baby.

8. If you suffer from insomnia, exercise helps, and not just because it tires you out; it also helps your body regulate its own rhythms.

9. Workouts boost levels of neurochemicals like dopamine and serotonin, which is like getting a biochemical massage in terms of counteracting stress.

10. You’ll be able to sing louder and dive deeper with your improved lung capacity.

11. Your joints get stronger and less prone to injuries and diseases, including tricky ones like repetitive stress injuries and arthritis.

12. It enables you to satisfy those urges to reenact dance numbers from Broadway musicals. So what if you’re in the grocery store?

13. Will you be able to snatch a speeding bullet out of the air? Maybe not, but working out does improve people’s reaction time.

14. Endorphins—mmmmm, sweet, sweet endorphins: the “runner’s high” isn’t just for runners, ya know.

15. Outrunning the zombies.

16. It makes you strong. You never know when you’ll need to be that person who can carry the suitcase full of gold bars through the airport without anyone being able to tell that it’s so heavy.

17. Your body and your brain get superbly and thoroughly oxygenated, which tends to make you feel peppy and full of mischief.

18. Most of us like to think we’re flexible people who can roll with the punches. Exercising makes it more likely that it’ll literally be true, not just figuratively.

19. If, God forbid, you should get sick, being a regular exerciser can help reduce the length and severity of your illness. It has even been shown to reduce cancer mortality for some kinds of cancer.

20. Exercise can help pregnancy and labor go a lot more smoothly. Afterward, it helps you keep up with the kid.

21. Probiotics and antacids have their place, but if you want to give your digestive system the best possible advantage, there’s nothing like fiber, water, and exercise.

22. Physical competence—just knowing you can count on your body to do stuff effectively and without trouble—is pretty damn nice.

23. It makes your heart happy and efficient to the point that your resting heart rate may get lower.

24. Four words: Exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis—exercising can increase the number of mitochondria in your muscle cells, which is just completely geeky cool.

25. Stamina: “Another ten rounds? Sure,” you say. “Bring it … if you can.”

26. You’re much less likely to fall and much more likely to be able to get right back up and brush yourself off if you do.

27. It’s kind of nice not to think twice about getting down on the floor to look for that thing that just rolled under the entertainment center or about how you’ll get up again.

28. It’s eco-friendly. No matter how much you sweat or how hard you breathe, you will not produce toxic waste or greenhouse gases.

29. It gives you a bulletproof excuse. “Sorry, Aunt Linda, of course I’d love to hear all about your colonoscopy, but I have to go or I’ll be late to Pilates.”

30. Juicy ideas and spicy epiphanies seem to be attracted to sweat and gym socks. Moving your body is a fantastic way to jump-start your brain.

—  The Unapologetic Fat Girl’s Guide to Exercise and Other Incendiary Acts

The crystal… the light… the power… all of it… mine.

Before Lucis, Niflheim, Tenebrae, and Accordo, there was the single glorious nation of Solheim. Before the Caelums and Nox Fleurets, before the petty arguments of the Gods reduced the mortal realm to ruins, the Aldercapts governed Eos - then an advanced, prosperous, and united world.

The sapling civilisations that grew from the ashes were fertilised by Cosmogony - a pretty story detailing the rise of the new royal families, who called on the aid of the Gods to save them from God-made disasters. The so-called gifts bestowed upon these crowns were another layer of control to keep humanity under the thumbs of the Astrals, and Iedolas wondered why, traditionally, the Aldercapts were the only ones who understood this, the only ones who remembered the betrayal of the Heavens. Solheim served only mankind, as did Niflheim after it. The Aldercapts were the first kings of Eos, and Iedolas would be the last - the one true king, who would use the Gods’ own cursed artifacts against them and reclaim the world that was his stolen birthright, to finally wrench humanity free from the wile of the Gods.

By any means possible.

Sara Josephine Baker, or “Dr. Joe” to her friends, was a groundbreaking physician in the fields of public health and preventative medicine. After working for several years as a medical examiner and private physician in New York City, she became assistant to the commissioner of health in 1907. A year later, she was made director of the Bureau of Child Hygiene, where she implemented a number of programs aimed at reducing mortality rates among infants and children living in poor environments.

And behind the camera is Jessie Tarbox Beals, the country’s first female photojournalist, who kept a studio for many years in New York City. 

Jessie Tarbox Beals. Sara Josephine Baker. undated (circa 1910-1920). New-York Historical Society.

anonymous asked:

HC: far into the millennium, thousands of years in the future, an idea is proposed. 'the star's game' or 'woodsman's vines' is where two or more participants of supernatural decent or heritage try and trace back another's family tree to the point of the transcendence (or the current name for it in the time) and see how closely the participants are related. There are rumours that if a forgotten demon of time long past is played with this game, it would reduce it to mortal grief.

u all believe too many lies abt Venezuela, ofc its not socialist nor can it be socialist anytime soon, but even I can admit that virtually eliminating illiteracy in 7 years, reducing infant mortality by 1/3, increasing the number of ppl in higher education by 300%, reducing extreme poverty by 2/3, etc, is VERY impressive for a Latin American country under siege by US imperialism

Man sentenced God to death; by His Resurrection, He sentenced man to immortality.

In return for a beating, He gives an embrace; for abuse, a blessing; for death, immortality.

Man never showed so much hate for God as when he crucified Him; and God never showed more love for man than when He arose.

Man even wanted to reduce God to a mortal, but God by His Resurrection made man immortal.

The crucified God is Risen and has killed death. Death is no more. Immortality has surrounded man and all the world.

By the Resurrection of the God-Man, human nature has been led irreversibly onto the path of immortality, and has become dreadful to death itself.

For before the Resurrection of Christ, death was dreadful to man, but after the Resurrection of Christ, man has become more dreadful to death.

When man lives by faith in the Risen God-Man, he lives above death, out of its reach; it is a footstool for his feet: “O Death, where is thy sting? O Hades, where is thy victory?” (I Cor. 15:55).

When a man belonging to Christ dies, he simply sets aside his body like clothing, in which he will again be vested on the day of Dread Judgement.

Before the Resurrection of the God-Man, death was the second nature of man: life first, death second.

But by His Resurrection, the Lord has changed everything: immortality has become the second nature of man, it has become natural for man; and death – unnatural.

As before the Resurrection of Christ, it was natural for men to be mortal, so after the Resurrection of Christ, it was natural for men to be immortal.

By sin, man became mortal and transient; by the Resurrection of the God-Man, he became immortal and perpetual. In this is the power, the might, the all-mightiness of the Resurrection of Christ.

[…] Because of the Resurrection of Christ, because of His victory over death, men have become, continue to become, and will continue becoming Christians.

The entire history of Christianity is nothing other than the history of a unique miracle, namely, the Resurrection of Christ, which is unbrokenly threaded through the hearts of Christians form one day to the next, from year to year, across the centuries, until the Dread Judgment.

Man is born, in fact, not when his mother bring him into the world, but when he comes to believe in the Risen Christ, for then he is born to life eternal, whereas a mother bears children for death, for the grave.

The Resurrection of Christ is the mother of us all, all Christians, the mother of immortals. By faith in the Resurrection, man is born anew, born for eternity.

Justin Popovich (1894-1979; Orthodox Church):Paschal Homily @ Pravmir.

After that exchange with @raginrayguns over the mortality transition in Taiwan, I thought it’d be useful to do a ballpark estimate for the excess deaths resulting from the Communist victory in the Chinese Civil War.

Assuming that a counterfactual Nationalist China would have the crude death rates of Taiwan rather than the crude death rates of China between 1953 and 1979, the excess deaths from Communism are about 158 to 161 million.

Now, that isn’t appropriate or fair. It’s not appropriate because CDRs aren’t comparable across populations with different age structures – once you get to the 1980s It’s unfair because Taiwan had lower CDRs than Mainland China when the comparison started. 

We can also ask the question of how rapidly the Nationalists and Communists reduced its mortality from the same starting point. Because the Nationalists had 18 deaths per 1,000 in 1947, we might as well start there; the Communists had the same death rate a decade later, in 1957. So what happens if we start the clock running in 1957? How does that look?

Not great for the Communists. Something terrible happened between 1958 and 1961 that really threw the Communists off track. The Communists still have about 80 million excess deaths between 1957 and 1979, of which about 39 million are from period between 1958 and 1961.

Well, I guess you can’t win ‘em all.

Dippica Week Day 4: AUs

A finally on time fill for day 4 of Dippica Week. I’ve been looking forward to this day all week, as I am Reverse Falls AU garbage. Pacifica is just turning 17, and Dipper is late 16, almost 17. It gets a little steamy at points; warnings for mild innuendo, gratuitous making out, and unfortunate negging. Dipper is, as always when I write this AU, an asshole relentlessly trying to steal both Pacifica’s Journal and her heart. 



“Well, well, well, look who we have here…”

Dipper froze. A pair of lacy leggings still hung from one outstretched hand, and he held flashlight in the other. His mouth hung open, a comically delayed expression of shock.

“I knew this is where you’d wandered off to, Pines. Could you be more transparent?”

Keep reading

Sweetest of Dreams

Late-night television is a gamble. Sometimes there’s not much other than infomercials and outdated reruns of talk shows. Every now and then, she finds something worth watching. This is one of the latter nights, and an old Audrey Hepburn flick is playing on one of the channels. She’s sitting on the couch of her apartment, with a bowl of popcorn and a cup of chamomile tea, settled in to watch Sabrina.

Halfway through, as she is humming along to “Yes! We Have No Bananas” with Audrey and Humphrey Bogart, when her phone rings. Glancing over at it, she sees his name appear on the screen, and scrambles to answer it.

“Spencer? Is everything okay?”

“Oh, I – I didn’t think you would pick up,” he says. “Did I wake you?”

It’s nearly three AM, but she doesn’t want to worry him. “Not at all. I was up late finishing something for work. What’s wrong?”

On the other end of the phone, she hears him hesitate. “Just… just a bad dream, that’s all. I thought maybe having somebody to talk to would help, but…”

The television is muted, and she gives him her full attention. “If you want to talk about it, I’m right here. And if you don’t want to, then we can talk about something else.”

Work is a sensitive subject for him, and there are things he keeps from her in order to protect her. If it would make things easier on him, she would gladly hear his every story, but he insists there are some things she doesn’t need to know. “Tobias Hankel,” he says quietly. “That was the nightmare. I was back in that shed, and I couldn’t escape, and I just – it feels so real sometimes.”

The name is one she recognizes, from a case he’s told her only a little bit about. Almost ten years ago he was abducted and held hostage by a delusional serial killer for two days before his team finally found him. Most of the details he left out, but whatever happened in those 48 hours, it has continued to haunt him to this day. “I’m sorry,” she tells him. “What can I do to help you?”

“Just… just talk. Please?”

And so she does. Talks about everything, and nothing. What her day was like, what she’s thinking about, why Life is Beautiful is her favorite movie. Talks until he’s no longer responding, and she can hear only quiet, rhythmic breathing on his end. He’s asleep. Relieved that one of them is resting easier, she hangs up the phone. Spencer needs the sleep, needs to be alert and awake for the demands of his job. The late hours are something she can manage, or at least, she tries to. Characters jump to life onscreen when she unpauses the movie, losing herself in a good film and a lukewarm cup of tea.

In the end, she gets only four hours of sleep. Four isn’t the best, but it’s certainly not the worst. Standing under a cold shower helps to shake some of the fatigue, and a large cup of coffee – two shots of espresso – helps with the rest. In a strange way, her unconventional sleep schedule makes their relationship easier. There is never any adjusting when he’s away for work and calls her at odd hours. It’s easier for her to relate to his exhaustion. And when he needs her most, she’s there. Awake. Ready to listen.

Small victories, she decides. Where there are silver linings, she must seize them. It is not a silver lining, but an opportunity that falls her way that evening however. Spencer asks if he can come over, stay the night. Sometimes it’s harder being at home for him. The same place where after every case he has ended up, processing things alone. Pain, fear, guilt, regret. All those emotions have lived in the same four walls he inhabits.

Her apartment, at times, feels like a sanctuary for him. Full of good things, better things, than his room has housed. Never one to turn down a chance to spend time with him, she assures him it’s perfectly fine if he wants to come over. In truth, she’s all too happy to have him there. Spencer shows up at six, greeting her with a kiss. When his lips are on hers, there’s no need for caffeine. His touch, his very presence, has a way of waking her up.

“I prefer this much more to phone calls,” she says, and he laughs; a wonderful sound.

“There certainly are advantages to in-person interactions.”

“Like this.” She kisses him once more, slowly, savoring the sensation. They are interrupted by the ding of the oven timer. “And dinner.”

“Mm, yes. Both are good.” Spencer can’t cook to save his life, but is always happy when she does. Not that she minds, recipes always make much more than a single person can go through, and she would much rather have someone to share it with.  They eat together, then spend a long while on the couch with tea, just enjoying the time they have together. They catch up, hold hands, steal a few more kisses here and there.

When the sun has long since set over DC, they retire to bed, each a little reluctant, for their own reasons. Having Spencer there is comforting. So close she can hear the sound of his heartbeat when he pulls her to him. Arms strong and warm secure her there, and she lies still until he’s fast asleep. Then, very carefully, she extracts herself from the safety of his embrace. It’s not a matter of wanting to be away from him, so much as it is a desire not to wake him. She would happily stay there, but it’s only ten-thirty. It will be hours before she manages to fall asleep, and she’s got to keep her mind busy until then.

On the nightstand is Les Misérables, beckoning her to finish the last two hundred pages. A quick trip to the kitchen to fetch another mug of tea, the flicking on of a reading light, and she settles for another long night.

                                                      ><>< 

He bolts upright, awakened by the sound of his own scream. Pants and gasps for air, trying to slow his breathing and his mile-a-minute-heartbeat. He’s here. Here. Not in Georgia, not in that shack, not in a chair. In DC, in an apartment room, in a bed. But, he realizes, it’s not his own bed.

It’s hers.

“Spence?” Right on cue, she speaks up. Reid rolls over, expecting to see her half-awake, but it’s just the opposite. By the glow of a small book light, she is reading, a novel propped up on her knees. A cup of tea sits on the nightstand, and it looks as though she hasn’t slept at all. The circles under her eyes could rival his.

“What – what are you doing up?” he asks.

She glances over him furtively, like she’s debating the severity of the situation. “Couldn’t sleep,” she answers plainly.

“Do you ever?” The question is at first in jest, but when she bites her lip, several things fall together at once. The tired look in her eyes, her disdain for early mornings, the fact that she always answers his calls, no matter how late. Coffee is her drink of choice all day, but she keeps copious amounts of chamomile tea in her kitchen. Chamomile, best known for being a sleep aid. “You’re an insomniac,” he realizes. “Why didn’t you tell me?”

Y/N sighs, setting the book aside. Even when exhausted, he can’t help but find her lovely. Moonlight reflects in her eyes as she turns to face him. “I didn’t want you to worry about me. You’ve got enough going on as is. Besides, it’s a common issue, and I’ve dealt with it for a while.”

While 58 percent of the American adult population reported repeated trouble sleeping, it was still a concerning disorder. “Statistically, trouble sleeping can reduce your mortality rate by as much as 16 percent. Have you seen a doctor?”

“Yeah, but nothing seems to help much. With enough time, I’ve adapted. Really, it’s not a big deal. I just didn’t want you to worry about me. What about you? Nightmares again?”

Reid nods. “Tobias Hankel.” The same as all his nightmares lately.

For a moment, she debates whether to ask him another question. Making up her mind, she looks at him with an expression that seems to ask permission. “Why is it always him?”

He wrestles with his thoughts - she hadn’t told him about her insomnia so he wouldn’t worry, but he found himself frustrated that she couldn’t confide in him. The same thing he’s been doing all this time with his own experiences. Only now does he realize how lonely that felt. If she’s going to trust him with things, he needs to show her that he trusts her as well. “Listen, there’s something I’ve never I’ve never told you about that case.”

That gets her attention. She sits up straighter, waiting intently, curiosity plain on her features as he tries to find the right words. This never gets any easier, explaining it to someone. “When I was in that shack, I was… I was beaten, and tortured. When Tobias wasn’t himself, he was really violent. When he would come to, he’d see what had happened. Then he would try to make up for it, make things easier for me. He… he, um…” God, it’s harder than he expected with her. Because he doesn’t have to see her at work everyday, she doesn’t have to stay in his life, unlike his colleagues. But oh how he wants her to stay. This could be thing that scares her off, he knows that. If he doesn’t tell her though, and she finds out, it’ll be far worse. He exhales heavily, trying to rid his body of all doubt; runs his fingers through his hair. Sensing his discomfort, she reaches for his hand, holding tight to him. Giving him a little more courage. “He drugged me, with Dilaudid. It’s almost like heroin, but it’s easier to get. The team found me, but not until after I had to shoot Tobias in order to stay alive. And Dilaudid is incredibly addictive, so after he was dead I… I stole his supply in order to keep using. It almost cost me job, my friends. Everything. But – but I stopped. I haven’t used in nine years, ten months, and fifteen days.”

“Spencer…”

“I never told you because I didn’t want you to worry about me. I didn’t want to scare you. But I know now that I can trust you with it. I love you, Y/N. You know that, right?”

She wraps her arms around him, holds him close. “Yes. Yes, I do. And I love you to. Thank you for trusting me.” When she pulls away, she reaches for his hand once more. Not quite ready to let go completely. “I know your job isn’t easy. And I know there are things in your past that are hard to talk about. But whatever might keep you up at night, you can call me. Or stay with me. I’ll be awake to listen. I’ll be here.”

Reid realizes what she’s offering - a lifeline. To be there for him, at all hours. While he appreciates it, she needs rest too. No matter how hard it is to find. “How you considered medication to help you sleep?”

“Yeah, but I haven’t been able to find one that works. It’s like… it’s like I can’t turn my mind off at night. All these thoughts are running through my head, and I keep tossing and turning, and no matter how hard I try I just can’t seem to fall asleep. It’s been that way for a while.”

Sleep therapy can be expensive, but there are an abundance of home remedies. “What about things like yoga, or a hot bath before bed?”

Accompanying her nod is the sort of weariness that confirms she’s run the gambit of possibilities. “Anything you can think of, I’ve probably tried at one point or another. Nothing seems to work, not for very long at least.”

“What about sleeping with someone?” It’s a last ditch effort to help her in some way.

“What?” She furrows her eyebrows, confused.

Reid shifts, wets his lips as he tries to explain it. “There are studies that show sharing a bed with someone you love can improve overall health and quality of life. The psychological benefits can sometimes carry over into the physical realm. I mean, it’s just one study, but I just thought maybe it could help. To sleep with someone you feel safe with.” She looks at him, waiting for him to continue, and so he takes it as permission to ask. “Do you feel safe with me?”

“Of course,” she answers. Hesitates, then adds, “There’s nobody else I feel safer with than you.”

At that, his heart warms, and he can’t help but smile. She feels safe – no, safest – with him. “Then will you lay with me? It helps me too, being near you. So far, no nightmares.”

It’s true, this is the first time in a while he has slept so soundly. She settles back down with him under the blankets, close enough he can feel the warmth of her body. Briefly he wonders if she enjoys being held by him as much as he enjoys holding her. Somehow, he feels more secure when she’s in his arms. He kisses the top of her head, and they embark upon a potentially mutually beneficial sleeping arrangement.

It helps him, more than he had imagined. For Y/N, there seems to be no change, at least not at first. At night she feels more relaxed though, more content. And then, on the fourth night that he crawls into bed with her, it happens.

She closes her eyes. And falls asleep. As quick and simple as that.

No restlessness. No nightmares.

Only the sweetest of dreams. Only soft breathing and gentle embraces, and mornings spent waking up slow, blissfully wrapped in the presence of each other.

Tu Youyou 屠呦呦

(born 1930) Chemist and Nobel laureate

Tu Youyou and her team extracted a substance from sweet wormwood which proved effective in reducing mortality rates for people stricken with malaria. The discovery of Artemisinin has led to the development of a new drug that has saved the lives of millions of people, halving the mortality rate of malaria during the past 15 years.

Number 40 in an ongoing series celebrating remarkable women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

It’s simultaneously heartbreaking and validating when you’re in an exam and the proctor says to put your bags under the chair and you watch all these girls shove Gucci and LV totes onto the dirty gym floor it’s like no that’s so expensive but also. Yes that’s right….we are all mere mortals reduced to this, everyone’s bag is dirty on the ground whether it’s designer or a target tote and nothing not even money can help us now…

notes on the mistress of the labyrinth

Attempting to present a picture of a deity from Minoan Crete is a bit like wandering into a mysterious labyrinth and confidently declaring that you know what lies in wait at the center. It’s a fool’s game at worst, a risky and fumbling endeavor at best.

But I have my marching orders. For the past two months, Dionysos has been lending me his power and character for a project of my personal faith. Now he’s calling in his favor. In return for his patronage, I owe him a reconstruction of his wife. So into the labyrinth I go, in search of its mistress.

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WOMEN IN HISTORY: Hattie Elizabeth Alexander (1901–1968)

Hattie Alexander developed the first effective remedies for Haemophilus influenzae, reducing the mortality rate from nearly 100 percent to less than 25 percent. Alexander was also among the first scientists to identify and study antibiotic resistance, which she correctly concluded was caused by random genetic mutations in DNA.  In 1964, she became the first woman elected president of the American Pediatric Society.

I was reading a story written by an old guy about his life as a child and he mentioned a lot of casual whippings he got from various relatives for minor acts of disobedience, something that was completely normal at the time. He himself would never dream of whipping his own children or grandchildren, but why not?

Thinking about it I realised I know a ton of people who were subjected to various degrees of physical discipline as children and yet have no interest in applying that to subsequent generations. But in making this choice they are breaking a tradition of punishment which goes back hundreds of years, and I haven’t seen people talk much about why.

Are we more compassionate now? Do we conceptualise children differently? Has physical punishment been coded as a lower-class act, something that only the poor and ignorant would stoop to? (Or inevitably racially coded, in the US?)

Could it just be a reaction to the falling birthrate and reduced child mortality, where couples have fewer children and value them more?

But apparently we spend a heck of a lot more on pets and vets than we did in the past, so perhaps that’s being driven by similar forces.

How the heck did we all get so nice, so quickly?

Me: *volunteer at the animal shelter*

Me: *buys food for the homeless everytime I go to the supermarket*

Me: *do my best to help friends who are suicide survivors, CSA survivors, and domestic violence/abuse survivors, even if talking about it may be triggering for me*
Me: *donates monthly to Pastoral da Criança (Children’s Pastoral), an institution that aids poor children and fights to reduce child mortality here in Brazil and other countries*
Me: *ships something “problematic”*
People on tumblr: OMG YOU ARE A DISGUSTING PIECE OF TRASH GO KILL YOURSELF YOU HORRIBLE HUMAN BEING

anonymous asked:

Actually Australian and British fast food prices are significantly higher than their American counterparts, and the meals are much larger, and that's what's considered a problem. Fast food provides very little nutritional value but in America it's so widely available, and that's what the issue is. The drinks comparison might not be 100% accurate but it is demonstrating something entirely correct

Fast food actually provides a lot of nutrition. I know people like to use ‘nutrition’ as code word for ‘Good Food’, and being calorie dense, with carbs, sodium, trans fat, fast food sits firmly in the Bad Food category, regardless of nutritional content.

Yes, fast food tends to be calorie-heavy, but they’re not empty calories. I really don’t understand why people think a fast food bought burger is going to be devoid of nutrition while a home made burger is stacks of protein. You still have beef, veggies, bread. The same shit as when you make it at home.

Past that, I’m not even going to touch the nutrition side of fast food. It’s been done to death, and you can search tags and use google. Here’s a link to get you started: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/capital-commerce/2009/01/05/nope-mcdonalds-isnt-making-us-fat

They still need proteins, which to get the most out of, you MUST pair with a carbohydrate–the carb is fast burning energy, protein long burning.

I think it’s funny that even though fine dining is actually no more healthy, it’s a McDouble that’s always pointed at as the harbinger of the apocalypse.

Fast food is attacked because it is primarily consumed by poor people: day laborers, landscapers, the homeless, racial minorities, the disabled, fast food workers, undocumented people… People who -need- to get as much calories as they can for a dollar.

Yes, America has a diet problem. But it’s not too much fast food, it’s lack of fresh fruits and vegetables, because these come at premium prices. It’s how our food system works in general that’s causing problems.

But you right, there’s a real problem.

It’s a cheeseburger combo meal being 3, 4 dollars and a bag of spinach leaves (lettuce is actually lower in nutritional content than that McDouble) being 3, 4 dollars. That’s causing us problems.

It’s soda being cheaper to buy at the store than water is. (Nb4 ‘turn on the taps!’ It must be nice to live somewhere that drinkable tap water is a guarantee)

The real problem is workers being expected to work a 40 hour work week, even though studies have shown time and time again that it’s far from the most productive schedule…but does make the best consumers.

It’s food deserts, driving ten extra miles out your way for a fresh green bean or only a mile from your house for canned–soaked in salt, leached of a lot of nutrition, sugars added; it’s lack of public transportation; it’s the forced idea that if you aren’t functioning independently as a nuclear family you are a failure;

It’s student debt where even adjusted for inflation is more than keeping my generation from being home owners, the higher education business booming off us–public universities having increased tuition by 20% AFTER inflation in the five years between my eighth grade year and my junior year of high school, keeping us all pissing away what little money we have on rent that we have to split with a roommate, two roommates, three.

It’s minimum wage needing to be a minimum of $11 to have the same buying power as in the sixties, while those same fast food workers who are making that7.25 making that McDouble are doing a job that from my experience working as a CNA and as fast food is harder than the much praised job of both a CNA and a nurse

(that thank god a lot of fast food places give their employees one free meal per shift–there were so many times when that was all I ate that day–god knows I wasn’t looking for healthy, I was looking for 'what will get me through this shift and keep me from passing out?)

The real problem is living in a country where Harvard turned away a smaller percentage of applicants than a newly opened fast food restaurant

It’s parents both having to work 40 hour work weeks so they can provide for their child, meaning there’s no time or energy to make a meal that takes 2 hours prep time

It’s the prison industrial system, literally slave labor so that companies don’t have to pay minimum wage, it’s most convicts being put away for nonviolent crimes, for being drug addicts

It’s the US government intentionally introducing crack cocaine to poor black and Latino neighborhoods

It’s chemical pollution and lead paint levels being through the roof in the ghetto compared to a nice pretty suburb, leaving us even sicker and more tired and more susceptible to illness

The Real problem is Wells Fargo saying they’re giving free lessons to people from disadvantaged families on how to build generational wealth but really being revealed to be an attempt to trick black families into predatory loans

It’s the ongoing practice of redlining

It’s willful miseducation of our children, who are literally being taught that condoms make sex LESS safe, and it’s funded by your tax dollars

Your tax dollars, where schools are funded by a percentage of property tax, so the richer the neighborhood you’re from the better the education, guaranteed.

It’s Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals are actually shown to do the most significant damage to metabolisms found in pesticides

Pesticides that studies, hard science, has found to be linked to infertility, higher rates of miscarriage, cancer, birth defects. Killing the bees causing even more of a scarcity of fresh fruits and veggies that the rich don’t feel but we do.

It’s breastfeeding being discouraged so that parents are, through laws and social change, left with no options but formula, which doesn’t have half the nutritional value of breast milk, full of oils and chemicals and costing more than 200$ per month. Even though breastfeeding reduces infant mortality rates. It’s white parents being able to breastfeed more than black parents because of a unique for of economic coercion. Even though breastfeed children grow up healthier and stronger.

Yeah there’s a big problem with how food in America works, but a double cheeseburger doesn’t even come close to touching it, and be damned sure that attacking fast food doesn’t do shit to help the health of a nation.