red-blue-green

youtube

M O R O C C A N   S U N S E T   M A K E U P   T U T O R I A L 

These warm hues work so well for all eye colours, not just Brown.
Orange and Red are opposite Blue and Green on the colour wheel, also known as ‘complementary colours’.
So when you wear the complementary shade to your natural eye colour it will make them POP!
For those of you with Brown eyes, like myself, are fortunate as we’re are able to wear any hue.

All the products used have been listed and linked below: 

Too Faced Born This Way Foundation
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2s6Sabj
US: http://bit.ly/2s6UrTP

MakeUp Geek - Flame Thrower Foiled Eyeshadow
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2quCVYt
US: http://bit.ly/2rfJscH

MAC 286 Duo Fibre Brush:
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2rO04ZI
US: http://bit.ly/2rg4oA7

MakeUp Geek - Morocco Eyeshadow
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2rOgjFX
US: http://bit.ly/2quCInR

E25 Round Top Blending Brush - Blank Canvas Cosmetics USE DISCOUNT CODE: SHONAGH for 10% OFF
http://bit.ly/2s6J8Lf

MakeUp Geek - Bitten Eyeshadow
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2qutlF2
US: http://bit.ly/2rxsnf8

Sigma E47 Shader Crease Brush: http://bit.ly/2r4ttOc

MakeUp Geek - Americano Eyeshadow
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2quWUpG
US: http://bit.ly/2sdWqoG

NEVE Cosmetics Pigment - Compilation http://bit.ly/2rOuLxV

MAC 239 Flat Shader Brush
UK & Worldwide Shipping: http://bit.ly/29yNUv6
US: http://bit.ly/2quUdo7

Peaches & Cream ‘Famous’ Pigment http://bit.ly/2hTo1JO

MakeUp Geek - Peach Smoothie Eyeshadow
UK: http://bit.ly/2quXu6N
US: http://bit.ly/2rOz785

Sigma E36 Brush http://bit.ly/2qv5Ueo

Bobbi Brown Gel Liner - Sepia Ink
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2rFUdCW
US: http://bit.ly/2r4Gp6t

MAC 210 Liner Brush
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2se6g9U
US: http://bit.ly/2rxTkzc

Crown Brush - Smudger Brush http://bit.ly/2qELL8e

ZOEVA 317 Angled Liner Brush
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2rOwuTW

Too Faced Better Than Sex Mascara
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2rg3LGJ
US: http://bit.ly/2qEZH29

Natasha Denona Sculpt & Glow Palette
UK & Worldwide Shipping: http://bit.ly/2pLuxDo
US: http://bit.ly/2r6KJmu

ZOEVA 117 Petite Defined Buffer Brush
UK: http://bit.ly/2quGfm7
Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2quJomd

Crown Syntho Brush http://bit.ly/2pZIl19

NARS Laguna Bronzer
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2quKtKN
US: http://bit.ly/2qv0W1j

ZOEVA Luxe Sheer Cheek Brush
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2rO320i

MAC Sweet As Cocoa Blusher
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2qv0n7K
US: http://bit.ly/2rOJzwC

MAC Brick Lip Liner
UK & Worldwide: http://bit.ly/2quX1BF
US: http://bit.ly/2sdUzQw

anonymous asked:

Ok so, Host + Any of the Googles: Safe Search Red/Yellow/Blue/Green (ex. Safe Search Blue), Host + Dark: World Manipulation, Host + Bim: Stage Fright, Yellow Google (Oliver) + Bim: Spotlights, Red, Blue, or Green Googles + Dark: Incognito Mode Red/Blue/Green, Oliver + Dark: Sunshine Glitches, Any of the Googles + Dr. Iplier: Medical Assistance Red/Yellow/Green/Blue. That's all I got for now but I'll tell you if I come up with more or make adjustments! -SSM

I love all of these so much??! I honestly can’t which I love the most, they’re all so great. (Stage fright and sunshine glitches are particularly adorable)

New paint colors invented by neural network

So if you’ve ever picked out paint, you know that every infinitesimally different shade of blue, beige, and gray has its own descriptive, attractive name. Tuscan sunrise, blushing pear, Tradewind, etc… There are in fact people who invent these names for a living. But given that the human eye can see millions of distinct colors, sooner or later we’re going to run out of good names. Can AI help?

For this experiment, I gave the neural network a list of about 7,700 Sherwin-Williams paint colors along with their RGB values. (RGB = red, green, and blue color values) Could the neural network learn to invent new paint colors and give them attractive names?

One way I have of checking on the neural network’s progress during training is to ask it to produce some output using the lowest-creativity setting. Then the neural network plays it safe, and we can get an idea of what it has learned for sure.

By the first checkpoint, the neural network has learned to produce valid RGB values - these are colors, all right, and you could technically paint your walls with them. It’s a little farther behind the curve on the names, although it does seem to be attempting a combination of the colors brown, blue, and gray.

By the second checkpoint, the neural network can properly spell green and gray. It doesn’t seem to actually know what color they are, however.

Let’s check in with what the more-creative setting is producing.

…oh, okay.

Later in the training process, the neural network is about as well-trained as it’s going to be (perhaps with different parameters, it could have done a bit better - a lot of neural network training involves choosing the right training parameters). By this point, it’s able to figure out some of the basic colors, like white, red, and grey:

Although not reliably.

In fact, looking at the neural network’s output as a whole, it is evident that:

  1. The neural network really likes brown, beige, and grey.
  2. The neural network has really really bad ideas for paint names.
10

The pokédexholders

We Finally Understand the Meaning for the Colors of the ACOTAR Series

I’m sure I’m not the only one who had wondered why Sarah chose red, blue, and green. Well, I got my answer while reading ACOWAR.

“One by one, shields of red and blue and green flickered into life around the Illyrians and their weapons, overlapping like the scales of a fish.” ~ A Court of Wings and Ruin, page 507

Humans and Terraforming

If there is one thing that can be said, humans are very good at changing their environment. Now regardless of your views on climate change or greenhouse gases, it cannot be denied that humans have left a big and very literally mark on our planet.

We’ve been doing it ever since our primeval ancestors figured out that fire can be used to clear forest, and that the grasslands created by such burning attracts grazing animals and gives us a clear line of sight for our throwing spears and nets. We have been doing it ever since the ancient humans figured out they could damn creeks to make ponds that lured in waterfowl. That if you repeatedly burned a clearing, the berry bushes would keep coming back ever year. That if you created stone walls along the low tide line, you could create sandy terraces that are perfect for clams. We managed our resources, only fishing at certain times, only hunting certain types of animals, or only cutting certain types of trees.

Then we invented agriculture and we wrought even more changes on the planet. We cleared forests to make room for our fields, pastures and cities. We terraced entire hillsides to allow us to grow crops. We drained swamps and cut the landscape with irrigation canals to provide our crops with water. Often we changed the very course of rivers and altered the soil we relied on, sometimes for better and sometimes for worse. Forests disappeared as our cities and emerging states needed timber for construction, ship-building, and fuel to make pottery, smelt metals, cook our food, and keep us warm.

But we didn’t just change the landscape, we also changed the plants we grew so that they suited our needs. We changed the animals we relied on. We turned wolves into dogs, auroch into cows, ibex into goats, jungle fowl into chickens, and wild boars into pigs. We called this process domestication, and soon quickly forgot that we had ever been without these domesticates.

We made artificial hills for our rituals, built mountains out of cut stone to mark the tombs of revered rulers, carved symbols into the landscape. Sliced into mountains to carve roads, mine metal ores, and quarry stone. We made monuments so astounding that people thousands of years later thought they must have been made by the gods, and buildings of the modern age that dwarf them.

We’ve also traveled. We’ve crossed all our oceans, bringing with us the animals and plants of our homelands, and returning home with the animals and plants of other lands. Some is intentional. New crops that offer new advantages. Animals from far away to awe visitors or remind us of home. Some is unintentional. Plant seeds lodged in the tread of our boots. Insect larva in the bilge of our ships. Rats that scurry and stay out of sight, and hitch a ride on our sailing ships and outrigger canoes. Some we regret bringing, intentionally or not, others have settled in and carved their own place in their new home.

And now we look to the stars and wonder if we could do the same to other planets. To bring our life and our world to the stars. To turn a red planet green and blue.

And what if we succeeded? What if a red planet turned green, and flushed with our success, we turned to other balls of rock orbiting distant stars.

And what if we encountered other life. Life that was like us, but also very different. What if they had never seen life like ours before, that spread to the stars turning red, grey, and brown planets blue and green.

What if some are fearful. What if they seen our domesticated animals, our sculpted landscapes, and our diverse nations and fear that we will assimilate and change them and their world like we did to our ancient animal enemies and our distant home planet.

But what is some our awed, and look at us and see a species that can not only adapt itself to new and challenges and environments, but that also changes the challenge and environment itself. Often changing and adapting to the changes they themselves wrought. For better and worse, humanity sailed the stars on the crest of a wave of change that they themselves have been creating since their distant ancestors set fire to the underbrush and realized they could use this.

The Tulip in the Swan : Framing a bright emission region this telescopic view looks out along the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy toward the nebula rich constellation Cygnus the Swan. Popularly called the Tulip Nebula the glowing cloud of interstellar gas and dust is also found in the 1959 catalog by astronomer Stewart Sharpless as Sh2-101. About 8,000 light-years distant and 70 light-years across the complex and beautiful nebula blossoms at the center of this composite image. Red, green, and blue hues map emission from ionized sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. Ultraviolet radiation from young, energetic stars at the edge of the Cygnus OB3 association, including O star HDE 227018, ionizes the atoms and powers the emission from the Tulip Nebula. HDE 227018 is the bright star very near the blue arc at the cosmic tulip’s center. Glowing across the electromagnetic spectrum, microquasar Cygnus X-1 and a curved shock front created by its powerful jets lie toward the top and right. via NASA

js

Fruit and vegetables fall into five different colour categories: red, purple/blue, orange, green and white/brown. Each colour carries its own set of unique disease-fighting chemicals called phytochemicals. It is these phytochemicals that give fruits and vegetables their vibrant colour and of course some of their healthy properties.

What’s in a colour?

RED
Red fruits and vegetables are coloured by a natural plant pigment called lycopene. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that can help reduce the risk of cancer and keep our heart healthy.

PURPLE /BLUE
The plant pigment anthocyanin is what gives blue/purple fruits and vegetables their distinctive colour. Anthocyanin also has antioxidant properties that protect cells from damage and can help reduce the risk of cancer, stroke and heart disease.

ORANGE/YELLOW
Carotenoids give this group their vibrant colour. A well-known carotenoid called Betacarotene is found in sweet potatoes, pumpkins and carrots. It is converted to vitamin A, which helps maintain healthy mucous membranes and healthy eyes. Another carotenoid called lutein is stored in the eye and has been found to prevent cataracts and age-related macular degeneration, which can lead to blindness.

GREEN
Green vegetables contain a range of phytochemicals including carotenoids, indoles and saponins, all of which have anti-cancer properties. Leafy greens such as spinach and broccoli are also excellent sources of folate.

BROWN/WHITE
White fruits and vegetables contain a range of health-promoting phytochemicals such as allicin (found in garlic) which is known for its antiviral and antibacterial properties. Some members of the white group, such as bananas and potatoes, are also a good source of potassium.