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90′s Rock Vocalists Cheat Sheet

If the words are slurred and the lyrics you can make out often don’t make sense, it’s Eddie Vedder (Pearl Jam).

If the words are slightly less slurred and it sounds like he’s trying to sing through a hangover and a mouth full of jagged marbles, it’s Kurt Cobain (Nirvana).

If it’s somehow monotone and soulful at the same time and the backup vocals sound like six of the same guy singing at once, it’s Layne Staley (Alice in Chains).

If it sounds kinda like a dark and spooky Disney villain but also kinda like the guy at the biker bar who might kill you, it’s Zakk Wylde (Black Label Society).

If it goes from melodic singing to throat-murdering screaming in the span of one word and sounds like he’s gonna kick the world’s ass, it’s Dave Grohl (Foo Fighters).

If it goes from melodic singing to throat-murdering screaming in the span of one word and sounds like the world has kicked his ass, it’s Chris Cornell (Soundgarden/Audioslave).

If it has the deep grittiness of Zakk Wylde, the slurring of Eddie Vedder, and lyrics that make you wonder if it’s about sex or murder or both, it’s Scott Weiland (Stone Temple Pilots). 


BONUS: If it sounds like an alien trying to mimic the patterns of human singing while sacrificing all semblance of lyrical meaning in favor of nonsensical rhyming, it’s Anthony Kiedis (Red Hot Chili Peppers) and he doesn’t really belong on this list because no one mixes him up with anything.

Start using support levels instead of functioning labels!

For the uninformed, functioning labels are terms like high functioning autism, low functioning autism, mild autism, severe autism. Other words like moderate or level 1, level 2, etc may be used too.

Functioning labels are extremely offensive because they’re placed on autistic people based on observation from the outside. This is problematic for three reasons.

  • Functioning labels determine how autistic people are treated. People associate “low functioning/severe” with incompetence or infancy and they end up treating the autistic person like a pet or a baby. High functioning/mild gets stereotyped as people who are just a little quirky and their difficulties get ignored as laziness or intentional stubbornness.
  • Functioning labels imply brokenness and treat people as if their intrinsic value is determined by what they contribute to society rather than the fact that they are a living being with oxygen in their lungs and blood in their veins like everybody else.
  • Functioning labels create a dichotomy as if there are differing “levels” of autism or that people exist on different areas of the spectrum. NO, NO, NO, that’s not how it is.

Think of spectroscopy and how the elements create their own signature color lines. Now put peoples’ names in place of the elements: Hydrogen/Harold, Helium/Henry, Lithium/Luke, Oxygen/Olga, Carbon/Carol, Nitrogen/Nadine.

Autism is like that. We’re all on the same spectrum and all that is unique is how we display our symptoms, our sensory issues, our splinter abilities and so forth.

In light of that, I want to change the language. Let’s start pushing for support levels instead of functioning labels.

High support: Anyone who isn’t able to live independently and needs help with some or all of their basic daily living skills such as eating, bathing, basic grooming, putting on makeup, getting dressed and completing tasks. Can be abbreviated online or in writing as HSP for High Support Person or HSAP for High Support Autistic Person.

Usage in speech: Clarissa is a high support autistic person and needs assistance with getting dressed and taking a shower.
Abbreviated usage online: I’m a HSAP and I’m really into physics, so the poor sucker who signs me on is gonna hear a lot about it when they hand me my iPad! 

Medium support: Anyone may or may not live independently and doesn’t need help with basic living skills, but needs help with other things like cooking, completing some tasks, transportation if unable to drive and assistance for things like grocery shopping. Can be abbreviated online or in writing as MSP for Medium Support Person or MSAP for Medium Support Autistic Person.

Usage in speech: Kevin is a medium support autistic person and needs some assistance to prepare meals and shop for the wood he uses for his carpentry projects. His boyfriend, Max, usually helps him with those.
Usage online: I’m a MSAP and I’m looking for info about saws. Any fellow auties know what’s best for cutting oak? 

Low support: Anyone who more often than not lives independently and may only need assistance with minor things like balancing a checkbook, getting started on some tasks like organizing a garage sale or arranging to move from one house to another. Can be abbreviated online or in writing as LSP for Low Support Person or LSAP for Low Support Autistic Person.

Usage in speech: Jesse is a low support autistic person and she only needs help keeping her checkbook balanced.
Usage online: I’m a LSAP and I’m thinking about moving to Seattle. What’s the weather and traffic like there? 

Reasons support levels are better:

  • They don’t make assumptions about intelligence
  • They don’t encourage infantilization or pity
  • They sound more respectful and dignified

Ditch functioning labels and start using support levels. These terms can apply to practically every kind of disability, not just autism.

For the record, I’m a MSAP.

Please reblog this whether you’re disabled or not. Make this viral.

Family Of Fighters

Originally posted by lonlonmilk

Request: Can you write one where the teenage reader finds out her parents are hydra? When they leave for work she gets into their office and finds a dangerous file with plans to destroy the avengers tower. She takes it and runs away till she gets to the tower. She’s crying when she gets to the receptionist cause her parents will kill her for what she did. Tony relocates her to the compound since it’s safer and Nat wipes out her identity and helps her with a make over. She finds a family with them.

Pairing: Avengers x reader

Summary: You didn’t mean to find what you did, but you did. Now you need protection and the only people that could save you are the people they want to destroy.

Word Count: 2,075

Genre: Angst, fluff

Notes: There will be a second part to this! It was too long for one fic so I broke it into two :)


“How long are you guys going to be gone this time?” you ask your mother as she drags her bags into the living room.

“This business trip, about two weeks? I think anyways. Your father knows for sure” your mother says monotonously.

You nod and wait with your other for the cab. Your parents had a government job, although you didn’t know exactly that they did, and it took them around the world for weeks at a time. Every time you asked about your parent’s career they brushed you off, telling you that they were just advisers but never who for. As you grew older, you noticed all of the inconsistencies in their stories. You began asking more questions and those questions lead to many fights which lead to your very tense relationship with your parents. After two years of fighting, you had finally resigned yourself to a type of symbiotic routine with your parents. You would go to school and come home then up to your room without disrupting them, only ever really speaking when they were leaving for another trip.

You hear a honk outside and your father rushes into the living room with his bags, ignoring you and walking out of the house.

“We left money for take out. Don’t do anything stupid.” your mother said.

With that you were left in your big home, all alone just like you had been for most of your life. You sigh and go into the kitchen where you expect to find the money for food. Your face twists in confusion as you look around the bare counters to find no trace of the money they had promised. You walk around the house looking for the money but find nothing, until you stood in front of the study’s door. You were never allowed in there, it was strictly under lock and key held by your parents. You didn’t know why, it wasn’t like you were a problem child, if they told you not to do something you didn’t do it.

As you reach up onto the door frame looking for the spare key to open they door, you scold yourself lightly. This was a serious situation as if you didn’t have the money you couldn’t eat for the next two weeks so you knew your parents wouldn’t be to mad about it. You pull down the key, open up the door and walk to the giant mahogany desk on the other side of the room. You see two crumpled up hundred dollar bills sitting on top of a manila folder marked with a small red label on the corner that read ‘Top Secret’. Obviously, when something reads ‘Top Secret’ you curiosity is peaked. Maybe this is your chance to know exactly what your parents did.

You pocket the cash and slide open the folder carefully, as to not make it look tampered with. You pull out the papers and are greeted with a picture that filled you with dread. The cover photo of the title pile of documents was a red skull with six curving tentacles, the symbol of HYDRA. Your heart was racing as you pulled apart the other papers. You find ones that had pictures of your parents in soldier’s garb along with details you didn’t even know about them. Was this why they were so secretive? Were your parent’s really members of HYDRA?

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