recombine

Our fear of death is deeply ingrained. It has been said that our knowledge of our mortality is what distinguishes us from other animals, and is the motive force behind almost all human action and achievement.

… Our ancestors feared death, not just because dying in the past without modern medicine must have been so terrible but also for fear of what might come after death.

But I do not believe in an afterlife. I am a neurosurgeon. I know that everything I am, everything I think and feel, consciously or unconsciously, is the electrochemical activity of my billions of brain cells, joined together with a near-infinite number of synapses (or however many of them are left as I get older). When my brain dies, ‘I’ will die. 'I’ am a transient electrochemical dance, made of myriad bits of information; and information, as the physicists tell us, is physical. What those myriad pieces of information, disassembled, will recombine to form after my death, there is no way of knowing. … So there is no rational reason to fear death. How can you be afraid of nothing? But of course I am still frightened by the prospect. I also greatly resent the fact that I will never know what happened - to my family, my friends, to the human race. But my instinctive fear of death now takes the form of fear of dying, of the indignity of being a helpless patient at the mercy of impersonal doctors and nurses, working shifts in a factory-like hospital, who scarcely know me.
—  Henry Marsh, Admissions: Life As A Brain Surgeon
Why does DNA have so many recycled dance moves?

If you’re paying attention to the choreography, you’ll notice some iconic moves taken from previous BTS performances (most noticeably, from Blood, Sweat, and Tears). The obvious metaphor here is that the dance moves represent bits of DNA, recombined into a single new organism. 

But if you take what BTS said, about DNA being about their bond as a group and how they were meant to be together, and then you look at how the seven of them became linked into a single double helix structure, it’s clear that the dance moves are meant to represent the building blocks of their past successes and creations, recombined to become who they are now - a group that is BUILT upon the blood, sweat, and tears of their past, so tight-knit and cohesive and integral to each other’s existence, they’re practically one. 

The Deep Lagoon : Ridges of glowing interstellar gas and dark dust clouds inhabit the turbulent, cosmic depths of the Lagoon Nebula. Also known as M8, The bright star forming region is about 5,000 light-years distant. But it still makes for a popular stop on telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius, toward the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Dominated by the telltale red emission of ionized hydrogen atoms recombining with stripped electrons, this stunning, deep view of the Lagoons central reaches is about 40 light-years across. Near the center of the frame, the bright hourglass shape is gas ionized and sculpted by energetic radiation and extreme stellar winds from a massive young star. via NASA

js

anonymous asked:

What the fuck are mushrooms what are they I have no clue please help

fruit but like. fungus fruit

like i wish i was making this up but like???? the reason they exist is for the same reasons fruit exists. like

fruit (meaning fruiting structures in this case, not fruits and veggies): 

-made by plonts

-basically just the expanded ovary of the plant after the plant has sexy times

-holds seeds, which are baby plants that are genetically different from the mother. when the fruit falls the babies use the food in the fruit to grow into new plants

mushrooms: 

-happen when two or more fungus living in the ground, in the wood, in whatever substrate the mushroom is growing on, have sexy times

-they dont really have typical sexy times?? like they just smash themselves together until they fuse and make a special arm thing made of cells with nuclei from all the fungi involved in the sexy fungus time

-the weird arm thing eventually grows up to above ground and develops into a mushroom with help from all the fungi parents underground

-the mushroom spits out spores. all the spores have recombined versions of the parents’ genes and are basically baby fungi cells. the mushroom pumps these out in the millions and they drift on the wind or whatever until they find a nice spot where they can live their happy fungus lives in peace. think about spores as seeds without the food for survival if it helps you???

-also a single mushroom can have up to 9 different parents

-and funguses can have literally 20k+ biological sexes so just smash that together and u prob have a baby one way or another 

-basically mushrooms exist so the fungi can reproduce spores in a way that can better get picked up and spread around. if they stayed underground, the babies wouldn’t be able to get anywhere; when the spores are pumped out above ground somehow, they can get picked up by the wind, rain, animals, whatever and can go find a better place to live. mushrooms are distribution organs. 

a good diagram (x): 

-also fun side fact scientists have learned that lightning strikes in some fungus patches greatly accelerate the rate of mushroom production in certain species, to the point where commercial mushroom farms shock some of their fungus patches to promote growth. we think this is an evolutionary thing that some species have developed in response to trees getting struck by lightning. like if a tree gets struck, the funguses around it are like guys we’re gonna get so much food omg and start reproducing because they can afford to if they’re about to get a giant dead tree to eat

fungi are weird man

Aurora over Sweden : It was bright and green and stretched across the sky. This striking aurora display was captured last month just outside of stersund, Sweden. Six photographic fields were merged to create the featured panorama spanning almost 180 degrees. Particularly striking aspects of this aurora include its sweeping arc-like shape and its stark definition. Lake Storsjn is seen in the foreground, while several familiar constellations and the star Polaris are visible through the aurora, far in the background. Coincidently, the aurora appears to avoid the Moon visible on the lower left. The aurora appeared a day after a large hole opened in the Suns corona allowing particularly energetic particles to flow out into the Solar System. The green color of the aurora is caused by oxygen atoms recombining with ambient electrons high in the Earths atmosphere. via NASA

js
I googled science pick-up lines and I was not disappointed
  • You’re so hot, you denature my proteins. 
  • Do you have 11 protons? ‘Cause you’re Sodium fine!  
  • You make my anoxic sediments want to increase their redox potential. 
  • I’m more attracted to you than F is attracted to an electron. 
  • We fit together like the sticky ends of recombinant DNA. 
  • You’re hotter than a bunsen burner set to full power. 
  • If I were a neurotransmitter, I would be dopamine so I could activate your reward pathway. 
  • According to the second law of thermodynamics, you’re supposed to share your hotness with me. 
  • How about me and you go back to my place and form a covalent bond?
  • I wish I were Adenine because then I could get paired with U.
  • If you were C6, and I were H12, all we would need is the air we breathe to be sweeter than sugar.
  • I want to stick to u like glue-cose.
  • You must be the one for me, since my selectively permeable membrane let you through. 

I’m in a very “late-’90s nostalgia” place right now, so let me pick up where I left off last night and ramble on about why Animorphs was so fucking great.

So, in the beginning, the series had very distinct good guys and bad guys.

Now, what made them good guys and bad guys?

Well, their goals made them good guys and bad guys.

One side was fighting to enslave humanity and destroy the Earth. The other side was fighting to keep that from happening.

And, in the beginning, that was enough.

But it’s a sixty-book series, and a little ways in, by about book sixteen, the kids are starting to ask themselves (and each other), “Hey. Wait. No. Can we honestly pretend the ends justify the means?”

“Can we honestly tell ourselves that, because we’re defending our planet, literally anything we do is automatically justified?”

“Is it not possible for us to go too far?”

“Are there moves that it’s fundamentally morally indefensible to make?”

And from that point onward, it’s not just about goals. Now it’s also about tactics. They’re the good guys because they have Limits, because they have Rules.

They say, “No, we’re not going to pretend the ends justify the means.”

“We’re not going to sink to the level of our enemies.”

“We’re not going to be cruel. We’re not going to be cutthroat. We’re not going to be inhumane or controlling. We’re gonna be clean. We’re gonna be good. We’re gonna be ethical and compassionate.”

“There’s no point fighting our enemies if we just become them in the process. We have to be the bigger people.”

And, again, for a while, that’s enough.

But if the series is about anything, it’s about how war breaks down everything you think you know about yourself. By the end of the series, all six main characters have committed atrocities on a massive scale.

There’s one book late in the series where they literally threaten to nuke their own hometown, and all the innocent people in it, because it becomes strategically advantageous.

Now, they end up not having to because the enemy folds, but the fact that they almost did it, the fact that they would have done it if they’d been pushed just a little bit farther, fucking haunts them.

But at least they didn’t, right? Like, if nothing else, at least they have the small, quiet comfort of knowing it ultimately didn’t come to that.

Oh, except, four books later, they end up nuking it, anyway.

It’s that kind of series. You’re never out of the woods.

In the beginning, the good guys’ leader, Jake, is specifically a reluctant leader. He didn’t want the job. He didn’t ask for it. If he could, he’d happily give it to someone else. He becomes the leader because he’s the one every other member of the group instinctively turns to when times are tough.

He becomes the leader because they need him to be the leader.

Not because he wants power, not because he likes it, not because he thinks he’s the best guy for the job. But solely because, when the chips are down, he’s the one they turn to. Every time.

They elect him, despite his own protests.

He is humble, and he is brave, and he’s this very idealized archetype.

He’s very much cast in the mold of, like, Pop Culture George Washington, the venerated veteran who naturally, effortlessly just exudes strength and power and wisdom and confidence and charisma but honestly really just wants a moment alone in the shade.

That changes by the end of the series.

By the end of the series, he is just a straight-up dictator. He has seventeen thousand defenseless prisoners executed just because he can.

Just because he wants to watch them die.

It’s actually pointed out in the last book, in canon, that he is, by all rights, a war criminal several times over – and that the only reason he’s not being prosecuted is because he was on the winning side.

A lot of fucked-up shit happens in the last five or ten books. Probably the most downright sickening thing is when the good guys recruit a small army of physically disabled kids, then basically throw them at the enemy as a momentary distraction. And they’re slaughtered. All of them.

But what makes the series memorable isn’t just that a lot of really dark and shocking stuff ends up happening. That’s not special by itself.

It’s that the characters spend so much time talking about it.

You know, it’s a kids’ series – these are, like, fourth-grade reading level – that isn’t remotely afraid to have hard conversations about how there’s no such thing as a good war, how even good people can be swayed to do terrible things, and how no one is ever above reproach.

I’m not going to say it’s necessarily perfect, sensitivity-wise, but it’s kind of amazing how much it doesn’t take for granted.

It’s very willing to have the debate (whatever debate happens to be at hand), show all sides, and let that play out to its natural endpoint.

And all this exists in a series that also has plots like, “I turned into a starfish, and a random little kid chopped me in half (because kids are jerks), and then both halves regenerated into a separate me, except one is good and one is evil, weirdly, for some reason, and we need to recombine ourselves by electrocuting each other.”

- Mod A.

Kingdom Hearts, a summary: Intended for those not familiar with the series.

There was a war because of selfish people wanting to have more light than others. A ton of people died trying to become the controller of the source of light, called Kingdom Hearts.

Originally posted by masteraqua

Hella years later the war is forgotten by most but this guy, Master Xehanort, does some research and thinks he’s found a way to gain control of Kingdom Hearts so he separates his apprentice into two parts and has them fight each other to create the key to the light.

Originally posted by windwaver

Originally posted by rinmaidtsuoka

But since he’s old and wants to be young again, he also decides that he’s gonna put his heart(soul) inside his apprentice’s best friend since that friend has a knack for Darkness powers like he does.

Originally posted by 3ladyinred3

His plans fail and he ends up with amnesia. While amnesiac he becomes an apprentice to Ansem the Wise who wants to help cure his amnesia so Ansem decides to start experimenting with hearts(souls) and Darkness. This ultimately causes Xehanort(the old asshole) to be split into two parts. One of them calls himself Ansem, the other calls himself Xemnas.

Originally posted by behind-xemnas

Both of them still want to gain control of Kingdom Hearts so they both make fabricated doors to Kingdom Hearts. Ansem makes his from the Hearts of a bunch of worlds, and Xemnas makes his from the hearts of hundreds of thousands of living beings who became Heartless.

Originally posted by salmonypink

Originally posted by kankurobot

Sora(the hero) stops them both, and even kills them, causing them to recombine into Master Xehanort. He’s now been stopped three times but since he has back up plans on top of back up plans on top of black up plans he also had Ansem contact his younger self in the past and give him special powers in case all his plans failed.

His younger self then travels throughout time gathering thirteen vessels to all be part Xehanort. The true doorway to Kingdom Hearts requires a key made from thirteen pieces of Darkness and seven pieces of light. So he’s decided to be more patient and less hasty, he’s going to make a team of Xehanorts and they’re gonna fight against a team of seven good guys to create the key he wants. So far we know the identities of six of the Darknesses(Master Xehanort, Young Xehanort, Xigbar, Saix, Ansem, and Xemnas) and all seven Lights(Sora, Riku, Aqua, Kairi, Lea(who everyone calls Axel), Ventus, and King Mickey).

The Cygnus Wall of Star Formation : Sometimes, stars form in walls bright walls of interstellar gas. In this vivid skyscape, stars are forming in the W-shaped ridge of emission known as the Cygnus Wall. Part of a larger emission nebula with a distinctive outline popularly called The North America Nebula, the cosmic ridge spans about 20 light-years. Constructed using narrowband data to highlight the telltale reddish glow from ionized hydrogen atoms recombining with electrons, the image mosaic follows an ionization front with fine details of dark, dusty forms in silhouette. Sculpted by energetic radiation from the regions young, hot, massive stars, the dark shapes inhabiting the view are clouds of cool gas and dust with stars likely forming within. The North America Nebula itself, NGC 7000, is about 1,500 light-years away. via NASA

js
Why I didn’t like the Maximum Ride movie

It’s awful. This film only takes half, at most, of what Maximum Ride is about. Let’s rhyme it off.

- The house in the mountains is supposed to be the safest and most comfortable place the flock has ever been to. They. Do. Not. Want. To. Leave. Angel gets captured when the flock are ambushed by a team of Erasers with a CHOPPER while out picking wild strawberries near their secret house in the woods, where they are not cooped up inside all the time; they can go outside and fly around freely.

- Max’s first encounter with Nudge in the film is her threatening and yelling at Nudge. Max is their mother figure; she doesn’t yell at the flock, with the exception of Fang.

- They mis-aged all the characters. Angel is supposed to be 6, Gazzy is 8, Nudge is 11, and Max, Iggy and Fang are 14. Not so in the film.

- Max NEVER had the files on their identities hidden in the house. Ever. Those were found by the flock at the school much later in the storyline.

- When the flock abandoned the house and went on the run, all 5 (not including the captured Angel) were on the way to Lake Mead. Max split from the group to help Ella (the unnamed girl who Max rescued in the film), who was being bullied by several boys, and not from some drunk boyfriend, as Ella is also only 14.

- When Max is shot, Dr. Martinez, who is a VET and not a DOCTOR, examined her and discovered Max’s wings due to the fact that the bullet injured Max’s wing as well as her shoulder. Max was x-rayed and her chip was found in her FOREARM. Dr. Martinez and Ella both know about the Flock and their avian-hybrid capabilities, and in the film, they’re left in the dark and are barely a blip on the plot-line map. Max is then made to wait at somewhere around 3 days before her wing is healed enough to fly to Lake Mead.

- When Max catches up to the flock at Lake Mead, the flock are staying in a CAVE. Not a cabin, with food and warmth and beds. A cave. Eating stolen food out of dumpsters and snacking on some chocolate chip cookies that Dr. Martinez made for Max before Max left. They learn new flying techniques from the family of hawks that nest nearby.

- It appears that all of the flock have chips embedded in them somewhere, as the School seems able to monitor their physical statuses.

- Max is meant to accidentally kill Ari in a one-on-one fight in the sewers below the School while escaping with the flock and several other able-bodied recombinant DNA kids, and Total, the talking dog. Jeb finds Ari as Max is leaving the tunnel behind the rest of the pack, and as Max is flying away, he yells after her that she killed her own brother. Whoops. Way to forget a super important plot twist.

- Max’s first encounter with the Voice, the thing that showed her all those images of her childhood and New York at the end of the film, is supposed to be VERBAL. It’s the VOICE. It speaks.

- They neglected to mention that Ari, Jeb’s son and the main Eraser character of the film, is only 7 years old, and aged physically due to his DNA being effed with when he became and Eraser.

- Angel does actually speak. She doesn’t say a word in the film until almost the end of the movie. She does actually talk.

- Max sees none of those images about her childhood or about a file. She sees images of New York and the word Institution repeated over and over. That is the only clue they have when they set out for New York.

- Nudge is a much more happy-go-lucky character than she is portrayed as in the movie, where she is an emotional, angsty teenager.

- Wtf was with the casting choices, dude? Max needs to be way move average build, not a toothpick. Toothpicks can’t hold their own in a fight against superhuman wolf-men. Fang needed long black hair. Iggy’s wings were supposed to be white, as were Gazzy’s and Angel’s. Not to mention they were all several years too old for their characters. Ew. Just ew.

Other than all that, the pacing was terrible, there was no sense of urgency to the film, and no real sense of danger in the scenes where Angel is being experimented on. The tests in the book were portrayed to be much more severe, and they were more like rat-in-a-maze type tests than intellectual, solve-the-equation type tests.

Also, the scars on their backs are complete BS. The wings fold up small, close to their backs. Not INTO their backs. They don’t just go poof. Sorry. Way to avoid any of the potentially-accurate sciencey bits, Mr. Director. I can’t believe James Patterson signed off on this bullcrap.

The Flame Nebula in Visible and Infrared : What lights up the Flame Nebula? Fifteen hundred light years away towards the constellation of Orion lies a nebula which, from its glow and dark dust lanes, appears, on the left, like a billowing fire. But fire, the rapid acquisition of oxygen, is not what makes this Flame glow. Rather the bright star Alnitak, the easternmost star in the Belt of Orion visible just to the right of the nebula, shines energetic light into the Flame that knocks electrons away from the great clouds of hydrogen gas that reside there. Much of the glow results when the electrons and ionized hydrogen recombine. The above false-color picture of the Flame Nebula was taken is a composite of both visible and infrared light, the later energy band being where a young star cluster becomes visible. The Flame Nebula is part of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex, a star-forming region that includes the famous Horsehead Nebula. via NASA

js
SinglesMingle.com

Originally posted by vitunkpoppi

Character(s): Reader X Changkyun, bestfriend!jooheon

Genre: fluff, borderline!crack

Warning(s): scientist!changkyun (is that a warning), online dating, bad humor

Length: 3.2k

Summary: In which your best friend sets you up for an online dating site and maybe it’s not so bad when you meet a  scientist by the name of Lim Changkyun.


There’s a reason you don’t let Jooheon touch your laptop. Aside from the porn sites (and the numerous viruses acquired from them) he’s not to be trusted alone. You’ve known this since the third grade when he came over for a playdate and ended up drinking a bottle of Elmer’s glue while you went to the bathroom because he was too shy to ask for water.

He can’t be trusted.

Keep reading

Arabic-Inspired Lentil Loaf and Jerusalem Salad

Don’t mind my cat’s tail! That really is the best picture from my bunch and I couldn’t stop laughing, so I had to!

I had this ambitious idea to make lentil burgers this week and sometime around, hmm, right before lunch I said, “Or, I could skip getting it stuck all over my hands and sorting through the dud burgers and just smash the whole thing into a baking dish and call it a loaf.” I did make some significant changes to the flavor profile, so this is not my lentil burger recipe. I’ll have to share that with you sometime I’m not so lazy! I made the flavor profile much more Arabic seven-spice inspired and infused it with a tart glaze on top that adds a contrast to the deep earthiness of that spice mixture.

On the side, I served a Jerusalem salad. I had this salad for the first time at a shawarma place on my college campus and it’s taken me this long to properly replicate the dressing. It gives the plate a really nice fresh note and a little bit of coolness. I think these pair beautifully.

Loaf

  • 1 lb dried lentils, rinsed and picked over
  • 2 eggs (or egg substitute)
  • 1 TBSP olive oil
  • 1 cup rolled oats, milled into flour
  • ½ large onion, diced
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 serrano, minced 
  • large handful of spinach, chopped
  • 2 TBSP fresh parsley, minced
  • salt, to taste
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 1 + ½ TBSP cumin
  • ½ TBSP paprika
  • ⅛ tsp clove
  • ⅛ tsp nutmeg
  • ¼  tsp cinnamon
  • ½  tsp cardamon 

Glaze

  • 2 TBSP pomegranate molasses
  • juice of a lemon
  • 1 tsp sugar

Directions: Cook the lentils to package instruction ahead of time and have your vegetables prepared as well. Preheat the oven to 350F. In a food processor mill your oats and set them aside in a small bowl. Next, pulse your lentils in the food processor. Do not turn it into a puree, just pulse it around a few times to break them up a bit. If you think the lentils don’t have enough “give” to them add a tablespoon or two of water. In a large mixing bowl, toss in the lentil mixture, the 2 eggs, and the oil. Stir it around a bit. Now, add in the onion, carrots, garlic, serrano, spinach, parsley, and all salt + spices. Stir it around to combine thoroughly. Lastly, add in the oat flour and stir to recombine. In a small saucepan, pour in the pomegranate molasses, the lemon juice, and the bit of sugar. Heat it up over high heat and once it bubbles, take it down to low, and stir constantly until it thickens slightly.

Spray a baking dish (around 11”x13”) with no stick, spoon in the mixture, and even it out. Pour the pomegranate glaze on top and stick it in the oven. Cooking time will vary depending on ovens and dish dimensions so start checking for doneness at the 25-30 minute mark. 10-12 servings.

Salad

  • 1 lb cucumber, diced
  • 1 lb vine ripe tomatoes, diced (don’t keep too much of the “guts”)
  • ½ red onion, diced
  • 2 TBSP fresh parsley, minced
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice (2-3 lemons depending on ripeness)
  • ¼ cup tahini paste
  • 3 TBSP plain, unsweetened Greek yogurt or alternative (I used So Delicious)
  • 1 large clove of garlic
  • salt, to taste

Directions: Prepare vegetables (except the garlic) and place them in a mixing bowl. In the food processor combine the lemon juice, tahini, yogurt, garlic, and salt. Blitz it until completely smooth. Pour it on top of the vegetables and stir to combine. Ideally, let it sit the fridge for a bit before serving.

nytimes.com
We Aren’t Built to Live in the Moment
What best distinguishes human beings from other animals is our foresight, as scientists are just beginning to recognize.
By Martin E. P. Seligman and John Tierney

Most prospection occurs at the unconscious level as the brain sifts information to generate predictions. Our systems of vision and hearing, like those of animals, would be overwhelmed if we had to process every pixel in a scene or every sound around us. Perception is manageable because the brain generates its own scene, so that the world remains stable even though your eyes move three times a second. This frees the perceptual system to heed features it didn’t predict, which is why you’re not aware of a ticking clock unless it stops. It’s also why you don’t laugh when you tickle yourself: You already know what’s coming next.

What best distinguishes our species is an ability that scientists are just beginning to appreciate: We contemplate the future. Our singular foresight created civilization and sustains society. It usually lifts our spirits, but it’s also the source of most depression and anxiety, whether we’re evaluating our own lives or worrying about the nation. Other animals have springtime rituals for educating the young, but only we subject them to “commencement” speeches grandly informing them that today is the first day of the rest of their lives.

A more apt name for our species would be Homo prospectus, because we thrive by considering our prospects. The power of prospection is what makes us wise. Looking into the future, consciously and unconsciously, is a central function of our large brain, as psychologists and neuroscientists have discovered — rather belatedly, because for the past century most researchers have assumed that we’re prisoners of the past and the present.

Our emotions are less reactions to the present than guides to future behavior. Therapists are exploring new ways to treat depression now that they see it as primarily not because of past traumas and present stresses but because of skewed visions of what lies ahead.

If you’re a chimp, you spend much of the day searching for your next meal. If you’re a human, you can usually rely on the foresight of your supermarket’s manager, or you can make a restaurant reservation for Saturday evening thanks to a remarkably complicated feat of collaborative prospection. You and the restaurateur both imagine a future time — “Saturday” exists only as a collective fantasy — and anticipate each other’s actions. You trust the restaurateur to acquire food and cook it for you. She trusts you to show up and give her money, which she will accept only because she expects her landlord to accept it in exchange for occupying his building.

The brain’s long-term memory has often been compared to an archive, but that’s not its primary purpose. Instead of faithfully recording the past, it keeps rewriting history. Recalling an event in a new context can lead to new information being inserted in the memory. Coaching of eyewitnesses can cause people to reconstruct their memory so that no trace of the original is left.

The fluidity of memory may seem like a defect, especially to a jury, but it serves a larger purpose. It’s a feature, not a bug, because the point of memory is to improve our ability to face the present and the future. To exploit the past, we metabolize it by extracting and recombining relevant information to fit novel situations.