really good boots

okay one last thing about bootlegs before i’m off for the night

hamilton could literally give out professional recordings for free tomorrow, and it would not put a dent in any of it’s profits. there’s literally another album for it coming out on friday, it’s made three million dollars, it’s double platinum, people up charge tickets in resale to like 400 bucks and people still buy em, the lotto, merch, hamilton chicago/atlanta/los angeles/wherever else it’s gonna be next year. 

this isn’t some small show like tuck everlasting and american psycho was. it’s not gonna close anytime soon like fun home. it’s not being overshadowed by any other show like waitress and school of rock. and it sure as hell isn’t gonna lose any money if they put out a professional recording, free or not. 

so bottom line: if you’re one of those people that’s still bashing fans that watch bootlegs, not just of hamilton, but of any musical, you’re elitist/classist/and probably racist (cause yes, these things do go hand in hand believe it or not), and really just need to shut the fuck up cause the hamilton bootleg isn’t hurting a god damn soul. 

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.
—  Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms

Growing up, I read a lot of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld books. In particular, there’s one passage from Men At Arms that is often quoted:

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

This is an example of a wider phenomenon that the disciples of the reflected-sound-of-underground-spirits refer to as “incomplete credit markets”. In a world of complete credit markets, there would be a simple solution to the boots theory of socioeconomic unfairness: Vimes takes out a $40 loan. That, plus a $10 down payment (the same $10 that he would otherwise have paid for crappy boots) will be enough to afford the $50 good boots. Assuming a reasonable interest rate (say, 5%) and that Vimes pays off $10 per year (the same $10 that he would otherwise have paid for crappy boots), he will pay of the loan in five years, paying a total of $55.79 ($10 down + $40 principle + 5.79 interest). He therefore saves $44.21 over the ten year life of the boots. (Plus, he keeps his feet dry during this time). The fact that loans with reasonable interest rates are not available to men on a watchmen’s salary (even a watch captain’s salary) implies that credit markets in Ankh-Morpork are, as in the real world, sadly incomplete.

10

Finished up some @asagaoacademy mini Normal Boots and Hidden Block Letterman Jackets. The NB and HB guys are actually really cool and very nice people so I’m glad the game has given them a little more attention. It was fun to be able to dust off the old sewing machine and make something crafty too ^-^

@peanutbuttergamer, @yungtown, @didyouknowshaning, @asagaoacademy, @projared, @spacehamsterg, @brutalmoose, @thatonevideojirard, @jontronshow-blog

When Yes was working on our second or third album, probably around 1970, Freddie used to work in the Kingston Market in the boot store as a shop assistant. Bill Bruford and I used to go there and buy boots from this store, which made really good rock ‘n’ roll boots at that time. I always remember Freddie bending down on the floor when I was trying on these boots and feeling my toes and how my foot fit in there, and he would say, 'Me and a bunch of guys I know, we’re rehearsing. We want to be in a band and do well.’ Of course, I was a little patronizing and was like, 'Well, good luck with that,’ never thinking the boot salesman would actually become Freddie Mercury.
—  Chris Squire

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while a poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time AND WOULD STILL HAVE WET FEET.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes “Boots” theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

—  Men At Arms by Terry Pratchett
MikaYuu & thigh high boots ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Okay we have all talked about Mika in his thigh high boots at some point. Now imagine Yuu trying on Mika’s thigh high boots(let’s pretend that Mika told him to try them on) and then Mika blushes because Yuu looks really (sexy!)good in those boots. Mika makes it his mission to get Yuu his own thigh high boots. IMAGINE BOTH MIKA AND YUU WEARING THIGH HIGH BOOTS!

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

—  Terry Pratchett, Men At Arms

Here’s my favourite item from GISHWHES this year (Item 31: Personify the name of a street sign)

(We found Collins St and Gay St near us, and it was too good an opportunity to pass up so we searched for a Dean St and did all three.) With me as Cas, my housemate as Dean, and @irishangelniall behind the camera. Special thanks to my other irl friend for letting me borrow his Cas costume, which was so much fun to wear and sooo tempting to just run off with…

“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

Men At Arms

2

What’s your name, man?

Gingerbreadman Hamilton

“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while a poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes “Boots” theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

 - Men at Arms, Terry Pratchett (pg. 32, Harper fiction edition)