reality media

2

Let’s be real for a moment shall we? The guy on the right eats healthy and works out regularly. The guy on the left does the exact same thing. Social media is a place where we all filter out everything but the best representations of ourselves and share it with others. Because face it we all want others to see us at our very best. What happens though is when you compare yourself to the very best version of someone else it makes it incredibly hard to be happy with any version of yourself. So here’s a comparison of a real world me and a flexed best version of me. Because let’s face it I don’t walk around flexing everywhere I go. I wear comfortable cloths, I lounge around, I like to relax and I certainly don’t always look like the best versions of myself I share from time to time.
Social media plays a major part in body image issues and even I can say I’ve fallen victim to it comparing my progress to someone else’s. There’s a constant pressure to look perfect and it’s a toxic mindset to fall into.
Don’t compare yourself to the person that’s posing in front of the camera and only showing you the very best version of themselves. You have to remind yourself of who you are and what is real.

5

Gene Demby explains the Overton Window

“[Trevor] Noah isn’t wrong that compromise and good-faith are necessary for functional politics. But. There’s this idea in media studies called the Overton Window. Basically, the MSM defines the universe of legitimacy in public discourse. The news media covers/gives voice to lay inside the realm of legitimacy; the stuff it downlplays/ignores is on the fringes/unacceptable.

People of all ideological stripes try to expand and move the Overton window; the Civil Rights Movement did this exceptionally well.
Illegitimate ideas–and noxious/dangerous ones–creep into the universe of legit via the language of controversy and debate. This is how a lot of the mainstreaming of the so-called “alt-right” is already happening: 

“Let’s put these noxious ideas up for discussion!”

“Let’s debate them and smack down those janky ideas with superior facts and logic!”

And those ideas up for debate tend to be things like whether Muslims are inherently violent or Black people possess lower native intelligence.
And slowly, the Overton Window shifts. And suddenly, the humanity of entire groups is a subject of legitimate, mainstream debate. And then so do the policy ideas that correct the “problems” presented by those groups. It doesn’t happen all at once. And it starts small, like having people on your show to debate whether Islam = terrorism or BLM = The KKK. This is the problem presented by treating Tomi Lahren as a person whose views are worth fighting about/engaging. And more broadly, it’s the danger presented by supposed “alt-right” thinking given official legitimacy by the White House. These notions will become just another set of seemingly partisan positions to be argued about, pro/con style on CNN.”

Fiction doesn’t hurt real people.

real people hurt real people.

Hey, remember all those 90s sitcoms where the leading actor is basically just playing a wacky, cartoonishly exaggerated version of themselves, to the point that they don’t even bother to give the character a different name?

What would yours be about?

The Gulf War was a war from 1990 to 1991 between the United States and Iraq. American pilots bombed an Iraqi convoy. Many US media declined to publish the photograph above. War is often romanticized in media. In reality, it is brutal. Here’s a thread where people have commented with their experiences in war or a relative’s experiences. (Thread)