reality fiction

anonymous asked:

Ya know, the more I look into antis, the more I see antis on my dash, the more I realize a lot of them are misinformed. And no, I'm not talking about the "y'all should die" groups. More like "lol het shippers ship abusive ships" and the like. They're these people who think fiction needs to be wholesome and Good and people who ship "bad stuff" are supporting bad behavior. Like, they don't even consider the "it's art" category or even "I ship them differently" category. Just my observations, tho.

Antis are very misinformed about what reality is and what fiction is and how they differ. They don’t seem to understand that fiction =/= reality and that fandom =/= reality and taking an interest in something problematic in a fandom environment doesn’t mean that person is supporting it in real life. They have a very closed off view of how people perceive fiction and things in fandom environments

1st anon with the numbers. …“What?” And eeeee, you are back, I just love your “creative” ask.

2nd anon…thank you. I know…it’s rather sad and scary to see these people send hate over a fictional ship/characters.

3rd anon….sigh…let me guess, age between 13 to 17. Snowflake. Klance end game and anti anything Shiro, probably reblog that stupid age video, sends anon hate because they are a sad, sad little girl who can’t get the stick out of her ass.

4th blocked message. …I have your blog name. I will be reporting you. Why I tagged Klance, because it is well known that klance fans have sent hate to people. (I’m a klance fan too, but I’m also a multi shipper because I know the difference between fiction and reality.

5th anon…..your words means nothing to me because I’m sure you are a talentless hack. The only thing you have is hate and making people feel like crap. I hope you grow up and learn to be a human being, until then, suck my invisible figurative dick.

Getting caught reading fanfiction...
  • them: Hey what're you reading?
  • me: Um an ebook
  • them: Ooooh what's it called?
  • me: Hmmm i just really can't remember haha... that's the thing about being immersed in a fictional universe haha... you forget the titles HAHA
  • Meanwhile in my head.....
  • I've read this fanfiction 500 fucking times, I can quote it from start to finish,, I literally dream this fanfiction, I breathe this fanfiction, if you went into my mind all you would see is this fan-

I am really tired yall.

Lemme just preface this with saying that I am a writer. I have been writing for most of my life. I have taken actual classes about writing and about what fiction can offer you, me, and people as a whole. I have won an award for something that I wrote. I know and love fiction, be it in written form, graphic novels, or film. It is all so good and complex and it’s something I am passionate about. That said, let’s get into this.

A good majority of the discourse that goes on in most of the fandoms I’m in stem from the idea that violence and forbidden sexual acts in fiction will encourage those actions in reality. It is important to know, firstly, that the only time this happens is when a person is immature enough or not mentally healthy enough to distinguish reality from fiction. Growing up, my parents would often stop horror movies (back when I first started watching them) to ask me questions. To be fair, they were pretty shitty people, but in this one aspect, they were so good about making sure I knew this difference. “You know this is just a movie, right? None of the stuff on the tv is real.” They’d assure before continuing the film.

It’s not real.

Now, half of the stuff I read or watched back then was nowhere near pushing boundaries or making me think critically about society or whatever. However, I knew that what I watched wasn’t real. It was images on a screen. If I don’t like what I’m seeing, I can walk away. It doesn’t have to affect me, personally,  unless I let it.

Now, lets circle back. School. College. I took a writing class that used this book:

Granted, it was a screenwriting class and most of the chapters were about various script formats, but the beginning chapters focused on why we write and why we make the stories we do.

It had a section in it describing how human needs and desires are met through fiction. It detailed those needs in a list. This list:

Please draw your attention to the ones on the list that say that fictions helps people to:

Be purged of unpleasant emotions

To have vicarious but controlled emotional experiences

To confront, in a controlled situation, the horrible and terrible

To explore taboo subjects without guilt

Just because you personal don’t need various forms of ‘taboo’ media, doesn’t mean that others don’t. Media, in all of its forms, is a way for people to explore things safely. It’s an outlet that doesn’t harm anyone and it offers the creator and viewer/reader a safe way of exploring the complexities of situations (or in some cases relationships) that these people do not want to be involved in irl. Because we can distinguish reality from fiction. Because none of us are going out killing people or getting into abusive relationships or fucking our sibling.

While being critical of the media we consume is important and it is vital to dissect the whys of the media being created, there is a line between creating open discussion about these taboos, about the society and personal experiences that makes one need these outlets, and verbally abusing and harassing strangers.

If you want to create a dialogue about media or a ship you don’t agree with, fine. Talk about it. Dissect it. Really dig deep into the human condition and the psychology behind these outlets, but don’t shame people for them to the point of telling them to kill themselves or telling them they are human garbage or what the fuck ever.

Fiction isn’t always meant to be picturesque. It’s not always going to be SFW. If that isn’t your cup of tea, then great. Stop going into the tags of things that make you feel unhealthy. You do you. Keep yourself safe. Stop continuously exposing yourself to content that you can’t swallow. To keep getting involved, to keep harassing people, to keep abusing strangers shows that you don’t give a damn about the content. You need an excuse to bully someone else and indulge in holier-than-thou circle jerks with other people who also have no sense of what fiction is for.

roteli  asked:

You mentioned in a post that fiction ≠ reality, but to kids it's not, fiction shapes how they see the world. Fiction is supposed to show them what's right and what's wrong. Adults who support adult/minor relationships make it had for children to distinguish that line if they haven't dealt with discourse (in the actual sense of the word) on serious subjects before. I can't make you stop shipping adult/minor ships, but I hope you consider what you're posting and the consequences that they have.

Is it fiction that shapes their perception or context?

I will agree that what we see in the media can influence us to some extent; a tragic movie can bring us to tears, just like a drama can educate us on matters across the globe, and propaganda has been used - even in modern day - to try and change the opinions of the masses to suit a greater power.

That being said, those things all rely on context: our tears spring from empathy, the education relies on a desire to be educated, and propaganda usually is on the back of a society willing to believe or being fed specific information from other sources. It’s like in children’s shows. We see Bart Simpson being strangled by his father, or Keith name-calling Lance, but children usually know these things are completely wrong.

They know not to imitate ‘Tom and Jerry’, because they have parents and teachers there to say: “it is wrong to hurt someone else”. They get time-outs on the naughty step, or a spanking in certain cultures, or just a long lecture … they usually have some trusted figure there to discipline and/or explain, so that everything they watch is through that same filter of understanding.

It’s why we need to supervise the media our children consume.

I think you are right: if this is the only discourse a child sees, it can have detrimental affects, but - massive ‘but’ here - where are the parents/guardians? Why are strangers on the Internet meant to parent the children of other people, whom they have not agreed to legally raise?

See, when we grew up, this was a constant discussion. We were taught basics of reproduction as soon as we asked questions. We were taught about ‘naughty places’ and ‘private places’. We were taught never to let an adult touch there. These discussions evolved over time, so - as a young teenager - we were taught about statutory rape, that even if we ‘want’ it that it’s still wrong, and so forth and so forth … 

We need to put the responsibility for raising a child on the parents.

Tumblr is 18+ on the app, 13+ on the website, I believe? While AO3 allows all content and explicitly states this, while having a tagging and rating system for you to make an informed choice about what you see. This means we have to lay responsibility upon the parents for not supervising or limiting the Internet activity of the child, instead of trying to infringe upon the rights of adults and remove their safe spaces to produce/consume art as they wish.

It’s basically a case of there being safe spaces for children, too, where they can discuss/consume art freely without coming across such materials, but that falls upon the parent to make sure that they are on the right websites … example, if I do not like porn then I avoid porn sites. If I don’t want to see shipping, I don’t go onto Tumblr or AO3.

What I’m advocating is personal responsibility. 

We need parents/guardians to stop the children from seeing these things, or for them (and schools) to provide a context to what they see … if a child knows that it’s fiction, just like child abuse in ‘The Simpsons’ or glorified violence in ‘Tom and Jerry’ is just fiction, they won’t normalise it and seek to emulate it. The answer isn’t to ban or censor such cartoons; no one would ever say ‘ban cartoons’, because they’re a part of life, but I think providing context to cartoons is absolutely key to these things.

One last example … 

I was around eight when “South Park” first came out; we watched it religiously as children, even with videos cassettes of it, because parents assumed that it was safe as all cartoons were for kids (that was their mistake and their fault as parents, because - like with shipping - the content isn’t the problem, but that it’s made accessible by parents unwilling to supervise their own children). 

In our case, we had massive context for what we saw (luckily, our parents were good on that score, which is part of why I always advocate teaching children, especially if you aren’t willing to supervise them). We never copied the bad language (some people I know today never swear; even I say ‘shoot’ or ‘darn’ as a general rule). No one I know copied the violence (I don’t have a single friend from that group who ever tried to kick a baby, for example). 

It was just entertainment. We laughed and enjoyed it, but we never copied it or held it up to a standard of normality … it was just a cartoon; we knew that, because our parents taught us that, as well as teaching us the behaviour in such cartoons was inappropriate in real life. This is why education is key.

If a child has parents that accidentally let them see Keith/Shiro, they should at least have the education and context to know that behaviour is inappropriate and should not be copied … it’s not up to shippers to stop creating such works, because the places we’re in are designed for adults or for all age-groups with explicit rules allowing such art. Now, if I went onto a children’s forum and posted such things -? Bad. On Tumblr -? Not so bad.

Sorry for the long essay back. 

We just need to realise that art/fanfiction isn’t the problem; the problem comes from parents/guardians not contextualising what children see, or preventing them from seeing it in the first place. We also need more safe spaces just for children, both moderated and supervised by responsible adults, so they have places to go that - well - aren’t Tumblr or AO3.  

8

The Art of Laurence Jones

In the words of the artist Laurence Jones:

My paintings incorporate elements of both fiction and reality, and are brought to fruition through a varied means of production. I draw from a pool of collected images that are then digitally edited, and serve as a starting point for a process-based practice. The paintings lend themselves to a simulation of reality, presenting a hyperreal aesthetic that is heightened by the screen-like finish of the work. The scenes deal with the nature of the postmodern gaze, and how this is affected by fabricated spaces.

Follow the Source Link for images sources and more information.

The novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin became popular in the northern states and created huge amounts of sympathy for the Abolition movement with it’s portrayal of an enslaved man. Abraham Lincoln allegedly said that the book was one of the reasons white people in the north began calling for a Civil War.

The film A Birth of a Nation was directly responsible for the Ku Klux Klan’s reestablishment as well as a reported spike in racially motivated crimes, attacks, and even riots.

A study has shown that watching shows that feature homosexuals and homosexual relationships increases viewers’ sympathy for lgtb causes, even in people who claim to be uncomfortable about homosexuality before they begin watching.

A significant portion of people involved in the world’s space programs claim that Star Trek and similar shows and movies inspired them as children and began their interest in space and science.

Currently there are more students than ever involved in forensic studies programs and there is evidence that shows like CSI, Law and Order, and other investigative crime shows is a factor in the increase in interest in the field.

Although still being researched, many experts claim that a “CSI Effect” is responsible for jurors demanding more forensic evidence in criminal trials there by raising the standard of proof for prosecutors, even if the standard is unrealistic and inaccurate.

The American Psychological Association has confirmed a link between violent video games and aggressive behavior especially in children.

Don’t tell me that fiction doesn’t impact reality.

You decide to attack artists, developers, creators, and authors because you don’t like what they produce, because of the canonized ships/or the fact they like ships you don’t, because of their gender, their sexuality, and for the main fact you can’t tell the difference between fiction and reality, etc..:

You are a bully, you are an abuser, you are not a good person, something is seriously wrong with you.

You attack people over fictional material. You care more about fictional human beings than real human beings. You absolutely sicken me.

Hello, survivor here who grew up with illness and disability and who loves to explore life through fictional characters because it’s a good way to think outside of your own experiences and learn and grow and also to have fun.

Can we stop pretending that unsavory fan content made by survivors is more powerful than big bucks goreporn movies coming out every year? There’s so much discourse about how someone’s geeky indulgent fanfic can cause a whole generation of sickos to feel validated by it and go commit horrible crimes but if an obscure fic is that powerful and influential because to you fiction = reality, why isn’t a musical where we root for the characters making people pies treated the same?

If fans shouldn’t be allowed to write weird or dark or gross things for coping, speculation, learning, healing, empathy, creative exercise, or just for fun just because there might be people who cannot separate fiction from reality, then why isn’t media seen by literal millions your target as well? Because individuals are easy targets and this is all performative and you don’t actually care about us, you hurt us because that’s how weak and powerless you are, you have to harass some 20 year old survivor just trying to explore things safely in the realm of fiction and act like their weird crackship fic with 800 hits is responsible for every new trauma victim created that month.

I’ve got a secret for you: telling survivors they should be ashamed of what they create and they should kill themselves because you personally are grossed out or uncomfortable with their OTP doesn’t protect them or anyone else from harm. The one doing harm is you. Stop harming real people in the name of hypotheticals. I have seen this go on for far too long. You hurt people who are already hurting. Who does that save?

Fellow survivors and even people who just like writing dark things and know that what they write isn’t reality: asking “what if?” and exploring that creatively is not a sin.

If you can’t distinguish fiction from reality or you think other people can’t then I’m sorry but this isn’t our problem. If you choose to be bitter about something other people don’t have a problem with, then go away. Turn off the internet.

im 100% certain y'all don’t give as much of a fuck abt the very real predatory relationships occurring to REAL people but that’s none of my business.